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Full text of "Current Sauce (Volume 1987-1988)"

1 






JUNE 23, 1 987 



VOL 76 NO. 2 




CURRENT 




NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA 



NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 71497 




Warren Easton mars completion 

Campus undergoes renovation 



Jnder Construction 

Renovations to the boiler system on campus are expected to continue throughout the summer 
months with a scheduled completion date to be in early February 1988. 




Northwestern State 
University Police Depart- 
ment Officer Sonnia Bap- 
tiste has been chosen as 
Northwestern's nominee 
for the 1987 Louisiana Uni- 
versity Police Association's 
state officer of the year. 
Baptiste is one of 10 univer- 
sity police officers from 
colleges across the state 
nominated for the award. 
The award will be pre- 
sented during the LUPA 
state convention, July 28-29, 



at the Louisiana State Uni- 
versity Medical Center in 
Shreveport. Baptiste has 
been on the Northwestern 
police force since 1984 and 
is a graduate of the Bossier 
Parish Community College 
Criminal Justice Institute. 
She is a graduate of Natchi- 
toches Central High School 
and is the daughter of Mary 
Lee Steele of Natchitoches 
and the late Tommy Steele 
Sr. 



Although the campus has 
been marred by construction since 
the end of the spring term, at least 
eight months remain until the 
project is completed. 

The campus is currently 
undergoing a steam rehabilitation 
project, exterior lighting update, 
and several building renovations, 
according to Loran Lindsey, 
physical plant director. 

The most noticeable is the 
steam rehabilitation project. Work 
jon the project includes digging 
land replacing pipes, installing 
Ifour satellite boilers, building out- 
iside covers for the new boilers and 
[repairing leaks in the current sys- 
tem. The steam system provides 
hot water for the campus and 
during the winter is responsible 
for heating the buildings. 

"We were losing a lot of 
chemicals, energy and warm wa- 
ter to the air. The boilers were 
having to constantly produce new 
hot water," Lindsey said. 

The satellite boilers will al- 
low the University to shut down 
the main boiler for maintenance 
during the summer while still 
providing various buildings with 
hot water and humidity control. 

"We'll have a much more 
efficient system when completed, 
so we'll be able to provide better 
service at a lower cost," Lindsey 
said. 

The project began behind 
Iberville Dining Hall and has cut 
its way across campus. Students 
are currently avoiding trenches 
and dirt mounds around the cen- 
ter of campus. 

The steam rehabilitation 
project is the last phase of a 10-year 
utility master plan. Created in 
1978, the plan included such proj- 
ects as installation of a new water 
main and sewage system, three 
phases of an electrical distribution 
system and an update on exterior 
lighting. 



Over the 10-year period 
more than $8 million has been 
spent on utility updates. Lindsey 
said the overall largest phase of 
the master plan was the electrical 
distribution project which con- 
verted the University's power to a 
13.8 volt system. The 10-year plan 
was funded by Legislative appro- 
priations. 

An update to the exterior 
lighting of the campus is also 
under construction. Workers are 
installing more light poles, fix- 
tures and lowering existing poles. 

"We're lowering the level of 
the lights so that they will shine 
beneath the trees," Lindsey said. 

Existing lights poles will be 
lowered to about 13 feet since 
some of the light produced was 
being lost in the trees, Lindsey 
explained. In addition to lowering 
the lights, the incandescent fix- 
tures are being replaced with high 
pressure sodium fixtures. 

"They are much more effi- 
cient and at the same time give 
more illumination," Lindsey said 
of the new fixtures. 

The cost of the current exte- 
rior light expansion is set at 
$35,000. 

Although the steam reha- 
bilitation and light fixture projects 
are more noticeable, the campus is 
also undergoing a variety of other 
construction projects. 

One such project is the reno- 
vation of Warren Easton. Under 
construction since last fall, the 
work is in its final phases and is 
expected to be completed by July 
24, Lindsey said. Warren Easton 
will house the elementary lab 
school which will create addi- 
tional classrooms in the P.E. 
Major's Building and the Teacher 
Education Center. 

Renovations to Louisiana 
Hall are also underway. Expected 
to be completed by August 21, 
plans for the hall include repairs to 



the electrical and air conditioning 
systems and overall moderniza- 
tion of the building. The project is 
expected to cost $500,000. 

Another project is the $1.4 
million modernization of the Stu- 
dent Union, Iberville Dining Hall, 
Warrington Place, and Rapides, 
Sabine and Natchitoches halls. 
The project is being funded from 
redirected insurance monies from 
Caldwell Hall. Caldwell was de- 
stroyed by fire in 1982. 

'These buildings are get- 
ting a facelift to create a better 
atmosphere," Lindsey said. 

Plans for the buildings 
inlcude painting, installation of 
new ceilings, general mainte- 
nance work, and repairs in the 
kitchen of Iberville. 

"I'm looking forward to the 
fall. I think we'll see some new 
excitement and some new atti- 
tudes about the dorms," Lindsey 
said. 

The Women's Old Gym on 
College Avenue, which has been 
used for storage, is also receiving 
some attention. The gym is getting 
a new roof and the windows and 
doors are being replaced. 

Renovation of Varnado 
Hall is set for late September. 
Expected to be upon for the 1988 
fall term, Varnado will undergo 

antiquity of its electrical and sew- 
age systems. 

Lindsey also revealed fu- 
ture plans to update the air condi- 
tioning system in Kyser Hall and 
to install a new chiller, air handler 
and cooling tower in the Student 
Union. These projects will not be 
finalized until after 1988. 

"We've got so much going 
on right now that I have to keep 
notes," Lindsey said of the many 
projects currently underway at 
Northwestern. 

LISA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 



Shuttle Service 
made available 



The Recreation Complex 
shuttle van is now in operation. 

Designed for students with 
no transportation, the van takes 
students from the Northwestern 
campus to the Recreation Com- 
plex on the Highway 1 Bypass. 

"The shuttle van has al- 
ready brought several students 
out to the pool," lifeguard Katrina 
Gilson of DeRidder said. 

In operation since Saturday, 
the shuttle picks up students from 
Prudhomme and Bossier halls. 
The van, which will make daily 
runs, goes by. the dorms at 1, 3 and 
5 p.m. Students can ride out to the 
Complex on the 1 and 3 p.m. rides 
and return at 5 p.m. The 5 p.m. run 
will be a return ride only. 

"I think the van is a good 
idea. I don't have a car and it's a 
hassle to find a ride everytime I 
want to go out to the Complex to 
go swimming," Sonya Rigaud, a 
junior from Morgan City, said. 

Students need a current 



NSU I.D. to ride the van and to use 
the Complex facilities. Both the 
van ride and entrance to the pool 
are free of charge to all full-time 
students. 

Provided by the Athletic 
Deparment in cooperation with 
the Department of Student Life, 
the van currently being used is 
temporary. Plans for obtaining a 
permanent shuttle bus are cur- 
rently underway. 

In addition to swimming, 
the Recreation Complex also of- 
fers golfing, a driving range and 
tennis. On Tuesday's, full-time 
NSU students can play golf free of 

charge. 

Students wishing to ride the 
shuttle van should wait in the 
lobby of either of the dorms. 
Adequate time should be allowed 
for the arrival of the van due to 
traffic conditions. 




1 



PAGE 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



JUNE 23, 1987 




FROM THE NEWSROOM C 



P.E. Department to head Intramurals 

Intramurals changes hands 



"In reviewing our student 
activity program, we felt that we 
could enhance the intramural 
program by taking advantage of 
the sources and personnel of the 
Physical Education Department," 
Fred Fulton, Director of Student 
Life, said about the decision to 
move intramurals from Student 
Life to the Physical Education 
Department. 

Fulton said the students of 
Northwestern will benefit more 
with the intramural program 
under the direction of the P.E. 
Department. 

Dr. Sam Coker, Head of the 
Department of Health, P.E., and 
Recreation, said the intramural 
program was originally run by the 
P.E. Department. 

"It had been in this depart- 
mentuntil roughly lOyearsago. It 



was a good move (the transfer to 
Student Life) at the time because 
there was not much money allo- 
cated to the program in the Physi- 
cal Education Department," 
Coker said. "We knew that in 
order to run a full program we 
needed to change it to Student 
Life. It was the kind of thing that, 
due to the structure of the organi- 
zation of the school, was easier to 
come up wi th a substantial budget 
for intramurals through Student 
Life." 

Coker said that supervision 
of the Intramural Department 
should return to the P.E. Depart- 
ment, although Northwestern 
now has a student body that has 
never associated the P.E. Depart- 
ment with intramurals. 

"Intramurals is part of our 
business. Historically and philo- 



sophically, Physical Education 
has handled intramurals through- 
out the country. This is commonly 
the way it is done," Coker said. 

"Almost all of the facilities 
that are used are the Physical 
Education facilities," Coker 
added. "It makes it easier to con- 
duct the program if we do it 
through this office. We feel we can 
do the job well." 

Coker said he is planing 
many changes for the intramural 
program. Changes include in- 
creasing student involvement, 
planning activities which em- 
phaszie special holidays, and 
adding a dormitory league to the 
existing independent and Greek 
leagues. 

Coker said he plans to util- 
ize the same facilities for intramu- 
ral activities as used by the previ- 



ous department. In the past, intra- 
mural events have been held at the 
Intramural-Recreation Building, 
P.E. Major'sBuilding, Intramural 
Field and the Recreation Complex. 

"All I can say is that if we get 
to implement the program we 
have in mind, I have no worry that 
the students will be satisfied," 
Coker said. 



SONYA RIGAUD 

Staff Writer 



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NEW HOURS 

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107 HWY. 1 SOUTH 352-5555 

•SUN.-THURS. 10 am-10 p.m. 
•FRI. & SAT. 10 a.m.-ll p.m. 

5 Specials Available Now! 

SPECIALS GOOD THRU JUNE 30, 1987 



1987 POTPOURRI 

Distributed Thursdays 

1-3 p.m. 
227 Kyser Hall 





COOL DOWN... 

with A 

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TORNADO- «2S2^ 




Phone in Orders- Welcome 

357*8198 



Breakfast Menu Served From 12:00 am til 11:00 am 
ALL OTHER ITEMS SERVED 24 HOURS A DAY!! 



>■'-*'[ 
ft 



THE WAREHOUSE 

Health and Racquet Club 

Natchitoches' Newest Tradition 

... A unique concept in fitness 

... Featuring Bodymaster weight machines, racquetball courts, 

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... Babysitting services 
... Designed for personal satisfaction 
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... Relaxed, fun environment where an individual, a couple, or 

groups from a local business can join and set individual goals 

to achieve optimal health 
... Prescriptive programming available 

Coed Open 7 days a week 
Great Location - Across from the university 



Why not invest in yourself? 
You're worth it! 

357-0772 



William Ackel, Owner 
David Coker, Manager 
Warehouse Health and Racquet Club 
400 College Avenue 
Natchitoches, LA 714S7 



RimiiUhall. WiMPhu »nrt Airnhirt 
Sudani ■ $25 
Single ■ $30 
Couple - Vfi 
Family -SSO 

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Couple - $35 

Family • $43 

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FRI. & SAT. 10:30 AM-11:00 PM 



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FOUR HOT N JUICY 

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"WE GOTTA' 
REMEMBER TO 
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HOT 'N JUICY SPECIALS. IT'S MORE GOOD NEWS FROM WENDY'S. 




Vi lb. Double 
Hamburger 

CHEESE 20- EXTRA 



Good at Wendy 1 * 109 Hwy. 1 South, Natchitoches. La. 
Tax extra where applicable. 
OFFER EXPIRES 6-30-87 

HOT N JUICY SAVINGS 

C 1987. Wendy's All Rights. 





Combination 

14 lb. single hamburger, 
regular fries, 16 oz. 
soft drink J-j^99 



CHEESE 20- EXTRA 




Good at Wendy '» 109 Hwy. 1 South, Natchitoches, La. 
Tax extra where applicable. 
OFFER EXPIRES 6-30-87 

HOT N JUICY™ SAVINGS 

C 1987. Wendy's All Rights. 




Small 
Frosty 

69* 



Good at Wendy's 109 Hwy. 1 South, Natchitoches, La. 
Tax extra where applicable. 
OFFER EXPIRES 6-30 87 

HOT N JUICY™ SAVINGS 

€ 1987. Wendy's All Rights. 





Hot Stuffed 
Baked Potato 



Good at Wendy's 109 Hwy. 1 South, Natchitoches, La. 
Tax extra where applicable. 
OFFER EXPIRES 6-30-87 

HOT N JUICY™ SAVINGS 

C 1987, Wendy's All Rights. 





6 



Too 
especially 
the Curret 
[being ovei 
about thin 

Altr 
plaints an 
think we 
'away. 

Hav 
University 
the comp] 
with that 
appears as 
western ai 

For 
one comp 
that the dc 
Iphones. 1 
Rumor ha 
dorm rooi 
-unless yo 



THI 




Melissa I 
Eermant 
Germant 
touisiani 
Jtudent < 



"The 
drove onto 
hat it is so ( 
i/. Whethe) 
bfeteria, the 
thuays pleas 
we about i) 



m 



PAGE 3 CURRENT SAUCE JUNE 23.1987 



VI ON OUR MINDS 



99 




Nice cl^an car va GoTTueRe, bub • 

... UKG I WAS SAVING TO MY PALS CV£R 
"TMege, \T0 B€ARGAL SHAMG IF 
ANYTHING WAS To HAPPEN TO IT 1 




©1987 Universal Prosi Syr>a>cai« -fO^v^fc 



Post Office policy: 

Return to Sender 



Neither rain, sleet, snow nor 
hail can stop the U.S. mail from 

being delivered unless you are 

trying to mail your letter from the 
NSU Post Office on a Friday. Ef- 
fective from June 26 to August 7 
the post office window will not be 
opened on Fridays. 

It is obvious that the ad- 
ministration is trying to be 
budget-conscious by whittling 
down the hours of most campus 
facilities to a four-day work sched- 
ule, but they should realize that 
they are making campus life a li ttle 
tough and tedious for those stu- 
dents who must endure this sum- 
mer session. 

I find it curious that NSU 
will make a facility, that more or 
less recognizes and follows the 
guidelines of a federal institution 
(the United States Postal Service), 
not process second-class mail, not 
accept personal checks and to ac- 
tually discontinue its weekly serv- 
ice to the public by one day. 



There is little motive for a 
student to remain on a campus 
that "shuts down" for a weekend, 
let alone a three day weekend. But 
many students do not have the 
option or privilege to leave this 
campus. Some rely on the campus 
facilities to maintain the simple 
day-in-the-life endeavors; such as 
communication through the 
postal system. 

One may ask: what is one 
day less in the services of our 
campus post office? It could mean 
up to three days in limbo until a 
letter, possibly important, to start 
toward its destination, or up to a 
three-day wait for incoming mail. 
This problem may sound trivial, 
out for the student in desperate 
need to relay an important mes- 
sage, or receive an important de- 
livery, such as money desperately 
heeded for the weekend, three 
days can be rather inconvenient. 

Other values exhist, beyond 
our monetary system, that NSU 



should consider before making 
budget-conscious decisions. If the 
new Northwestern is going to be 
student oriented, it cannot afford 
to limit all campus facilities to a 
four day-a-week work schedule 
during the summer session. The 
frustration within the dorm stu- 
dents may create an off-campus 
oriented individual: the seed of 
apathy towards campus functions 
and organizations. 

There are other restrictions, 
toward the NSU student, through- 
out the three-day weekend. 
Within this time period the oppor- 
tunity to buy bookstore materials, 
eat an early breakfast, swim in the 
natatorium, or canoe in Chaplin's 
Lake is nonexistant. 

The opportunity for the 
student to further his studies by 
using Watson Library is regulated 
because of its being closed on Sat- 
urdays. Not only are the students 
inhibited in seeking measures of 
recreation, they are not able to 



capitalize on the spare time (and 
being on campus there is plenty of 
it) toward library research. 

To kick a dead dog: summer 
school is a hard grind. A student 
relies on the simple, daily activi- 
ties to function smoothly, in order 
to maintain a little sanity. Let'snot 
make the task any harder. 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 



■ r' I" 

Be gratefuL.it could be worse! 



Too often we students (and 
especially those connected with 
the Current Sauce) are accused of 
being overly negative and critical 
about things at Northwestern. 

Although many of the com- 
plaints are valid, even I tend to 
^hink we sometimes get carried 
away. 

Having attended a different 
University, I am able to compare 
the complaints at Northwestern 
with that of another school. It 
appears as if some things at North- 
western aren't so bad after all. 

For example, the number 
one complaint of the summer is 
that the dorm rooms have no tele- 
phones. Well, brace yourself. 
Rumor has it that in the fall no 
idorm rooms will have telephones 
-unless you bring your own. 



Not having a phone is defi- 
nitely a nuisance. However, at 
some schools the thought of hav- 
ing a free phone in every room is 
never even considered. At my 
alma mater, if students wanted 
phones in their rooms they had to 
go through Ma Bell, and Ma Bell is 
one tough cookie. If you think it's 
hard to get good phone service 
here, you should deal with that old 
lady. Ma was always busy, made 
you wait in lines forever, and re- 
quired a $90.00 deposit. (All this 
just to get a phone, not to mention 
that you had to stand in line again 
once a month just to pay for the 
services.) 

Moving right along -North- 
western students are famoiis for 
saying "There's nothing to do 
here." It's true that it may not be 



the most exciting place, but North- 
western does offer more than the 
average small university. 

For example, how many 
schools have a country club with 
an Olympic-sized swimming 
pool, tennis courts and a nine-hole 
golf course? Not to mention an 
indoor pool, a fitness trail, a lake, 
two cafeterias, and a building 
designed especially for students' 
recreational use -and all on cam- 
pus. 

And how about the long list 
of intramural activities? I went to a 
school where the only things they 
offered were basketball, softball, 
volleyball and flag football (girls 
were not even allowed to play that' 
rough game of flag football). The 
intramural program was run by 
the Physical Education Depart- 



ment, and needless to say, was 
dominated by physical education 
majors. No one else even thought 
about participating. At least here 
they offer a wide enough variety 
of events to include those who 
enjoy backgammon and card 
games. 

And another thing -at least 
Natchitoches offers a big blowout 
(Christmas Lights Festival) once a 
year. Imagine Northwestern in a 
town where the biggest thing 
going was the hamburger joint 
across the street. Or in a town 
where it was illegal to buy or sell 
alcohol (the closest place being 30 
minutes away). 

Despite all the hardships 
(no phones, no nearby booze), the 
school I attended was a fun school. 
It was about the same size as 



Northwestern and in a town about 
the same size as Natchitoches. Our 
campus wasn't as beautiful, and 
our dprms weren't palaces, bu t we 
had fun. And this was back before 
the days of VCRs. 

I wonder why it's not so fun 
here? Why do so many people 
gripe? Maybe it's time we accentu- 
ate the positive. Northwestern is 
like any other university -small or 
large-it's only what you make of it. 

LISA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 



THIS WEEK'S QUESTION: 



What is your first impression of Northwestern? 




uffed 
Potato 

59 





IF! 



Helissa Palmer 
jermantown High School 
Sermantown, TN 
-ouisiana Association of 
Student Council (LASC) 

"The first thing to strike me as 
drove onto the campus was the fact 
hat it is so clean and well taken care 
t Whether in the bookstore or the 
vfeteria, the workers and students are 
fovays pleasant and appear to really 
'are about the school." 



David Walker 
Destrehan High School 
Destrehan, LA 
LASC 

"My first impression of North- 
western was good. It looked like a very 
delightful place to go to school after 1 
graduate." 



Jackie Elders 
Bonnabel High School 
New Orleans 
LASC 




Tina Baffes 
Ursuline Academy 
New Orleans 
LASC 



"NSU was to me a very large "The first thing that I noticed 

and spacious place. The campus itself about Northwestern was the clean 
was full of scenery and I enjoyed the campus and how peaceful the environ- 
long walks everywhere. The dorm was mentis." 
cozy and clean, unlike other campuses 
I have been to. I now want to come 
back next year." 



Jay Budd 

Northshore High School 
Slidell, LA 
NSU Band Camp 

"/ think it's a great place, I 
really like the faculty, and the music 
program." 



m m 



HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? 
WRITE A LETTER TO THE EDITOR 



CURRENT SAUCE 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 

LISA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 

STEVE HORTON 

News Editor 

NAN GOSS 
SONYA RIGAUD 

Staff Writers 

ALLEN EVANS 

Advertising Manager 

EDD LEE 

Circulation/Distribution 

CHARLOTTE RUSH 

Photo Editor 

TOM WHITEHEAD 

Adviser 



The Current Sauce is 
published every two weeks 
during the summer 
semester by the students of 
Northwestern State Univer- 
sity of Louisiana. It is not 
associated with any of the 
university's departments 
and is financed indepen- 
dently. 

Current Sauce is 
based in the Office of Stu- 
dent Publications located 
in Kyser Hall. The office of 
the editorial staff is 225A, 
telephone (318) 357-5456. 
The adviser's office is 103 
Kyser Hall, telephone 357- 
5213. 

The mailing address 
for the Current Sauce is P.O. 
Box 5306, NSU, 
Natchitoches, LA 71497. 

All correspondence, 
including letters to the edi- 
tor is welcome. Material 
submitted for consideration 
must be mailed to the 
above address or brought 
to the office. 

The deadline for all 
advertising and copy is the 
Friday before Tuesday pub- 
lication by 9 a.m. Inclusion 
of any and all material is left 
to the discretion of the edi- 
tor. 

Letters to the editor 

should be typed (double- 
spaced) and signed, and 
should include a telephone 
number where the writer 
can be reached No 
anonymous letters will be 
printed. 

Current Sauce sub- 
scription rates are $ 1 1 per 
academic year (26 issues) or 
$6 per semester (12 issues). 
The paper is entered as 
second-class mail at 
Natchitoches, LA. The USPS 
number is 140-660/ 



wm 



PAGE 4 




CURRENT SAUCE 



JUNE 23, 1987 



AROUND CAMPUS 



Academic skills workshop 

All students enrolled in at 
least one developmental educa- 
tion course, such as English 0910 
or 0920, Math 0910 or 0920, and 
Reading 0900, 0910, or 0920, are 
invited to attend special skills 
workshops that are being pre- 
sented by the Department of Spe- 
cial Services. All freshmen enter- 
ing for the first time at NSU are 
also urged to attend. 

Dates for the workshops 

are: 

June 9th — Orientation Pro- 
gram—at 3:30 p.m., in the Kyser 
Hall Auditorium. Required for all 
students enrolled in at least one 
developmental education course. 

June 17th— Using the Li- 
brary— at 3:30 p.m., in Watson 
Library, Room 111. 

June 23rd— Goal Setting, 
Time management and Study 
Habits— at 3:30 p.m., in Room 243 
of Kyser Hall. 

July 1st — Notetaking for 
Lectures and Textbook Reading — 
at 3:30 p.m., in Room 243 of Kyser 
Hall. 

July 7th — Outlining, Sum- 
marizing, Paraphrasing — at 3:30 
p.m., in Room 243 of Kyser Hall. 

July 15th — Becoming Test- 
Wise— at 3:30 p.m., in Room 243 of 
Kyser Hall. 

For more information about 
the academic skills workshops 
contact Mary Dillard, Director of 
Special Services, in Room 104 of 
Kyser Hall, or telephone her at: 
357-5901. 

Telescope 

Northwestern's Depart- 
ment of Chemistry, Physics and 
Geology has purchased a tele- 
scope at the estimated cost of 
$10,000. The Celestron 14 tele- 
scope is housed in the new obser- 
vatory on top of Fornet Hall. The 
installation of the telescope, which 
is considered the best among fac- 
tory-made models, completes the 
$3 million renovation project of 
Fornet Hall. 

According to Dr. Thomas 
Griffith, chairman of the depart- 
ment, the telescope will be util- 
ized in the teaching of astronomy 
classes and will also allow North- 
western to serve as a center of vis- 
ible science for high school and 
grade school students and the 
general public. 

"Through this particular 



telescope, meteor showers, plan- 
ets and the different shapes and 
colors of galaxies can now be 
viewed at Northwestern," Griffith 
said. 

Among the features on the 
Celestron 14 telescope are a 14- 
inch diameter mirror, long-time 
exposure photography capabili- 
ties, and an automatic tracking 
system. 

Griffith said first-hand 
knowledge of what lies outside 
the Earth's own galaxy could be 
gained by the public through spe- 
cial programs his department is 
planning to offer at the observa- 
tory. 

For more information on 
Northwestern's new Celestron 14 
telescope, or the programs and 
services which will be made avail- 
able to schools and general public, 
call: (318) 357-5501, or write: Dr. 
Thomas Griffith, Chairman, De- 
partment of Chemistry, Physics 
and Geology, Northwestern State 
University, Natchitoches, LA. 
71497. 



Academic interviews 

Special Services located in 
104 Kyser Hall is now making 
appointments for academic inter- 
views. NSU students are invited 
to make an appointment with one 
of the counselors to discuss goals 
and objectives of one's university 
career, to discuss one's major or 
how to choose a major, to make 
plans for the fall semester, and to 
learn more about what is available 
to the student through Special 
Services. Students from all aca- 
demic levels are invited to partici- 
pate in the program. 

Holiday 

Classes will be canceled 
Thursday, July 2 for the Fourth of 
July holiday weekend. Classes 
will resume on Monday, July 6. 
Dormitories and the Student 
Union cafeteria will remain open 
during the holiday. 

SAB movie 

The Student Activities 
Board will be showing the movie 
"Nothing in Common" on 
Wednesday, June 24, in Union 
Station. Admission is free with 
NSU student I.D. 




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1l 

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Failu 
Failu 
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Makii 
Oper 
Drivir 
Failu 



ADMIT 



DISCII 
NORT 



PAID 



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The 
rcntly un< 
order to p 
building h 
The 
repainting 
tion of ro 
and the a< 
patio area. 

Accc 
director of 
public arc 
hallways, 
room will 
paint. Pain 
ing the ce 
and recen 
the Ballroc 
The 
areas will ; 
however, c 
stair wells 
lighting fi 
throughou 
In z 
facelift, the 
major ren 
River Roo 
Room loea 
The 
beenlargcc 
Room anc 
which arc 
both sides 
moved to ! 
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counselor, 
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>87 



JULY 7, 1987 



VOL. 76 NO. 3 



CURRENTS 




NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA 



NATCHITOCHES, LOl 



JMA 71497 



4 



Radar detector used to give pedestrians rights 



University Police to enforce new traffic restrictions 



NSU FINES FOR TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS 

SPEEDING 

16 to 25MPH $7.50 

26 to35MPH $12.50 

36 to 40MPH $15.00 

41 to 45 MPH $20.00 

46 to 50 MPH $25.00 

Over 50 MPH $1.00 per mile 

over the speed 

Failure to obey instructions of a University Police Officer $20.00 

Failure to stop for stop sign or red light $20.00 

Reckless operation of vehicle $35.00 

Making U-turn $15.00 

Operating vehicle on sidewalk or grassy area $1 5.00 

Driving wrong way on one-way street $1 0.00 

Failure to yeild to pedestrian in crosswalk $10.00 



VIOLATIONS NOT PAID WITHIN 30 DAYS WILL BE ASSESSED A $10.00 
ADMINISTRATIVE FEE. 

REPEATED VIOLATIONS OF MOVING VIOLATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO 
DISCIPLINARY ACTION AND DRIVING PRIVILEGES SUSPENDED FROM 
NORTHWESTERN CAMPUS. 

ALL VEHICLE REGISTRATION FEES AND VIOLATION FEES MUST BE 
PAID IN THE CASHIER'S OFFICE, ROOM 202, ROY HALL. 



In an effort to crackdown on 
speeding throughout campus, the 
University Police, in conjunction 
with the NSU Traffic Committee, 
have slated some changes in regu- 
lations and fines. 

The brunt of the changes 
occur in fines for traffic violations. 
The traffic committee, an advisory 
board comprised of faculty, staff, 
and four students, created new 
violation fines which no longer 
comply with the Natchitoches 
City charges. 

Sandra Moreau, secretary of 
the University Police Department 
and consultant to the traffic 
committee, said NSU fines for traf- 
fic violations are considerably 
cheaper than the city violation 
fines. 

"Running a stop sign in 
Natchitoches may cost the indi- 
vidual $68, while doing the same 
on campus will cost the individual 
$20," Moreau said. "We have re- 
searched other campus traffic vio- 
lation fines and ours is compatible 
with those of Tech and North- 
east." 

Parking violations will 
carry a $5 fine with the exception 
of handicapped zones which will 
be $15. According to the new 
regulation manual any vehicle 
that acquires four or more tickets 
per semester will be immobilized. 
Repeated offenders of moving 
'' Violations will be subject to disci- 
plinary action and campus driv- 
ing privileges may be suspended. 

Police Chief Crawford Fick- 
lin said the department's greatest 
concern is the crack down on 
speeders throughout campus. 



Student Union undergoes 
needed renovations 



The Student Union is cur- 
rently undergoing a facelift in 
order to prepare and update the 
building for the fall term. 

The building is slated for 
repainting, recarpcting, renova- 
tion of rooms, new furnishings 
and the addition of an outdoor 
patio area. 

According to Fred Fulton, 
director of Student Life, all large 
public areas such as the lobby, 
hallways, stair wells and dining 
room will receive a new coat of 
paint. Painters are currently paint- 
ing the ceilings in the hallways 
and recently finished repainting 
the Ballroom ceiling. 

The lobby and stair well 
areas will also receive new carpet; 
however, carpet on the walls of the 
stair wells will be removed. New 
lighting fixtures will be placed 
throughout the building. 

In addition to a general 
facelift, the Union is also slated for 
major renovation in the Cane 
River Room and the President's 
Room located on the second floor. 

The President's Room will 
bcenlargcd to include the Queen's 
Room and the Faculty Lounge 
which arc currently located on 
both sides. The walls will be re- 
moved to expand the President's 
Room. 

Marilyn Haley, recruiter/ 
counselor, has been placed in 
charge of furnishing and decorat- 
ing the room. Haley said the 
President's Room will be de- 
signed to provide a formal dining 
area for use by students, faculty, 
staff, and outside groups wishing 
to reserve the room. 

"The President s and Cane 
River rooms will be renovated 



from top to bottom," Haley said. 
"The rooms will have new carpet, 
the paneling will be replaced with 
wallpaper and new furniture will 
be brought in." 

Haley said the President's 
Room will be decorated in a laven- 
der and creme scheme and will 
contain replicas of the three tradi- 
tional columns. The room is being 
expanded in order to accommo- 
date groups that are too large for 
current facilities and too small for 
the Ballroom. The President's 
room will seat about 100 people. 

"The President's Room will 
be a nice, formal place for ban- 
quets and dinners to be held," 
Haley said. 

In addition to an internal 
facelift, the Union is slated for an 
external facelift as well. The court- 
yard area in front of the Union will 
be resurfaced with a stone epoxy 
aggregate similar to the new pool 
deck at the Recreation Complex. 

The courtyard will also con- 
tain stone planters for various 
plants and outdoor furniture in 
order to create a cafe effect. 

Scheduled to be completed 
before the fall term, the bids for the 
renovation projects arc expected 
in by next week, with work begin- 
ning the following week. Project 
costs will be revealed at that time. 

Upon the finalization of the 
new bookstore and food service 
contracts the Student Union could 
be in for more changes and reno- 
vations, Fulton said. Changes in 
thediningarca and bookstore area 
have been discussed but are on 
hold pending contract agree- 
ments. 

Plans for the vacant area on 
the first floor of the Student Union 



are also on hold. Once housing the 
bowling alley, the large area has 
been the topic of discussion for the 
Student Activities Board since the 
bowling equipment was sold last 
winter. 

According to Kenneth 
Holmes, program adviser for Stu- 
dent Activities Board, the SAB has 
discussed turning the vacant area 
into an entertainment room simi- 
lar to the current Union Station. 
The area housing the Union Sta- 
tion will be converted into a sit- 
down eating area serving such 
items as beer and nachos. 

First floor renovation plans 
are also pending the food service 
contracts. Bookstore and food 
service contracts are expected to 
be completed in early August, 
Fulton said. 



LISA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 



Editor addresses 
holiday dormitory 

explosion. 
See page 3 for details. 



"During the spring 
semester we surveyed thecampus 
for one day and logged in the driv- 
ing speed of automobiles on cam- 
pus. The survey indicated that the 
commuters were driving between 
48 and 75 mph on campus. This 
situation isdangerousand we will 
no longer tolerate it," Ficklin said. 

Ficklin said in order to con- 
trol speeders, 1 5 mph, 25 mph, and 
35 mph speed zones will be desig- 
nated across campus. Due to 
heavy pedestrian traffic, several 
15 mph zones have been desig- 
nated and will be closely moni- 
tored. 

The new 15 mph pedestrian 
zones will be indicated by flashing 
warning beacons at the start of 
each boundary. Designated zones 
along Sam Sibley Drive include 
the east end of Rapides Hall, 
across from the Student Union, 
and on the north side of Roy Hall. 
On Central Avenue a zone will be 
placed on the east end of Varnado 
Hall. A zone will also be marked 
on Amulet Street in front of the 
police station Ficklin said. 

Zone beacons will be flash- 
ing Monday through Friday from 
7a.m. to 2 p.m. "Once a pedestrian 
leaves a curve, after giving a 
moving car ample time to recog- 
nize the situation, he or she has the 
right to cross in the crosswalk," 
Ficklin said. "The driver will be 
warned of the pedestrian's pres- 
ence through the means of the 
blinker zone. There is no excuse 
available for speeding through 
this area." 

Ficklin said enforcement of 
most violations, except the pedes- 



trian zone violations, will be 
rather lenient the first week of the 
fall semester. 

"I will allow about a 5 mph 
grace zone for the first week and 
also instigate warning tickets, all 
in order to warn the students that 
these policies now exist." 

Moreau said campus police 
have the option to issue either a 
state or a campus violation de- 
pendingon the caliber of the viola- 
tion and the discretion of the offi- 
cer. State charges will be issued 
regarding all DVVI and accident 
cases. 

Other aspects of traffic 
regulation which the department 
plans to instigate include speed 
bumps placed in heavy pedestrian 
zones. The mounds will be placed 
in the same areas as the flashing 
beacons, but also in trouble spots 
throughout campus where speed- 
ing has been consistent. 

Ficklin also plans to utilize 
student workers in issuing park- 
ing tickets. 

"We are about four people 
short in this police department. 
We are trying to utilize our man 
power (police officers) for the 
more important aspects of police 
protection," Ficklin said. 

"I don't think the students 
as a whole are going to suffer over 
our new policies. We have a small 
number of traffic violators on this 
campus. I would predict that in n 
two-week time period, we can 
convince these few violators to 
slowdown," Ficklin said. 

GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 




Thorn resigns from administrative post 



NSU Vice President, Dr. 
Dale Thorn resigned unexpect- 
edly yesterday for personal rea- 
sons. Dr. Thorn, who was 
unavailable for comment, left a 
letter of resignation for President 
Alost. Alost accepted the resigna- 
tion. 

According to jerry Pierce, 
executive assistant to the presi- 
dent, Dr. Alost addressed a meet- 
ing of department heads and 
deans with the resignation. Pierce 
said' that Alost expressed his re- 
gret over the loss. 

Alost restated his regrets and said 
that he is now taking applications 
to fill the position. "I have placed 
an advertisement in the Chron- 
icle/' Alost said. "I hope to have 
the position filled before Septem- 
ber 1." 

Alost said that he hopes he 



can fill the position witha member career include press secretary for 
of NSU personnel. The individual the governor of Louisiana (Ed- 
will be selected by a committee, wards) from 1972 to 1973; admin- 
Dr. Thorn occupied the jstrative/legislative assistant foraj 



position of \ 
lulv of 1986. 



He sen 



inc 



Thorn 
and master's 
ana State Un 
ate from Floi 
The highhgh 
tionadminis 
such rositio 



?nor of 



Regents in 19. 
president at F 
sityinl983,an 
si oner for adi 
Louisiana Bo.' 
1977-1980. 

Other h 



:duca- { 
ird of i 



Univer- 
commis- 



Congressman from 1970 tc 
i72 and state capital correspon- 
ent for the Shreveport Times and 
lonroc News-Star- World from 
267-1970. 

Within his career at North- 
western Thorn was recognized for 
is efforts as mentor in the drive to 
btairi the Louisiana Scholars' 
Allege through the Board of 
'egents, He was also responsible 
ir strengthening North western's 
journalism department, by acquir- 
ing a computcrizd journalism 
writing laboratory, and devoting 
his own time to instruct a 400-level 
journalism class. , 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 



PAGE 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



JULY 7, 1987 




FROM THE NEWSROOM 



Chadick named director 
of Scholars' College 



Northwestern State Univer- 
sity mathematics professor Dr. 
Stan Chadick has been appointed 
acting director of the Louisiana 
Scholars' College for the Liberal 
Arts and Sciences, which will en- 
roll its first class in the fall of 1987. 
Chadick's appointment, which 
becomes effective immediately, 
was announced by President 
Robert Most. 

Chadick hasbeen a member 
of the Northwestern mathematics 
faculty for 16 years, including five 
years as department chairman. 
His tenure at Northwestern began 
in the fall of 1969, which was inter- 
rupted for two years when he 
served from 1983 to 1985 as cur- 
riculum coordinator for the Lou- 



isiana School for Math, Science 
and the Arts. 

Chadick holds three de- 
grees in mathematics: the 
bachelor's degree from the Uni- 
versity of Central Arkansas, the 
master's degree from the Univer- 
sity of Arkansas and the doctorate 
from the University of Tennessee. 

Recognized as a leader in 
mathematics education at state 
and national levels, Chadick was 
presented Northwestcrn's Distin- 
guished Faculty Chair Award 
during 1986 winter commence- 
ment exercises last December. 

Chadick was a member of 
the Northwestern team which 
prepared the comprehensive pro- 
posal for the establishment of the 



Louisiana Scholars' College. 

Chadick was a co-author 
last year of a position paper for the 
Louisiana Association of Teachers 
of Mathematics on mathematic 
requirements for high school 
graduation. He also spoke re- 
cently at the Conference for the 
Advancement of Mathematics 
Teaching in Austin, Tex., and at 
the national meeting of the Na- 
tional Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics in Washington, DC. 

Chadick is a past-president 
of the Louisiana Association of 
Teachers of Mathematics, serving 
a one-year term in 1986. 

JIM JOHNSON 

Contributing Writer 



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Northwestern's Department of Chemistry, Physics, and Geology has purchased 
a telescope at the estimated cost of $10,000. The Celestron 14 telescope is housed 
in the new observatory in Fournet Hall. 



Task force studies computer facilities 



m 



It all t 

tice in the i 
lersity Polic 
n," 

It beca 
lice were : 
I us holding 
I ling a hairc 
It becc 
iludcnts we 
. ctually writ 
ig on camp 
At firs 
olicc were 
jttledid we 
ic arm moti 
yaves. Hoi 
faved back 
long. 

Thent 
nore dignifi 
tudents o\ 
hough the f 
ffective for 
hey sometii 
rick. I know 



A University task force has 
been meeting the past two weeks 
in order to gather questions and 
answers about a new computer 
center for Northwestern. 

Issues pertaining to personnel 
records, registration, financial aid, 
and admissions and recruiting 
were discussed with reference to 
complaints about the present 
computer system. According to 
the report submitted by the study 
team, computer hardware, soft- 
ware, and untrained personnel 
were deemed as problems of the 
present system. 

"The idea behind the study is to 
first look at the requirements of 
the hardware and software, then 
look at the issues and what equip- 
ment would best fit them," said 
Georgia Bcasley, chairperson of 
the IBM Computer Center Study 
Team. 

After interviewing personnel 
from each area, the team reached 
several conclusions concerning 
the present needs of the system. 
According to Beasley the needs 
were almost identical in every 
situation. 



Each division was asked to 
compose a questionnaire which 
would be sent to three computer 
vendors. The questionnaires in- 
cluded 29 statements from each of 
the four areas. 

According to Bcasley the 
seven most important responses 
included updating, technical sup- 
port, news releases, technical 
training, maintenance costs, opti- 
cal scanning, and interfacing of 
software. 

The three vendors that are con- 
sidering proposals for updating 
the current system are Systems 
and Computer Technology (SCT), 
Computer Management and De- 
veloping Services (CMDS), and 
Information Associates (IA), Bea- 
sley said. SCT will be on campus 
Tuesday, July 7, for their presenta- 
tion with CMDS scheduled for 
Wednesday and IA for Thursday. 

"Next week, the NSU team will 
be traveling to USL in Lafayette to 
see the SCT system in action," 
Bcasley said. 

Northwestern, which iscur- 
rcn tly using the I A system, is look- 



ing for a nearby campus using the 
CMDS system in order to study it 
also. 

The study team assisting Bca- 
sley consists of six members in- 
cluding Warren Massia, Lynda 
Tabor, Terry Faust, Gil Gilson, Bob 
Gaddis, and Cecil Knotts. The 
four consulting members to the 
force were Dr. Mildred Bailey, 
Graduate Dean; Dr. Edward Gra- 
ham, Dean of Instruction; Dr. Ray 
Baumgardncr, Provost of Fort 
Polk; and Dr. Stan Chadick, Act- j 
ing Director of the Louisiana 
Scholar's College. 

"We are going to come out of 
the study with recommendations I 
for Dr. Alost as to what we feel 1 
should be done about our com- 
puter services," Beasley said. 

The committee will submit 
their final report on the study Fri- : 
day, July 17. Dates for installation 
and budgets for the project will be 
determined following the final 
report. 

NAN GOSS 

Staff Writer 



Stai 



its 

Dr. 

uni 

1 

Noi 
con 
the 
star 

1 

jou 
dec 
ins 
ims 



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987 



PAGE 3 



CURRENT SAUCE 



JULY 7, 1987 



M ON OUR MINDS 



irehased 
housed 



The day of the underdog has finally 
arrived.. and I surrender 



It all began with a subtle 
totice in the Current Sauce, "Uni- 
lersity Police to receive radar 
Rin," 

It became noticeable when 
lolice were spotted around cam- 
lus holding out an object resem- 
Hing a hair dryer. 

It became a reality when 
Jtudents were pulled over and 
jctually written tickets for speed- 
Itg on campus. 

At first we all thought the 
|olice were just being friendly, 
jttledid we know that those fran- 
ic arm motions were not merely 
yaves. However, we all just 
(raved back and kept speeding 
long. 

Then the pol ice resorted to a 
nore dignified means of pulling 
itudents over -flashlights. Al- 
hough the flashlights were more 
ffective for night use, even then 
hey sometimes failed to do the 
rick. I know of one girl who saw 



the police waving the flashlightsat 
her and mistook it for traffic di- 
recting. "I thought that there must 
have been some accident or some- 
thing and that they were directing 
me away from Prudhomme," the 
confused student stated. 

Although some students 
have been incensed by the ticket 
writing and recent traffic changes, 
others have been grateful. These 
grateful students are the ones 
known as pedestrians. 

The pedestrian is the stu- 
dent who is going to school at 
Northwestern without a car or 
some other means of transporta- 
tion. This person can usually be 
spotted trudging across campus 
with a backpack stuffed with 20 
pounds of books. 

Perhaps you've seen this 
student patiently waiting beside 
the road for a chance to race acrot s 
between cars. Or maybe you've 
seen him actually walking from 



Bossier Hall to the Student Union 
(we students with cars would 
never undertake a trek of that dis- 
tance). 

Things have changed now. 
It appears that the pedestrians' 
day has arrived. No longer will the 
campus be another Indy 500. It 
may even become known as a 
sneaker or loafer college. Cars and 
trucks will have to stop and yield 
to a more common means of trans- 
portation -the shoe. Drivers will 
have to drive at a reasonable rate 
of speed and (heaven forbid) be 
courteous to pedestrians. 

Effective August 1, Univer- 
sity Police will intensify their ef- 
forts to control speeding on cam- 
pus. The general rate of speed will 
be 25 miles per hour. However, the 
police have designated several 
high-pedestrian traffic zones in 
which the limit will be 15 miles per 
hour. 

The 25 mph limit is nothing 



new to Northwestern. The limit, 
which has been in effect for some 
time, has rarely been enforced. 
The only ones who have ever both- 
ered following the limit have been 
the maintenance men. These guys 
are the misinformed men in the 
white campus trucks who think 
the whole campus is under a 15 
mph limit. 

Although it's high time the 
speeding situation was brought 
under control, I myself fear the 
thought of getting a $25 ticket. I am 
also facing another dilemma. The 
25 mph limit does not fit my ve- 
hicle. I am forced to either drive 
along in third gear with my motor 
screaming or to sputter along in 
fourth. At 25 mph there is no 
happy medium. 

It looks as if I'll just have to 
dig out my sturdy shoes, my back- 
pack and join the growing ranks of 
the walking student. 




r 





LA<oT 
COMPLETELY 

UNNECESSARY 
FOR 



35 MiLES 




h w 



c ■ -sa * '_;■■■.«•■■ ui Pfttss Syodiole 



1-\5S 



LISA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 



pus using the 
ler to study it 

issisting Bca- 
mcmbers in- 
issia, Lynda 
ilGilson,Bob 
Knotts. The 
rtbers to the 
dred Bailey, 
Edward Gfa- 
:tion; Dr. Ray 
r ost of Fort 
"hadick, Art- 
ie Louisiana 

i come ou t of 
nmenda lions 
what we feci 
>ut our com- 
;ley said. 
; will submit 
the study Fri- 
>r installation 
project will be 
ng the final 



NAN GOSS 

Staff Writer 



urts, 
Lmill, 



e, or 
. goals 



rnhirs 



Staff commends Thorn 



Is there really no 



place like home? 



The staff of this newspaper express 
its deep regrets over the resignation of 
Dr. Thorn as vice president of this 
university. 

Dr. Thorn was a valuable asset for 
Northwestern. He reflected genuine 
concern for the academic progress of 
the student and for the educational 
standards of Northwestern. 

He will be deeply missed in the 
journalism department where his 
dedicated effort in enhancing the 
instruction of journalism was 
unsurpassed. 



There was a different type of 
explosion in Bossier Hall over the 

Fourth of July holidays it was 

an explosion of irresponsibility. 
There were many — too many — 
students who recognized and 
exploited this dangerous firework 
at the expense of those who think 
dorm living should be, at the least, 
civilized. 

It was quite obvious to me 
by witnessing destroyed vending 
machines, overturned furniture, 
exceptionally loud voices and fre- 
quently pulled fire alarms that 
there was in fact little or no super- 
vision in effect over the four-day 
holiday. 

At first I was angered at the 
fact that there was no R.A. or 
administrative figure present to 
keep the destructive mayhem at 
bay, but then I asked myself -as I 
do now- why should there be the 



need for the policing of a college 
dormitory? 

Did any of the ignorant, 
mentally docile jackasses, who are 
responsible for the vandalism and 
disruption in Bossier Hall, hear 
the question put forward? Per- 
haps this question will clarify the 
issue: why are you in college? 

It is obvious to me that 
somewhere down the line a few 
high school punks were content 
on having a chip on their shoulder 
and algae in their brains. They 
carried their neanderthal train of 
thought through the gates of 
Northwestern and display it bril- 
liantly, almost every night, 
through their childish pranks and 
attitudes. 

Do 1 appear a little per- 
turbed? Consider that around 200 
to 400 bright high school students 
will be knocking on the gates of 



Northwestern -thanks to a mas- 
sive recruiting drive for both the 
Scholars' College and NSU- and I 
do not wish these irresponsible 
jerks to be part of the welcome 
wagon. 

These students will be a 
valuable asset to NSU. It is our 
responsibility as veteran students 
to show these newcomers that 
NSU supplies an excellent college 
environment both inside and out- 
side of the classroom. I have yet to 
see the dormitory life at this insti- 
tution meet the qualifications as 
an excellent college environment. 

We the students have no 
one to blame but ourselves. Per- 
haps it is time that a few respon- 
sible college students take matters 
into their own hands. 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 



HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? 

WRITE A LETTER TO THE EDITOR 



THIS WEEK'S QUESTION: 



What would you be doing now had you 
not chosen to attend summer session? 





i 






fcfrain Ribot 

GR, Microbiology 

Puerto Ric° 

"1 think I would go home and 
lay down on the beach, and do a little 
tyork in my family's restaurant." 



Rhonda Angely 

SR, Nursing 

Stonewall, LA 

"I think 1 would work in a 
hospital in Shreveport for the sum- 



Francine Hebert 

JR, Microbiology 

Houma, LA 

"l would be spending several 
nights at Roxanne's Bar ,off of Bour- 



mcr, Then 1 would go to Florida for a ban Street in New Orleans, with my 

week. I would go to Disneyworld, beatnik friends from high school." 
Fort Walton Beach and Daytona 
Beach." 



Sharon White 

SR, Biology Education 

Benton, LA 

"I would be working at the 
Pierre Bossier Mall part time, or 
partying on Cypress Beach." 



Kenneth Holmes 

GR, Student Personnel 
Services 

Savannah, GA 

"I would probably be at home, 
in Savannah, Georgia, in the lake fish- 
ing with my dog Rex." 



CURRENT SAUCE 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 

USA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 

STEVE HORTON 

News Editor 

NAN GOSS 
SONYA RIGAUD 

Staff Writers 

ALLEN EVANS 

Advertising Manager 

EDD LEE 

Circulation/Distribution 

CHARLOTTE RUSH 

Photo Editor 

TOM WHITEHEAD 

Adviser 



The Current Sauce is 
published every two weeks 
during the summer 
semester by the students of 
Northwestern State Univer- 
sity of Louisiana. It is not 
associated with any of the 
university's departments 
and is financed indepen- 
dently. 

Current Sauce is 
based in the Office of Stu- 
dent Publications located 
in Kyser Hall. The office of 
the editorial staff is 225A. 
telephone (318) 357-5456. 
The adviser's office is 103 
Kyser Hall, telephone 357- 
5213. 

The mailing address 
forthe Current Sauce is P.O. 
Box 5306, NSU, 
Natchitoches, LA 71497. 

All correspondence, 
including letters to the edi- 
tor is welcome. Material 
submitted for consideration 
must be mailed to the 
above address or brought 
to the office. 

The deadline for all 
advertising and copy is the 
Friday before Tuesday pub- 
lication by 9 a.m. Inclusion 
of any and all material is left 
to the discretion of the edi- 
tor. 

Letters to the editor 

should be typed (double- 
spaced) and signed, and 
should include a telephone 
number where the writer 
can be reached No 
anonymous letters will be 
printed. 

Current Sauce sub- 
scription rates are $11 per 
academic year (26 issues) or 
$6 per semester ( 1 2 issues). 
The paper is entered as 
second-class mail at 
Natchitoches, LA. The USPS 
number is 140-660/ 



AROUND CAMPUS 



Academic skills workshop 

All students enrolled in at 
least one developmental educa- 
tion course, such as English 0910 
or 0920, Math 0910 or 0920, and 
Reading 0900, 0910, or 0920, are 
invited to attend special skills 
workshops that are being pre- 
sented by the Department of Spe- 
cial Services. All freshmen enter- 
ing for the first time at NSU are 
also urged to attend. 

Dates for the workshops 

are: 

July 7th — Outlining, Sum- 
marizing, Paraphrasing — at 3:30 
p.m., in Room 243 of Kyser Hall. 

July 15th — Becoming Test- 
Wise — at 3:30 p.m., in Room 243 of 
Kyser Hall. 

For more information about 
the academic skills workshop 
contact Mary Dillard, Director of 



Workshop 

A scries of four free work- 
shops entitled "Marketing and 
Public Relations for Retail Busi- 
nesses" will be conducted on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays, July 
7,9,14 and 16, at NSU. 

The Natchitoches Area 
Chamber of Commerce and the 
Small Business Development 
Center at NSU are co-sponsoring 
the workshop sessions, which are 
scheduled from 7 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. 
in Room 108 of the NSU Business 
Building. 

The workshop speaker will 
be NSU marketing professor Dr. 
Barry Smiley, director of the Small 
Business Development Center at 
NSU and a recognized business 
consultant. 

According to Smiley, the 
workshop sessions have been 



inisscheduledfor2p h m.,atwhich ]S/fc/ZOZflS dCCeijtS 
time the entries will be judged on x * f 

food service 



Special Services, in Room 104 of designed to help retail merchants 
Kyser Hall, or telephone her at: 
357-5901. 



Academic interviews 

Special Services located in 
104 Kyser Hall is now making 
appointments for academic inter- 
views. Northwestern students are 
invited to make an appointment 
with a counselor to discuss goals 
and objectives of the university 
career, majorsand how to choose a 
major, fall semester plans, and to 
learn what is available through 
Special Services. Students from all 
academic levels are invited to 
participate in the program. 

Name change 

The College Success Office, 
located in 104 Kyser Hall, has 
changed their department title to 
the Office of Academic Support 
Services, in order to avoid confu- 
sion over the old title. Members of 
the Academic Support Services 
staff said the new name will help 
clarify that services offered in the 
department are different from 
those of other offices accross cam- 
pus; such as student services and 
personal counseling. 

Staff members also said the 



in such areas as modern market- 
ing and public relations, identify- 
ing target markets, marketing re- 
search and marketing mix devel- 
opment. 

To prc-rcgistcr or obtain 
further information on the series 
of free workshops, call the Small 
Business Development Center at 
NSU: (318) 357-5858, or the 
Natchitoches Area Chamber of 
Commerce: (318) 352-4411. 

Chili cook-off 

The Louisiana Folklife Cen- 
ter at Northwestern State Univer- 
sity is accepting entries from local 
and regional cooks for the first 
annual Natchitoches-Northwest- 
ern Folk Festival Chili Cook-off to 
be held Saturday, July 18, at 
Prather Coliseum. 

The chili cook-off, con- 



the basis of aroma, color, consis- 
tency, taste and aftertaste. 

Coordinating the chili cook- 
off is Dr. Sally Hunt, Northwest- 
ern home economics faculty, who 
is an active participant in CASI 
competitions. "No fillers such as 
beans, macaroni, rice, hominy, or 
similar items will be acceptable," 
said Hunt, adding, "All chili must 
be cooked on site the day of the 
cook-off from scratch, which 
means that each cook must start 
with raw meat." 

Beginning at 1:30 p.m. on 
Saturday, tasting cups of chili will 
be sold for $1 by each of the partici- 
pating chili cook-off teams. 

In addition to the 
chili,which will be cooked on 
Coleman stoves in the cooking 
area located in the coliseum's east 
side parking lot, each chili team 
will be judged for showmanship 
on the basis of theme, costume, 
booth set-up, action and audience 
appeal. 

To enter the cook-off, con- 
tact the Louisiana Folklife Center 
at 352-4411. 



SAB movie 

The Student Activities 
Board will be showing the movie 
"Critical Condition" this Wednes- 
day, at 7:30 p.m. in the Union Sta- 
tion. Beer, wine coolers, soft 
drinks and snacks will be avail- 
able. 

The movie "9 1/2 Weeks" 
may be viewed in the Addition 
during the week of July 5-12. The 
movie "Teen Wolf" will be in the 
Addition during the week of July 
ducted according to rules of the 13-17, and will also be shown July 
Chili Appreciation Society Inter- 15, at 7:30 p.m. in Union Station, 
national, Inc. (CASI), is being pre- 
sented as one of the attractions of 
the eighth annual Natchitoches- 
Northwestern Folk Festival, 
which is scheduled for July 17-19 
in Prather Coliseum. 

Entry fees are $15 per team 
with the first 30 entries receiving 



promotion 



Linda Nicholas, who has 
served as the cash and catering 
unit manager for Professional 
Food Management (PFM) food 
service at Northwestern, has re- 
cently been promoted to senior 
food service director. 

Nicholas will be transfer- 
ring to Emmanuel College, a 
Catholic school in Boston, Mass., 
where the student union caters to 
about the same number of stu- 
dents as Northwestern. 

"I'm excited, but I'm a little 
scared," Nicholas said. "It's really 
hard moving to a new town and 
making all new friends." 

Nicholas, who is originally 
from Rhode Island, said she is 
pleased to be moving closer to her 
family. 

"I have enjoyed being here 
at Northwestern." Nicholas said. 
"I love Nathcitoches and the 
people here. I am the type of per- 
son that really likes to get involved 
with the students wherever I go. I 
have really been given the oppor- 
tunity here, especially with SAB 
and the SGA." 

Nicholas has worked at 
Northwestern for the past seven 
years, two years for SAGA food 
service and five for PFM. 

"Everyone come visit me in 
Boston," Nicholas said. 

SONYA RIGAUD 

Staff Writer 




NOR 



1 




new name will identify the office two free passes to the Folk Festival 
asonethathelpsstudentsbyoffer- Friday night music show, the Sat- 
ing such services as academic urday daytime session and two 
counseling, study skills work- festival T-shirts. 



shops, and tutoring in a variety of 
subjects. 



Academic skills course 

The office of Academic 
Support Services will replace the 
College Success 0900 course with a 
new course titled: Academic Skills 
1010. Academic Skills 1010 is of- 
fered for one credit hour to any 
student who feels a need to im- 
prove his or her study skills. Any 
entering freshman with a high 
school GPA of 2.0 or below is en- 
couraged to enroll. All students in 
developmental English, math and 
reading are also strongly urged to 
take the course 

Course topics include goal 
setting, time management, note 
taking for lectures and textbooks, 
improving concentration, and test 
taking skills. 

For more information, con- 
tact the Academic Support Serv- 
ices Office at 104 Kyser Hall. 

Summer tutoring 

The Academic Support 
Service Office will be offering tu- 
toring, in a variety of subjects, for 
the remainder of the summer ses- 
sion. The office will also aid in the 
formation of study groups for 
various study topics. 

More information may be 
obtained in room 104 of Kyser 
Hall, or by calling 357-5901 . 



KNWD 



The cook-off will begin at 10 
a.m. with a cook's meeting, in 
which final instructions will be 
given byCASI officials. Chili turn- 



1987 POTPOURRI 

Distributed Thursdays 
1-3 p.m. 
227 Kyser Hall 



NSU food service manager Linda Nicholas receives a 
key to the city from Mayor Joe Sampite. Nicholas is 
leaving Northwestern to accept a new position in 
Boston, Massachusetts. 



HOLY GROSS 
CATHOLIC 
CHURCH 

CATHOLIC S TUDENT CENTER 

MASSES 
Saturday 4:30 pm 
Sunday 10:30 & 6:00 
Weekdays at 5:00 pm 

ALL STUDENTS 
AND 

FACULTY WELCOME 

129 SECOND STREET 
352-2615 

PRAYER MEETING: WEDNESDAY AT 7 P.M. 



Quys and Qals 

July Specials 
Hair cuts $6.00 Perms $30.00 
Sun glitz $25.00 Minking $25.00 

Highlighting $12.00 
Tanning Specials 20 visits/$40.00 

SiK. operators to serve you 
Open Monday thru Jriday 9 until 
Located in front of the Student Union Thone 357-5451 



BOBBY WAGGONER, R.PH. 



UNIVERSITY PHARMACY 

and Gift Shop 



Houn: 8:(X) 



926 Coll eje Atenuf 
N.tcKitocKc. LA 7H;')7 



<o 6:(X) 



p.m. 



.Monday - S»turii»r 



Telephone 

318/352-97-10 

After Hour* 352-761 6 



-CREATIVE FlVh 



Look for a new look in 
alternative rock this foil 

9 1.7 FM 



Johnny's Restaurant 

Located in the El Camino across from NSU 

Open from 6 a.m. - 10 p.m., 7 days a week 

Complete menu and short orders, great burgers 
Lunches served daily except Saturday 
Breakfast served anytime 
Takeout orders welcome 

NSU students, faculty, and staff welcome! 
Phone 352-4426 

10% off anything on the menu with this ad! 




Hwy. 1 
By-Pass 
Natchitoches, LA 



COOL DOWN... 



Cotton Patch 





M I 
TORNADO 

OFDM 24 HOURS 



Phone In Orders Welcome 



357-8198 



IFy;. >, 



dios, 

Th 



"I was so c 
ing to mov 
hristina cou 
ib and wc ^ 
imily again, 
as come to g 
* ady," saidl^ 
Dr. and N 
ann and 
ristina will 
dNatehitoc 
ter giving o 
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language £ 
not the fin 
ve made. 

The Br< 
atehitoches 
ey fled fror 
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ear-old dau 
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«y tourist 
iirned. 

The Brodc 
ave their I 
astro and 
rcre winninj 
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ted bctwee 
(id Cuba, ar 
'ere free to 1 
Dr. Bra 
revious trip: 
efore they d 
made aboi 
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In Cuba, 
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"We lost c 
money wl 
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noughts? I 
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previous 
'urrent Sauce 
"All 
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Breakfast Menu Served From 12:00 am til 11:00 am 
ALL OTHER ITEMS SERVED 24 HOURS A DAY!! 




Avi 



More 
athercd on 
us this wet 
rtnual Folk ] 
ton Hatley, 
sstival. 

With t 
ouisiana A 
eatured air 
'lays, films, 
raftsmen. 

Linin 
thaplin's U 
foeairshows 
fractions a 
(lerobaticsta 
Report and 
the Royal A 
arricr, als 
|ump Jet, p 
Attraction a 1 
its power a 
ties. 

In the 
jhungry visi 
i<\ic foods a: 
and rice, i 
iKoasati ln< 
! sandwiches 
Out 
Saturday, 
from the fir 



JULY 21, 1987 




VOL 76 NO. 4 



CURRENTS 




NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA 



NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 71497 



\dios, Northwestern! 



The Brodermanns pack up for retirement in Miami 



"I was so excited that we were 
ing to move to Miami so that 
hristina could find the perfect 
ib and we would be with our 
imily again. Now that the time 
,as come to go, I wonder if I am 
ady," saidNohelyBrodermann. 

Dr. and Mrs. Ramon Broder- 
pnn and their daughter 
ristina will leave Northwestern 
idNatchitochcsatthe end of July 
tcr giving over 1,000 students a 
sic understanding of the Span- 
language and culture. But this 
not the first major move they 
ve made. 

The Brodermanns came to 
latchitoches about six years after 
icy fled from Cuba under Fidel 
!astro's reign. The Cuban native, 
is wife Nohcly, and their four- 
ear-old daughter Christina left 
le island in October 1960 on a 29- 
ay tourist visa and never re- 
irned. 

The Brodcrmann's decision to 
ave their homeland came as 
astro and his guerrilla army 
rcre winning the war to control 
ic Cuban government. At that 
me, diplomatic relations still cx- 
tcd between the United States 
lid Cuba, and the Brodermanns 
ere free to leave on visas. 

Dr. Brodermann had made 
revious trips to the United States 
jfore they decided to move here, 
made about 10 visits," he said, 
»en added, 'Three were for busi- 
ess and the others were to see a 
lotball game or a special fight." 

In Cuba, Brodermann was a 
rominent lawyer enjoying a 
| Dod life. He left his entire estate, 
ccept belongings, lending him- 
:lf to the pretense of his vacation. 
"We lost everything. But what 
money when the government 
ies to control your very 
oughts? I would rather sweep 
reets in the United States than go 
ck to Castro's Cuba," he said in 
previous interview with the 

urrent Sauce. 

"All we were allowed to 
ring to the United States was $1 50 
cr traveler, so Nohcly, Christina, 
nd myself lived on $450 for a long 
irhile," Dr. Brodermann said. 

They were soon penniless, 
irs. Brodermann decided to 
irrite President John F. Kennedy 
5 tell him of their plight. 

Shortly after the President re- 
cived the letter, Dr. Brodermann 



Aviation attractions bring thousands to festival 



was hired as a U. S. Health, Educa- 
tion and Welfare Department so- 
cial worker to assist other Cuban 
refugees and exiles. 

After being settled in the 
United States for more than a year, 
both decided to continue work on 
their educations that they had 
begun in Cuba. At the University 
of Havana, Dr. Brodermann 
earned the bachelor's of arts de- 
gree, bachelor's of science degree, 
the master's of science degree in 
diplomatic and consular law, and 
the doctorate of philosophy de- 
gree in political, social, and eco- 
nomic sciences. 

In the United States Dr. Brod- 
ermann earned the bachelor's of 
arts degree and master's of science 
degree in Spanish from Indiana 
State University, and a doctorate 
of philosophy in Spanish gram- 
mar and literature from Florida 
State University. 

In 1975 he even began to work 
on his American doctorate of law 
degree, and in early 1978 he re- 
ceived the Juris Doctor degree, his 
fourth doctoral degree and ninth 
college degree. Mrs. Brodermann 
earned the bachelor's of arts de- 
gree in Cuba and the master's of 
science degree in Spanish from 
Stephen F. Austin University and 
the master's of science degree in 
social sciences from Northwestern 
State University. 

In 1965 the Brodermanns 
moved to New Orleans where Dr. 
Brodermann taught Spanish at 
DeLaSalle High School, After one 
year they decided to move to 
Natchitoches and both accepted 
positions at Northwestern to teach 
Spanish and Latin American his- 
tory. 

Once in Louisiana, the Broder- 
manns felt like it was their home. 
Four years later they applied for 
U.S. citizenship. Mrs. Broder- 
mann said their decision to be- 
come U.S. citizens "was triggered 
when Nixon was elected president 
because he was a friend of the 
Cubans. He was our friend." 
After receiving their citizenship in 
1970 Mrs. Brodermann once again 
wrote to the President,, but this 
time to Nixon, telling him "how 
proud they were to be Ameri- 
cans." "It is the only land in the 
world to give help to refugees 
from all over the world. Ameri- 
cans accept them with open arms, 



and we are grateful." 

Both have been on the faculty at 
Northwestern since 1966. Dr. 
Brodermann retired in early 1984 
to accept a position at the Louisi- 
ana School. "I left Northwestern 
to establish a strong Spanish cur- 
riculum at the Louisiana School. It 
was such a gratifying experience 
for me to teach the crcam-of-the 
crop students in Louisiana. I en- 
joyed every minute of my time 
there. I have never enjoyed teach- 
ing as much as I did there, since the 
student's desire for learning is so 
high- 
Mrs. Brodermann agreed. She 
taught elementary Spanish 
courses a t the Louisiana School for 
three years while teaching Span- 
ish at Northwestern. 

"They kept me so busy. They 
were always ahead which kept me 
on my toes. They had a sincere 
interest in the language." 

Mrs. Brodermann is now com- 
pleting her last semester of at 
Northwestern, teaching elemen- 
tary, intermediate, and advanced 
Spanish courses to over 75 stu- 
dents this summer. With the help 
of Dr. Brodermann, she managed 
to take on a heavy load. 

Both agree that colleges and 
high schools should offer a varied 
range of language programs. 
They also understand the prob- 
lems students have in learning 
them. 

"The environment is against 
you," said Dr. Brodermann. "All 
you hear is English. You attend 
your Spanish class for only three 
hours per week. It is difficult to 
catch the pronunciation of all the 
words. Now for Spanish majors, 
that's a different story. I expect so 
much more from them. After all, 
they will be the teachers of Span- 
ish in the future. The language 
rests in their hands." 

The Brodermanns have unique 
personalities which make them 
well known and respected among 
their students and peers. 

Mrs. Brodermann, the more 
social partner, displays her talents 
in storytelling. "A day does not go 
by without Mrs. Brodermann tell- 
ing us something to make us 
laugh," said Patina Murphy, an 
advanced student. 

"She always told us stories 
about her dog and its strange per- 
sonality, but I never would have 



believed it until I witnessed it in 
her home," said Terri Garrett after 
spending an afternoon with their 
family. 

"When she teaches a lesson she 
always has something to add to 
the lecture which keeps me inter- 
ested," said Danny Anderson. 
"I'm so glad I finished my Spanish 
requirement under her — I got 
three doses of Spanish in one," 
said Eddy Broadway, who is 
scheduled for nine hours of Span- 
ish this summer. 

Alhough her husband is fond 
of all types of sports, she says 
fights are one of her favorites. She 
was quick to add shopping, 
though, and her husband readily 
agreed. "We have a field day at 
Gus Kaplan's," said Terri Garrett. 

Dr. Brodermann has a more dry 
sense of humor. He said that Mrs. 
Brodermann has kept him the 
young man he is today. Dr. Brod- 
ermann was also a softball player. 
In 1954 he played in the World 
Champion Softball game in Min- 
nesota. Dr. Brodermann espe- 
cially enjoys reading, listening to 
classical music and watching 
sports, especially baseball and 
boxing. In his tenure at Louisiana 
School he sponsored two trips for 
his students to see Rome, France 
and England. He was also the 
charter sponsor of the Spanish 
Club while being a member of Phi 
Eta Sigma, Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha 
Mu Gamma, and Sigma Delta Pi, 
which are all honorary societies. 

Their only daughter, Christina, 
is also a graduate of Northwestern 
where she majored in history and 
Spanish. She attended Southern 
Law School and received the Juris 
Doctor degree three years ago. 
Since then she has passed the Lou- 
isiana and Florida bar exams and 
is presently working at Legal Serv- 
ices of Natchitoches. 

"I want to go to Miami because 
the opportunities for a bilingual 
lawyer there are astronomical. 
Since Miami is basically Hispanic, 
agencies need bilingual attorneys 
to assist their clients. I know I can 
find a job there, and I want my 
parents to be with me," Miss Brod- 
ermann said. 

And so the Brodermann family 
prepares to leave Natchitoches 
and follow their daughter to her 
future. "We have lived our lives, 
now we want Christina to find 




Packing Up 
After nearly 25 years of living in Natchitoches, Dr. 

and Mrs. Ramon Brodermann will retire in Miami, 

Florida. Their daughter, Christina, will practice law 

while her parents enjoy the 'easy* life. 



tier's. Natchitoches was a good 
starting place but there is no future 
here for her. We want to stay 
together, so we are going with 
her," Dr. Brodermann said. 

"We want to teach Spanish as 
adjunct professors at the Univer- 
sity of Miami. I would like to also 
be a translator for some agency in 
Miami, if possible," said Dr. Brod- 
ermann. 

"I am tired. I am ready for a rest 
and am anxious to see Christina 
make a success of herself in Mi- 
ami," Mrs. Brodermann said. 

With only one week left of 
classes, Mrs. Brodermann looks 
back on her students for the last 20 
years. "They were all so good and 
special to us. I know they have all 
made successes of themselves." 

"They are both so special to us," 



said Frankie Campbell. "I'll 
surely miss that 'Hola' every 
morning." 

They will definitely be missed. 

STEVE HORTON 

News Editor 



See related 
staff editorial 

on Page 3 



More than 25,000 people 
athered on North western's cam- 
us this weekend for the eighth 
nnual Folk Festival, according to 
>on Hatley, director of the the 
fstival. 

With the theme of Saluting 
ouisiana Aviation, the festival 
Jatured airshows, aviation dis- 
plays, films, aircrafts, exhibits and 
raftsmen. 

Lining the banks of 
Chaplin's Lake, viewers watched 
he airshows which featured such 
fractions as the AV-8B Harrier II, 
lerobaticstar Marion Coleof Shre- 
'eport and his flying circus, and 
he Royal Albanians in Exile. The 
farrier, also referred to as the 
Ump Jet, proved to be the main 
Mtraction awing the crowds with 
«s power and hovering capabili- 

f CS in the Coliseum concourses, 
|hungry visitors selected such eth- 
nic foods as meat pies, red beans 
'and rice, neck bones and rice, 
koasati Indian fry-bread, Italian 
sandwiches and crawfish pics. 

Outside the Coliseum on 
Saturday, tasting cups of chili 
from the first annual Folk Festival 



Chili Cook-off were available. 
Viewing the various chili teams 
cooking booths proved to be as 
exciting as the chili itself. Chili 
teams themes varied from West- 
ern saloons to class acts featuring 
tuxes and evening gowns. 

With more than 40 music 
shows to select from, viewers 
moved from stage to stage view- 
ing such groups as Bruce 
Inside Frather Coliseum, 
viewers gathered to watch various 
bands perform, to get a taste of 
ethnic foods and to view various 
exhibits and craftsmen. Crafts dis- 
plays included basketweaving, 
Mississippi mud sculptures, bead- 
work, metal art figures, wooden 
toys, pottery, and file' grinding. 
Daigrepont's Cajun Band, Law- 
rence Ardoin's French Band, Col- 
lard Greens, and Tinker's Dam. 
Special night music shows fea- 
tured Hadley Castillo and Le 
Cajun Grass, County Switch, and 
the Shreveport German Band. 

During the daytime pro- 
grams, master craftspeople dem- 
onstrated such crafts as Choctaw 
Indian basketry, beadwork, sil- 



verwork, cane syrup making, 
quilting, corn shuck doll making, 
walking stick carving, decoy carv- 
ing, Coushatta Indian wood carv- 
ings, pinestraw basketry, and 
Caddo Indian-style pottery mak- 
ing. 

Aviation exhibits included 
displays by Delta Airlines, the 
National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration, the Louisiana 
Department of Agriculture, the 
Wedell-Williams Museum, South 
Louisiana 99's, Louisiana Model 
Airplane Clubs, Tuskegee 
Airmen, the Federal Aviation 
Administration, theNSU Division 
of Aviation Science, Eastman 
Kodak, and Marion Cole. 

Sponsored and produced 
by the Louisiana Folklife Center, 
the festival is one of the South's 
major tourist attractions. The festi- 
val once again proved to be a suc- 
cess with the Coliseum parking lot 
filled with RVs and cars from 
Louisiana and surrounding states. 

LISA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 




Rookie Pilot 

Emily Allen, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Rodney Allen of the Louisiana School 
for Math, Science, and the Arts, takes a special tour of an army helicopter on 
display at the Folk Festival. 




FROM THE NEWSROOM ( 



Demon football ticket prices 
drop for '87 



Northwestern Demon foot- 
ball fans will be in for a pleasant 
surprise when they go to purchase 
their 1987 tickets, according to 
John Dillon, ticket manager. 

The cost of the tickets has 
been decreased since the 1986 sea- 
son. 

"Our main objective is to 
attract people to the stadium and 
one way to do that is by offering 
lower ticket prices," Dillon said. 

With five home games, the 
Demons will open home play 
against McNeese State on Sept. 1 2. 
Other home games include such 
rivals as North Texas State, Sept. 
19; Northeast, Oct. 3, homecom- 
ing; Jackson State, Nov. 14; and 
Stephen F. Austin, Nov. 21. 

Demon football season tick- 
ets can be purchased for $25, a cut 
of $5 from last year's price. North- 
western faculty and staff can pur- 



chase season tickets for $15. 

Single game tickets are $7 
for reserve seats, $5 for adult gen- 
eral admission and $3 for student 
general admission. The prices re- 
flect a $1 to $2 cut from the 1986 
season. 

"With a competitive team, 
attractive schedule, four of six 
Southland Conference games at 
home, lower ticket prices and the 
installation of new astroturf, we 
feel that we'll have our best home 
attendance this decade," Dillon 
said. 

Season tickets can be pur- 
chased now from the NSU ticket 
office. The office, which is located 
in the Field House, is open from 7 
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday. 

Admission to all home 
games is free with a student NSU 
ID. 



Food Service to change directorship August 4 



Northwestern students will 
notice several changes in each of 
the dining facilities on campiil 
next semester. Professional Food 
Management (PFM) will no longer 
be NSU's food service. 

According to Fred Fulton, di- 
rector of student life, a pre-pro- 
posal food service conference was 
held June 10. Interested compa- 
nies were given the opportunity to 
question administrators about 
University expectations in the 
food service proposals. Valley 
Food Service and ARA Services 
were the only two companies to 
meet the June 22 deadline by sub- 
mitting their proposals to North- 
western. 

Fulton said no decision has 
been made as to which of the 
companies will be North western's 
new food service. In the submitted 



proposals, administrators are 
looking for improvements in fa- 
cilities, quality of food and quality 
of services. 

"These proposals are pres- 
ently being studied. At this point 
we have not chosen one," Fulton 
said. 

The PFM contract expires Au- 
gusts, 1987, with the new contract 
becoming effective August 4. The 
company resuming responsibility 
must sign a fease for a base period 
of five years. 

"During the next calender year 
there will be renovations to the 
dining facilities, both Iberville 
Dining Hall and the Student 
Union Cafeteria, " Fulton said. 

In addition to facility improve- 
ments, Fulton said students 
should expect the quality of the 
food to be upgraded. 



"We expect the presenta- 
tion of the food to be better. We 
think we will have a more diver- 
sified menu," he said. 

NSU employees who currently 
work under PFM will be granted a 
probationary period. If the work- 
ers meet the new company's stan- 
dards, they may be hired perma- 
nently, Fulton explained. 

Fulton also revealed plans for a 
piz^a outlet on campus. Students 
with variable A "and variable B 
meal tickets will be able to use 
their cards for the pizza outlet. 

"It has not yet been deter- 
mined where, but it will probably 
be in Union Station," Fulton said 
of the proposed pizza outlet. 

Fulton also mentioned a 
change in the traditional 15-meal 
ticket plan which sells for $470. 
Students will now be able to pur- 




chase a 14-meal plan for $4Jj 
which will cover seven days i$ 
stead of the original five days. 

"There will no longer h, 
three meals served on Saturday 
That is where the odd mimbei 
comes from. This is because of tfc 
number of people on campjj, 
during the weekends. There wg 
be a brunch and an evening rrt«8 
just like Sunday/' he said. 

"With the 14 meal pUij 
you're expanding the number <j 
days you can use your meal tidcetj 
If you happen to be a person rhaj 
does not eat breakfast, then yod 
can buy a 14 meal plan and it caij 
serve you through seven day$j 
Basically, we're giving the sudenq 
more flexibility," Fulton said j 

Variable A and variable $ 
meal plans will remain the sarqg J 
Sony a Rigaui 



Turpin 

Stadium f s 
needed facelift 

completed 



The Northwestern Demon 
football team will be challenging 
their opponents on new — but not 
so solid — grounds, because of the 
fresh artificial turf and padding 
which is being installed in Turpin 
Stadium. 

According to Athletic Di- 
rector Tynes Hilderbrand, the old 
turf was a safety hazard for the 
football team. 

"The old turf was aproxi- 
mately 12 years old. Most of the 
grass was worn off, from the 10 to 
35 yard lines, all the way to the 
backing," Hilderbrand said. "We 
have had two of our conference 
schools (Southland Conference) 
write us letters to indicate that 
they did not want to play on our 
field unless the turf was replaced." 

Hilderbrand said the re- 
placement layer of turf is from the 
stock which was obtained from 
the New Orleans Superdome 
more than two years ago. 

"Buying the artificial turf 
from New Orleans saved North- 
western thousands of dollars," 
Hilderbrand said. "We should get 
five to six years of good usage on 
this turf before it starts to wear 
out." 

Installing the turf is All Pro, 
an Oklahoma company which 
specializes in stadium refurbish- 
ment. With the completion date 
set for August 8, Hilderbrand said 
the turf renovation cost is $84,500. 
The project is being funded with 
state appropriations and is being 
split between the 1986-87 and the 
1987-88 fiscal years. 



KNWD 



- — CREATIVE FM 

Look for a new look in 
alternative rock this fall 

9 1.7 FM 



You can strike 
a blow against 
Lajycer with 
qJdemorial 
Gift favour 
local Unit 
ofthe 



AMERICAN 
CANCER 
* SOCIETY® 




BOBBY WAGGONER, R.PH. 




UNIVERSITY PHARMACY 
and Gift Shop 



Hour*: 8:0(1 «.m. (o 6:00 p.m.. .Monday - Saturday 



926 ColU X e A 
N-uKitorkc. LA 7H57 



Telephont 

318/352-9740 
After Hour. 352-7616 






A New Skin 

A land scraper peels off the old turf that was used inTurpin Stadium for over 
five years. The turf will be replaced with the astroturf originally used in the 

Superdome in New Orleans. 



Old Fashion 
HAMBURGERS 




announces the opening of our new location. 
We now have two locations to serve YOU 
better! Stop by and see us for the best 
hamburgers in town at 904 COLLEGE next to. 
Pafs Economy from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

CUSTOMER APPRECIATION SPECIALS 



LARGE HAMBURGER, 

LARGE FRIES & LARGE 

DRINK $050 

jL plus tax 



SMALL HAMBURGER, 
SMALL FRIES & SMALL 
DRINK $O00 

PLUS TAX 



Specials Good At Both Locations, Call-in Orders Welcome. 

(#1) 500 TEXAS ST. (#2) 904 COLLEGE AVE. 
1* 352-5735 352-2711 «i 



HOLY GROSS 
CATHOLIC 
CHURCH 

CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER 

MASSES 
Saturday 4:30 pm 
Sunday 10:30 & 6:00 
Weekdays at 5:00 pm 



ALL STUDENTS 
AND 

FACULTY WELCOME 



1 29 SECOND STREET if 
352-2615 1 ' : 

PRAYER MEETING; WEDNESDAY AT 7 P.M. 



Johnny's Restaurant 

Located in the El C amino across from NSU 

Open from 6 a.m. - 10 p.m., 7 days a week 

Complete menu and short orders, great burgers 
Lunches served daily except Saturday 
Breakfast served anytime 
Takeout orders welcome 

NSU students, faculty, and staff welcome! 
Phone 352-4426 

10% off anything on the menu with this ad! 



<s ; isi... 



THE WAREHOUSE 

Health and Racquet Club 

Natchitoches* Newest Tradition 

... A unique concept in fitness 

... Featuring Bodymaster weight machines, racquetball courts, 

sunbeds, individual or group low impact aerobics, treadmill, 

exercise bicycles 
... Babysitting services 
... Designed for personal satisfaction 
... For the young and the young-at-heart 
... Relaxed, fun environment where an individual, a couple, or 

groups from a local business can join and set individual goals 

to achieve optimal health 
... Prescriptive programming available 

Coed Open 7 days a week 

Great Location - Across from the university 



Why not invest in yourself? 
You 're worth it! 

357-0772 



William Ackel, Owner 
David Coker, Manager 
Warehouse Health and Racquet Ciub 
400 College Avenue 
Natchitoches, LA 714S7 



Rurnm-lhaH. Wpiehtt and Aprnhir^ 
Scudenu • $25 
Single - $30 
Couple ■ S\0 
Family - $60 

Rarannhall and VWifhu 
Suidenu - $20 
Single ■ $23 
Couple ■ $35 
Family - $43 

Afrnhjf f 
$20 

Si nhcrj 

10 Sessions - $30 



1, 1987 



PAGE 3 



CURRENT SAUCE 



JULY 21 , 1987 



)M ON OUR MINDS 



plan for $47; 
seven days fa 
al five days. 
I no longer b| 
d on Saturday 
c odd mimbci 
is because of 
>le on campft 
nds. There w8 
n evening mej 
he said. 
14 meal p : 
; the number <jj 
'our meal ticket) 
x; a person thai 
kfast, then y 
plan and it 
jh seven daysj 
vingthesudcnj| 
Fulton said 
and variable jj 
main the satftd 
Sonyo Rigaujj 

in Staff wm 

ONER, R.PH. 



MACY 



Whether you call them speed bumps or speed breakers, 
they still mean 

SLOW DOWN! 




t - S»tur<l»T 

Telephone 

18/352-9740 
r« 352-7616 



Well, it's happened again. 

That nasty Mr. Speed Bump 
has managed to find his way onto 
yet another unsuspecting college 
campus — Northwestern's. 

We all knew that it was 
going to happen. We had all been 
forewarned. Yet somehow those 
bumps caught us by surprise. The 
campus was all astir with the Folk 
Festival and whammy — out of 
nowhere, there they were. 

The speed bumps ha ve been 
the talk of the campus since their 
sneaky appearance and the talk 
has been interesting. My favorite 
is the humanitarian who was con- 
cerned for all the sports cars. 
"Those bumps are going to tear 
the oil pans off the bottoms of the 
sports cars," she whined. That is 



one caring student. 

Forgetting the precious 
cars, did you hear about that guy 
who was riding his bike in the 
dark and hit Mr. Speed Bump 
head on? (This was before they 



tion topics. After discussing it (Yet another conspiracy to slow us 
with students from as far away as down.) 

Georgia and Colorado it seems The bumps are working and 

that the common name for the have slowed down a few cars. I 
obstructions is "speed bumps." managed to walk brazenly across 
Back home we have a more digini- traffic-ridden Sam Sibley Drive to 
had painted the bumps yellow.) "I ne d name for them— speed break- the post office yesterday morning, 
hit that bump and my bike threw ers. I've adjusted to calling them I did have sense enough, however, 

speed bumps but it still reminds to keep the bump between me and 
me of a discomfort like goose the car (defensive walking), 
bumps or the chicken pox. Some people, however, 

Mr. Speed Bump didn't disregard the signs and the bumps 



me 20 feet. It was just like a buck- 
ing bull," he said. That cowboy got 
a free ride to the hospital and a 
month's supply of Band- Aids. 

And how about the lady 
who was driving along at the 
neck-break speed of 15 mph? 
When she hi t the bu mp she bi t her 
lip. I'd hate to think what she 
might have bit had she been going 
any faster. 

The bumps have spurred 
some other interesting conversa- 



come unescorted to our beautiful 
campus. He brought along some 
friends — those crude hand-let- 
tered warning signs. You'd think a 
guy like Mr. Speed Bump would 
hang around a more respectable 
crowd .Most drivers can't possibly 
read the signs unless they slow 
way down and scrutinize them. 



altogether. These folks roar over 
the bumps with no regard for their 
"poor sports car," its alignment or 
its precious oil pan. Really. 

But seriously, the bumps 
have a good purpose. If you've 
noticed, traffic has slowed consid- 
erably since they've taken root. 
The bumps may be an inconven- 





M7 Untv«ftu Prtst Syftd»c*l* 



ience, may cost you many dollars 
in car repairs and may even inflict 
injuries, but like many things on 
God's green earth they serve a 



Editor loses mind in Louisiana heat 




v location, 
erve YOU 
the best 
GE next to. 
p.m. 



IALS 

URGER, 
k SMALL 

200 
PLUS TAX 



come. 



GE AVE. 



ourts, 



My first, and hopefully last, 
summer session I have ever had 
the painful pleasure to attend is 
finally rolling to an end. With 
these final days upon me, I have a 
little time — between massive 
homework sessions and caffeine 
pills — to sit back and evaluate just 
what I really learned during this 
time. 

Sure, there were the usual 
scholastic achievements, which I 
hope will be evident in my final 
report card, but there were other 
more vital experiences I can claim 
as lessons learned the hard way. 
Perhaps a few of my unfavorable 
incidents will serve as warning 
posts for future suckers who plan 
to attend a NSU summer session, 
or maybe, because it is the last 
issue of the summer, I feel justified 
in revealing my latest bitches, 
gripes and groans. 

Perhaps one of the most 
important aspects I have learned, 
is that like many students my 
brain is on a seasonal clock, pri- 
marily because I am not used to 
attending summer school. 
Throughout my college years, at 
the very last day of instruction, at 
the very last minute of class, as the 



last final is handed back to the 
teacher, my train of thought is 
automatically shut down. My 
neurons are placed into mothballs, 
my left hemisphere is recalled for 
an overhaul, and the entire cranial 
structure shifts into auxiliary 
power, which consists of two or 
three synapses relaying simple 
motor functions such as shovel 
that concrete, catch those rays and 
drink that beer. 

You can imagine the shell 
shock I endured when I realized I 
had to use my head for processes 
other than supporting my sun- 
glasses this summer. I felt as if this 
semester has moved in slow mo- 
tion. I have no one else to blame 
for this mental sluggishness but 
myself. Perhaps in the future I will 
take up some literary functions to 
keep my brain from bogging 
down. I will read the ingredients 
on each and every beer bottle be- 
fore I take a slug. 

Another important summer 
session lesson: if you are from 
Colorado, avoid living in Louisi- 
ana in the summertime. Let me 
rephrase that: if you are from the 
f irey depths of hell, avoid living in 
Louisiana in the summertime. I 



have never been witness to so 
much heat and humidity in all of 
my life and I still have August to 
contend with. I thought I had the 
perfect solution to beat this burn- 
ing menace: the greatest accom- 
plishment in mankind, the oasis of 
technology, the Bossier Hall cen- 
tral air conditioning unit. 

I opened my air condition- 
ing vent to full blast, collapsed on 
my bed, dreamt of high mountain 
glaciers and rapid flowing 
streams and awoke with a cold. I 
would never conceive of putting 
up with the coughing, sneezing 
and overall painful symptoms of a 
winter cold in 90 degree summer 
heat. 

There is but one solution for 
dealing with the Natchitoches 
summer: go somewhere else! 

Another problem of sum- 
mer school is the peer pressure. 
Not from the fellow students at- 
tending the institution, but from 
all of theout-of -college and gradu- 
ated hell raisers who have nothing 
better to do bu t drag a poor, "help- 
less" student out on the town to 
get smashed when he should be 
doing his homework. All I can say 
is that thank God the former editor 



of this paper got a job midway 
through the semester. I thought I 
was going to have to check myself 
into the Betty Ford Clinic. 

Well, we can't dwell in the 
past — what is done is done. Some 
day I will look back at the pain 
filled days of my first summer 

session and laugh some day. 

The end is almost near, and soon I 
will be able to sit back, shut my 
brain off, and enjoy the mentally 
docile simplicities of summer. But 
the battered veterens of summer 



session should not rest too much 
at case. Cheer up gang, in less than 
three weeks after the last day of 
summer session, it starts up all 
over again. 

GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 



The staff of the Current Sauce wishes 
the best of luck for Dr. and Mrs. 
Brodermann in their retirement and hope 
that they find happiness in their new 
Miami home. 

The Brodermanns are to be 
commended for their years of dedication to 
the instruction of Northwestern and 
Louisiana School students. 

Hasta luego 



HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? 

WRITE A LETTER TO THE EDITOR 



idmm - THIS WEEK'S QUESTION: 



Did you enjoy this summer's session better than 
last summer's? Why? 



)le, or 
al goals 



Iprnhire 







1STERW 





Paula Burke 
GR, Education 
Cottonport, LA 

"hast summer session was 
better because I had more free time 
to enjoy the sun and fun, and there 
was a longer break between the 
summer und fall semesters." 



A 



Jack B, Bedell 
GR, English 
Houma, LA 

"1 would say thai last sum- 
mer was more productive for rue. 
Being able to concentrate on my 
studies five days a week — even 
though for only six weeks — 
proved much more effective than 
this summer." 



Sheila Deloatia 
SR, Social Work 
Natchitoches 

"I enjoyed last summer bei* 
tcr because it was shorter and by 
the time I was bored with sum mer 
school it was over. The short ses- 
sion wasmoreproductwebecause 
you had no time to- goof off." 



Richard Whitaker 

SR, Physical Education 
Cushing, Texas 

"This summer was defi- 
nitely better than last summer. 
The three-day weekends gave the 
students a chance to have a break . 
after the long boring week." 



Mia^Sepulvado 
SR, English Ed. 
Ebarb, LA 

"! enjoyed this summer bet- 
ter because classes are easier and 
the three day weekends are nice. " 



purpose. 



LISA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 



CURRENT SAUCE 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 

LISA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 

STEVE HORTON 

News Editor 

NAN GOSS 
SONYA RIGAUD 

Staff Writers 

ALLEN EVANS 

Advertising Manager 

EDD LEE 

Circulation/Distribution 

CHARLOTTE RUSH 

Photo Editor 

TOM WHITEHEAD 

Adviser 



The Current Sauce is 
published every two weeks 
during the summer 
semester by the students of 
Northwestern State Univer- 
sity of Louisiana. It is not 
associated with any of the 
university's departments 
and is financed indepen- 
dently. 

Current Sauce is 
based in the Office of Stu- 
dent Publications located 
in Kyser Hall. The office of 
the editorial staff is 225A. 
telephone (318) 357-5456. 
The adviser's office is 103 
Kyser Hall, telephone 357- 
5213. 

The mailing address 
for the Current Sauce is P.O. 
Box 5306, NSU, 
Natchitoches, LA 71497. 

All correspondence, 
including letters to the edi- 
tor is welcome. Material 
submitted for consideration 
must be mailed to the 
above address or brought 
to the office. 

The deadline for all 
advertising and copy is the 
Friday before Tuesday pub- 
lication by 9 a.m. Inclusion 
of any and all material is left 
to the discretion of the edi- 
tor. 

Letters to the editor 

should be typed (double- 
spaced) and signed, and 
should include a telephone 
number where the writer 
can be reached No 
anonymous letters will be 
printed. 

Current Sauce sub- 
scription rates are $11 per 
academic year (26 issues) or 
$6 per semester ( 1 2 issues). 
The paper is entered as 
second-class mail at 
Natchitoches, LA. The USPS 
number is 140-660.' 




PAGE 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



JULY 21, 1987 



AROUND CAMPUS 



Blood drive 

The Natchitoches Area Jay- 
cecs are sponsoring a blood drive 
in Prathcr Coliseum on Wednes- 
day, July 22, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.. 

Greg Burke, chairman of the 
Jaycces blood drive, said, 'The 
Jayceesare encouraging Natchito- 
ches area residents to support this 
worthwhile project. Whether or 
not one person gives blood may 
seem insignificant but when you 
consider that the Louisiana Blood 
Center requires some 6,500 units 
of blood each month to serve the 
area hospitals, it really is impor- 
tant to make sure that enough 
blood is available when it is 
needed." 

Burke said donors will re- 
ceive a blood drive beverage 
cooler (hugger), complete with a 
12-ounce plastic cup, compli- 
ments of Natchitoches Coca-Cola. 

Special examinations 

Dr. Gordon Cokcr, Head of 
the Department of Health, Physi- 
cal Education, and Recreation, 
said that special examinations in 
health and physical education will 
be administered 9 a.m. Monday, 
September 28, in the Health and 
Physical Education Building, 
room 108. The exams are optional 
exams in which students can test 
out of physical education courses. 
Coker said the exams were pri- 
marily for Health 202 classes. 

Papers submitted 

Seven graduate students 
from North western's Department 
of Psychology have submitted 
papers for presentation this fall at 
the annual conventions of the 
Louisiana Psychological Associa- 
tion (LPA) and the Louisiana 
School Psychological Association 
(LSPA). 

Dr. Don Gates, professor 
and chairman of the Department 
of Psychology, said papers sub- 
mitted by the graduate students in 
psychology will undergo review 
by the respective convention pro- 
gram committees to determine 
eligibility for presentation. 

The Louisiana School Psy- 
chological Association's conven- 
tion is scheduled for Oct. 29, in 
Lafayette, and the annual meeting 
of the Louisiana Psychological 
Association will be held Nov. 5-7 
in New Orleans. 

Graduate students submit- 
ting papers for presentation at the 
LSPA convention are: Belinda 
Walker, of Port Arthur, Texas, and 
Robert Davis of Lake Charles. 

Preparing studies for the 
LPA convention are: Carol 
Richardson of Bossier City; Timo- 
thy Wolfe of Wheeling, W. Va.; 
Suzi Claire of Houston, Texas; 
Eileen Kilbride of Montreal, Que- 
bec, Canada, and Robert 
Yuspchjr. of New Orleans. 

Faculty members sponsor- 
ing papers submitted by the stu- 



dents are Dr. Robert Breck- 
enridge, professor of psychology, 
for the LPA convention and Dr. 
Gail Chcramie, assistant professor 
of psychology, for the fall meeting 
of the LSPA. 

Promotion 

NSU has announced the 
promotion of Amanda Mclean 
Young from librarian to the posi- 
tions of assistant professor of li- 
brary science and head of the 
media and serials division of 
Watson Memorial Library. 

Young, who has been on the 
Northwestern staff since 1973, 
received her bachelor's of arts 
degree from NSU in 1984 and a 
master's of library science degree 
from Louisiana State University in 
1986. 

Young currently holds pro- 
fessional affiliations with the 
American Library Association, 
the Louisiana Library Association 
and the LSU School of Library and 
Information Science Alumni As- 
sociation. 

Young is also active in such 
organizations as: Delta Sigma 
Theta Sorority, Order of the East- 
em Star — Prince Hall Affiliation, 
American Legion Auxiliary and 
the NSU Alumni Association. 

Snowden elected 

Fraser Snowden, associate 
professor of philosophy at North- 
western, was recently elected to 
serve a second year term as Chair- 
man of the Board of the Louisiana 
Endowment for the Humanities 
(LEH). Elcted at the LEH Board 
meeting in New Orleans, Snow- 
den is completing his fourth year 
with the group. In addition, he 
was voted to serve another term of 
three years. 

A member of the NSU fac- 
ulty since 1970, Snowden teaches 
in the Department of History, 
Social Sciences, and Social Work 
and is currently Grants Director at 
the University. He has published 
numerous articles and reviews in 
the area of philosophy and the hu- 
manities, has co-edited a book on 
ethical issues of treatment of se- 
verely handicapped newborns, 
and is co-editor of a book, "Age 
and Wellbeing: A Bioethical Per- 
spective," which is to be published 
by the NSU Press in the fall. 

The LEH is the state affiliate 
of the National Endowment for 
the Humanities and is devoted to 
encouraging and funding public 
programs in the academic hu- 
manities throughout the state. In 
recent years the LEH has spon- 
sored a scries of library reading 
programs, summer institutes for 
high school teachers, traveling 
museum exhibits and confer- 
ences. 

"The work of the LEH is 
very exciting because we are tak- 
ing the academic humanities — 
history, literary criticism, philoso- 



phy, political science, cultural 
ethnic studies — directly to the 
people," Snowden said. 
"We have supported oral history 
projects, conferences on Southern 
literature and education, newspa- 
per columns on the Constitution 
of the United States, radio pro- 
grams on New Orleans jazz , and 
countless others designed to help 
us reflect on our cultural heritage 
and the values that inform our 
lives." 

The LEH Board consists of 
20 individuals from across Louisi- 
ana; five are governor appointees, 
the rest are drawn from the aca- 
demic and non-academic spheres. 

Business workshop 

A two-session workshop 
titled, "Starting and Running 
Your Own Business," will be con- 
ducted Tuesday, July 21, and 
Thursday, July 23, from 7 to 9:30 
p.m. in the Conference Room of 
the Central Louisiana Chamber of 
Commerce Building in Alexan- 
dria. 

The workshop is being pre- 
sented by the Small Business De- 
velopment Center (SBDC) at NSU, 
the Service Corps of Retired Ex- 
ecutives (SCORE) and the Central 
Louisiana Chamber of Commerce 
in cooperation with the Louisiana 
Department of Commerce and the 
U.S. Small Business Administra- 
tion. 

The workshop staff will 
feature Dr. Barry Smiley, NSU 
business professor and director of 
the Small Business Development 
Center; Mary Wilkerson, SBDC 
counselor at Northwestern, and 
Creighton Romine, Natchitoches 
area representative for SCORE. 

Topics for the Tuesday 
night workshop session will be: 
"Assessing Small Business Op- 
portunities," "Financial Plan- 
ning," and "Dealing With the 
Bank." The program on Thursday 
night will cover such topics as: 
"Managing Your Small Business," 
Marketing Strategy," and "SBA 
Assistance." 

Pre-registration fee for both 
sessions is $20. Registration at the 
door will be $25 per person. 

For additional registration 
information or further details 
about the two-session workshop, 
call the Small Business Develop- 
ment Center at Northwestern, 
(318) 357-5611, or the Central 
Louisiana Chamber of Commerce, 
(318)442-6671. 

Paper presentation 

Dr. James McCorkle Jr., 
professor of history at Northwest- 
ern, recently presented a paper at 
the Symposium on Publicly Spon- 
sored Agricultural Research in the 
United States, which was held in 
Fargo, N. D. 

McCorkle's study, titled 
"Truck Crops Experiment Sta- 
tions and Southern Truck Farm- 



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ing," was presented during the 
symposium's session pertaining 
to agricultural research in the 
South. 

The three-day agricultural 
history symposium at the Radis- 
son Hotel in Fargo was sponsored 
by the Agricultural History Soci- 
ety, the North Dakota Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station and the 
North Dakota Institute for Re- 
gional Studies. 

Participating in the sympo- 
sium as presenters were historians 
from more thanl5 collcces and 
universities in the United States 
and Canada as well as agricultural 
researchers representing private 
industry and governmental agen- 
cies. 

Relocation 

The office of the Division of 
Continuing Education and Com- 
munity Services has been relo- 
cated from Caspari Hall to Room 
143 of the Health, Physical Educa- 
tion and Recreation Building. 

The division, which offers a 
wide variety of continuing educa- 
tion courses and numerous lei- 
sure-time programs for adults and 
youth, is now under the direction 
of Dr. Sam Coker, professor and 
chairman of the Department of 
Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation. 

Joyce Brodcrick will con- 
tinue to serve as the office man- 
ager for the Division of Continu- 
ing Education and Community 
Services. 

Individuals interested in 
courses, workshops or non-credit 
programs, or who would like to be 
added to the mailing list to receive 
information on the division's of- 
ferings, should call (318) 357-5126 
or write: The Division of Continu- 
ing Education and Community 
Services, Northwestern State Uni- 
versity, Natchitoches La. 71497 

Academic skills course 

The office of Academic 
Support Services will replace the 
College Success 0900 course with a 
new course titled: Academic Skills 
1010. Academic Skills 1010 is of- 
fered for one credit hour to any 
student who feels a need to im- 
prove his or her study skills. Any 
entering freshman with a high 
school GPA of 2.0 or below is en- 
couraged to enroll. All students in 



developmental English, math and 
reading are also strongly urged to 
take the course 

Course topics include goal 
setting, time management, note 
taking for lectures and textbooks, 
improving concentration, and test 
taking skills. 

For more information, con- 
tact the Academic Support Serv- 
ices Office at 104 Kyser Hall. 



Academic interviews 

Special Services loenk'd in 
104 Kvscr Hall is now making 
appointments for academic inter- 
views. Northwestern students are 
invited to make an appointment 
with a counselor to discuss goals 
and objectives of the university 
career, majors and how to choose a 
major, fall semester plans, and to 
learn what is available through 
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SEPTEMBER 1 , 198; 



VOL 76 NO>; 5 



CURRENT S 



/ 




NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY OP LOUISIANA 



NATCRfrOCHES, LOUISIANA 71497 



Emergency status removed 

Northwestern back in black 



At the request of President 
Robert Alost, the Louisiana Board of 
Trustees for State Colleges and Uni- 
versities removed the financial emer- 
gency status that Northwestern has 
been under for the past year. 

Alost said Northwestern en- 
tered the 1986-87 fiscal year with a SI 
million deficit but through tuition 
increases and personnel reductions 
was able to end the year with a bal- 
anced budget. 

"We had to declare financial 
exigency so we could do some drastic 
things in reducing the faculty and 
staff, which was where a great portion 
of our money was spent," Alost said. 
"But I think it's detrimental to the 
university to remain in that state." 

"Last year we set aside a re- 



serve of about SI .6 million and we 
didn't touch that. A lot of it was taken 
by budget cuts. I told the department 
heads that even though their budget 
was not what I wished it to be, they 
could spend their budget," Alost said. 

Alost said Northwestern 
ended the 1986-87 fiscal year with a 
S600,000 surplus, which was recircu- 
lated into university departments. 
"Those were dollars we held back to 
see if we were going to make it. When 
1 told the department heads we had 
money left over at the end of the year, 
they just sat there and looked at me in 
disbelief," Alost said. "I'm sure they 
couldn't believe two things: first, that 
we had some money left over, and 
second, that I asked them how they 
wanted to spend it." 



Alost said he again plans to set 
aside a reserve due to the uncertainty 
of future finances for colleges in Lou- 
isiana. "This year we have set aside a 
reserve of about $1.2 million. Again 
we told the department heads, if you 
want to spend all your money by Janu- 
ary and hope that there is a surplus at 
the end of the year you are welcome to 
try. 1 am not going to take their budget 
away from them." 

"We dare not be in the posture 
of not having that reserve, because no 
one knows what is going to happen to 
the financial condition of Louisiana," 
Alost said. "1 think everything is on 
hold until after the gubernatorial race. 
Between now and January or Febru- 
ary, the money is going to be kind of 
tight. We will have to see what the 



legislature is going to do." 

Alost said he is content with the 
number of academic personnel he 
presently has and has no intention to 
fire or hire more. "We will not hire 
additional personnel. We have some 
funds set aside, so if the state will 
allow us to do it and they don't take 
our money away, by January or Febru- 
ary we may be able to implement 
some salary raises," Alost said. 
"We are in a better financial posture 
than what we have been in, but we are 
not out of the woods yet," Alost said. 

Greg Kendrick 

Editor 




Moving in 



In a community effort, Natchitoches Mayor Joe 
Sampite (above) and President Alost (right) help 
students move into Sabine Hall on Aug. 23. 
Prominent community members and NSU faculty, 
staff and administrators lent a hand to students 
returning to the campus. 




English, math proficiency tests 
slated for first-semester juniors 



First-semester juniors at 
Northwestern will be required to take 
both math and English proficiency 
tests this fall, as mandated by the 
Louisiana Board of Regents. 

Dr. Edward Graham, vice 
president of Northwestern, said, 'The 
Board of Regents wanted a profi- 
ciency test in basic writing skills and 
algebra to determine the success of the 
math and English departments." 

According to Graham, the 
freshmen students who enter North- 
western this fall will be required to 
take the proficiency tests in order to 
graduate. 

Graham said the reason the 
first-semester junior level was chosen 
as first classification to take the profi- 
ciency test is that most first-semester 
juniors have taken the English 
1010,1020 and math 1050,1060 

courses. 

'Typically this is a junior level 
exam. It is given late enough for all 
students to have already taken the 
courses, and it is given early enough to 
make corrective action if the student 
fails the proficiency test," Graham 
said. 

The writing proficiency test is 
slated for H a.m. Thursday, Sept. 10. 
Juniors are to report to Kyser Hall, 



room 142, shortly before 11 a.m. in 
order to receive their room assign- 
ments. Students should take blue 
books, pens, dictionaries, and their 
ID's to the test. 

Dr. Sara Burroughs, chairman 
of the Language Arts Department, 
said the English proficiency test 
should reflect the skills learned in 
English 1010 and 1020. 

'The student should show that 
he or she has the power to pick a 
manageable topic, organize thoughts, 
write a thesis, substantiate the thesis, 
and do so in coherent paragraphs," 
Burroughs said, adding, "We expect 
to see clear sentences, good vocabu- 
lary, clear conclusion, and an interest- 
ing paper." 

Burroughs said thebest level to 
issue the English proficiency test is the 
first-semester junior level. "It would 
appear as a low blow to the seniors if 
we were to add this in their final year," 
Burroughs said. "The sophomores 
would have just finished English 1010 
and 1020, we assume that they have 
these skills. What we are trying to 
ensure is that the students maintain 
these skills after they have had the 
composition class. The juniors seem 
the logical ones to test." 

Burroughs said the reason the 



proficiency test is scheduled so early is 
so that an eight-week self-paced pro- 
gram in writing can be offered. The 
program will allow students to pre- 
pare for the test if they do not pass it 
the first time. The program will be 
conducted on a voluntary basis and 
will be held in the English writing lab. 

Burroughs said the test should 
last no longer than an hour and a half 
due to limited time in reserving the 
classrooms. 

"People need more practice 
writing and we are afraid that in their 
sophomore year they are not getting it, 
therefore losing the skills they learned 
in 1010 and 1020," Burroughs said. 

Although the math proficiency 
test date has not yet been designated, 
Graham said the date will probably 
occur within a week after the English 
proficiency test. 

Dr. Austin Temple, Head of the 
Department of Math, said the math 
proficiency test will be algebra based. 
"If the students have had the mini- 
mum of Math 1050 (intermediate alge- 
bra) or 1060 (finite math), and they 
satisfactorily passed 1 050 or 1 060, they 
should pass the proficiency test," 
Temple said, adding, "There will be 
greater emphasis toward the material 
learned from 1050." 



Record rush 
reported 



More than 200 Northwestern stu- 
dents decided to join the Greek system 
during fall rush last week. 

Sorority rush sign-up began Sun- 
day, Aug. 23 for women interested in 
being Greek. Fraternity rush also be- 
gan on Sunday with the Interfrater- 
nity Council (IFC) selling rush cards to 
men wanting to participate. 

Rush parties began Monday, Aug. 
24 with the IFC Mixer in Union Station 
and with each sorority hosting an 
open house. Highlights of fraternity 
rush included the invitational and bid 
parties held by each group. Sorority 
favorites included Phi Mu's 
Hoedown, Sigma Kappa's Toy 
Shoppe and Tri-Sigma's Roaring 20's 
parties. Following a week of get-to- 
gethers, fraternity and sorority 
rushees picked up their bids Friday, 
Aug. 28. 

According to Andy Harris, IFC 
president, a major change imple- 
mented by IFC this year was having a 
dry rush. IFC, the governing board for 
the Greek social fraternities, ruled that 
no member of a fraternity could serve 
or drink alcohol with a rushce from 
Sunday, Aug. 23 until Friday, Aug. 28 
at 7 p.m. Darryl Andrews, Kappa 
Sigma, said, "I like dry rush better 
because you get to know guys without 
any sort of false front which alcohol 
might cause." 

Geovanny Canizares, a Theta Chi 
pledge, said, "Dry rush was a way to 
get good pledges. You get to meet 
them in their sober stage." 

David Wolfe, IFC vice president, 
said each fraternity rushee was re- 
quired to visit each fraternity house on 
Tuesday and Wednesday nights. Sid 
Williams, Sigma Tau Gamma, said, 
"Requiring each rushee to visit every 
house was helpful to both the actives 
and the rushees. Everyone was given a 
fair chance." 

According to Wolfe, this fall's fra- 



ternity rush was the best on this cam- 
pus in years. "It's looking great all 
over campus. We've all gotten along 
well and we have been complimented 
on ourorganization and punctuality." 

Wolfe added, "NSU Greek alumni 
are really pleased with what is hap- 
pening with the Greek system at the 
new NSU." 

Marjorie Poss, Panhcllenic ad- 
viser, said sorority rush was very suc- 
cessful this year with more than 195 
girls signing up for rush and more 
than 100 girls pledging. Panhellenic is 
the governing board for the Greek 
social sororities at Northwestern. 

Cindy Ross, Tri-Sigma, said, "I 
was really satisfied with rush this 
year. Panhellenic and all the sororities 
did a terrific job in putting on a rush 
with so many rushees." 

"The amount of rushees going 
through was incredible and frighten- 
ing at first, but it all worked out great," 
Melody Smith, Phi Mu, said. 

In addition to changes made by 
IFC, Panhellenic also made changes. A 
Panhellenic workshop was held Sat- 
urday, Aug. 29 for sorority actives and 
the new pledges. A Panhellenic 
pledging at Chaplin's Lake was held 
at 8 p.m. Saturday. All sorority mem- 
bers, new and old, were required to 
attend both the workshop and the 
pledging. 

Rachel Heidcr, Sigma Kappa, 
said, "Marjorie Poss did an excellent 
job of showing the new pledges of all 
sororities what it means to be a Greek 
woman at NSU and that all of us can 
accomplish great things together." 

"I think we've had a fantastic 
rush. We had more people interested 
and more pledge than ever before. I'm 
looking forward to a great year," Poss 
said. 

Sonya Rigaud 

Staff Writer 



Special cable channels 
offered in dormitories 



Temple said the test will be 
administered twice during the fall 
semester: once in September and once 
during the last week of school before 
finals start. 

Temple said the math depart- 
ment had previously administered 
the test to some Math 1050 and 1060 
classes during the spring 1987 
semester and then studied the grade 
distribution of these tests to determine 
the minimal passing score for the 
proficiency test. 'The score is roughly 
equivalent to the score a student 
would make in Math 1050 or 1060 of a 
grade of "C" or better," Temple said. 

"This is not the type of exam 
where a student can spend a lot of time 
preparing for it. You either know it or 
you don't," Temple said, adding, "We 
will be happy to provide to the student 
a description of the test." 

"I think it is important that the 
student have minimum skills in 
mathematics and English. If a student 
can't perform basic mathematical 
operations or is not able to communi- 
cate, he or she really has no business 
getting a college degree," Temple 
said. 

Greg Kendrick 

Editor 



Students living on campus this 
year have yet another option to add to 
their list of improvements in dorm 
life — expanded cable TV. 

Although Natchitoches Cable 
TV has offered the 12-channel basic 
cable service to Northwestern resi- 
dents for the past two years, students 
who find that offering not enough can 
now expand their viewing world. 

Natchitoches Cable TV is offer- 
ing five specialty channels such as 
HBO and Cinemax, and an addi- 
tionall6-channel package, manager 
Sam Holland said. 

"We have placed more chan- 
nels for television viewing on the NSU 
campus than any other university 
campus in Louisiana, including the 
LSU Baton Rouge campus," Holland 
said. 

Speciality channel offerings 
include HBO for S9 a month; Cinemax 
for S8; Showtime for S8; Movie Chan- 
nel for $9; and the Disney Channel for 
S7.75 monthly. 

The 1 6-cha n nel package will be 
available for S5.25 a month. Including 
channclsl4 through 29, the package 
offers such channels as Video Hits 1, 
Nashville Network, Financial News 
Network, Arts & Entertainment, Dis- 
covery, Home Shopping Network and 



C-Span. Northwestern residents cur- 
rently receive channels 2-13 free of 
charge in the dorms. 

The expanded services are 
available as options via a computer- 
ized convertor control box connected 
to each television set and controlled by 
a central computer. 'The convertor 
box allows the cable system to tailor 
different options and levels of service 
to each viewer's preference," Holland 
said. 

In order to receive the conver- 
tor box, students must pay a S50 de- 
posit which is refunded when the box 
is returned. A S15 activation fee is also 
charged. However, students who 
purchase one of the speciality chan- 
nels will pay an activation fee of only 
S7.50. Students purchasing two or 
more of the specialty channels will 
pay no activation fee. 

Although Natchitoches Cable 
TV will be visiting thedormitorics and 
allowing students to sign up for the 
expanded services, students wishing 
to obtain the services earlier may do so 
by going by the cable office located on 

321 Texas Street. 

Lisa Darden 

Managing Editor 



Staff writer offers 
entertainment guide 
for NSU newcomers 

see page seven 



— .. - • ... - ! 



PAGE 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 1 , 1987 



SEP- 



NEWS 



PF 



Trustees approve academic enhancement fee 



{Shreveport Times Aug. 29) 
Some Louisiana universities could 
charge students up to S25 next 
semester as an academic enhance- 
ment fee, the Board of Trustees for 
State Colleges and Universities de- 
cided Friday. 

North Louisiana colleges in- 
cluded in the Trustees system are 
Northeast Louisiana, Louisiana Tech, 
Grambling State, and Northwestern 
State University. 

The Board voted 11-3 to give 
the colleges the option of charging the 
enhancement fee. If a college decides 
to charge the fee, the money would be 



tacked on to the tuition, Larry Crain, 
president of the Trustees system said. 

According to the article in the 
August 29 issue of the Shreveport 
Times , President Robert Alost said he 
does not plan to raise the fee. 

'It's just pretty tough eco- 
nomic times right now, and we don't 
feel like in our area we could do that. 
We just don't feel like it's in our best 
interest right now," Alost said. 

Officials at Northeast and Lou- 
isiana Tech said they are undecided 
about the fee increase. Tech President 
Dan Reneau said he will not ask the 



students to pay the enhancement fee 
in the fall quarter but is considering 
the fee for next year. Reneau said an 
additional S25 fee would bring in 
$300,000 a year. 

Presently, the University of 
Southwestern Louisiana is charging 
students a SI academic enhancement 
fee. 

SGA president Johnny Cox, a 
student representative on the Louisi- 
ana Board of Trustees, voted against 
the proposed fee raise saying officials 
should not discuss the fee increase 
without first consulting the students. 
However Cox's remarks came after 



the final vote had been taken. 

"I just wanted them to consider 
the students' consensus," Cox said. "I 
wasn't against it, I just wanted the 
students to have a voice in it. It could 
be a positive thing." 

Cox, who is also president of 
Northwestern' s Student Government 
Association, wanted to know where 
and why the money would be spent. 

Area board members voting 
for the fee were: Enoch Nix, Bossier; 
Calvin Wilkerson, Grambling; James 
Davidson, Ruston; and Ray Wright, 
Monroe. 



SAB welcome week considered a success 



The fall semester began with a 
week of fun designated as Welcome 
Week. 

Sponsored by the Student Ac- 
tivities Board (SAB), Welcome Week 
included a wide variety of entertain- 
ment such as popular movies, dances, 
and ice cream socials. 

"W e wanted to plan something 
for every night and encourage stu- 
dents to join in the student life at 
Northwestern," said Kenneth 
Holmes, SAB program adviser. 

Welcome Week also offered 
special services such as information 



booths to aid students in registration 
and help in moving into the dorms. 

Other campus organizations 
joined the SAB in welcoming students 
by hosting special night events. These 
groups included the Baptist Student 
Union, Panhellenic, Student Govern- 
ment Association and the InterFrater- 
nity Council. 

"We had a really good re- 
sponse during Welcome Week and we 
hope students will continue to attend 
events," Holmes said. 

Holmes said the most success- 
ful event of Welcome Week was the 



dance in the Ballroom on Monday. 
Featuring DJ Brent Brown, students 
filled the Ballroom to dance. 

The Student Activities Board 
has also planned numerous events for 
the semester. The events include 
weekly ongoing movies in the Addi- 
tion and Union Station, both located 
on the first floor of the Student Union. 

This week's movie is Peggy 
Sue Got Married . Weekly movies are 
shown at 9 a.m., 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. 
Monday through Friday in the Addi- 
tion and at 7 p.m. each Wednesday in 
the Union Station. Next week's movie 



is Man From Snowy River . 

Other upcoming events in- 
clude comedian/magician Charles 
Green set for 7 p.m. Sept. 11 and 
musician Craig Carges set for 7 p.m. 
Sept. 18. Both acts will appear in 
Union Station. 

Students wishing to become 
involved on the SAB should stop by 
room 214 in the Student Union or call 
357-6511. 



Christi Rhymes 

Staff Writer 



SGA goals stated 
for 1987 term 



"It is really too early to say, 
Tley this is what we are going to be 
doing and this is what we are not 
going to be doing.' It is just too early at 
this time," said Johnny Cox, president 
of the Student Government Associa- 
tion (SGA). 

However, the SGA is currently 
working on changing some of the new 
policies in the Student Handbook. 

'There have been a few changes 
made and many complaints heard, 
especially complaints about the new 
visitation rules," Cox said. Most of the 
complaints, he said, refer to the open 
door policy. "Within two to three 
weeks we should be addressing the 
open door rule." 

Cox believes the SGA has 
strengthened since last year. "The 
SGA is stronger now than in the past." 
This strength, he said, is due in part to 
three new officers. 

In reference to vice president 
Dave DeCuir, Cox said, " He has really 
been a positive force behind the SGA 
this summer." Cox also praised 
Melissa Harper, secretary, and Shwu 
Fen Lee, treasurer, for their contribu- 
tions. 

In preparation for the new aca- 
demic year, the SGA created a new 
theme— The All New SGA. One of the 
new aspects include the revisions to 
the constitution. The revised 



Ho 



constitution includes new byla^ 
concerning State Fair and Home-corn 
ing activities and changes concernim 
the trust fund and monies allocate, 

P erstudent - cringinEngl 
In addition to these revisioiju^ ^ j un 

Cox said some new rules concemtyjj mz;ersi jy f < 

elections have also been added. In pa^f/and, U nde 

elections, controversies have surfao^f Exchan 

and Cox believes the new rules v^ now d en p reS£ 

eliminate some of the problems. Studyi 

The "All New SGA" will ^forayea 

working closely with the Studejy as both a i 

Activities Board in planning evei^perjencg 

for the students. Cox said, "Our >nt^, roU gh ou t £ 

est is the same as before, to benefit tL^d j nK t j mi 

students here at NSU." plover the 



Cox believes the SG A's leade 



ivorite Briti; 



Downs, Forward to highlight 
distinguished lecture series 



Once again Northwestern will 
present the Distinguished Lecture 
Scries for both Northwestern students 
and the public. 

Hugh Downs, host of ABC's 
20/20 , and Dr. Susan Forward, co- 
author of the book Men Who Hate 
Women and The Women Who Love 
Them, are slated to speak this fall. 
Stanford Biologist Paul Ehrlich is 
scheduled to present a lecture during 
the spring. 

The lectures will be given in the 
A. A. Fredricks Creative and Perform- 
ing Arts Center at 11. a.m. Classes 
scheduled at this time will becanceled 
for the lectures. 

Downs, who is scheduled to 
speak Tuesday, September 29, is best 
known as the host of 20/20, a weekly 
primetime news magazine series. 
Downs, who will be speaking on the 
Age of Information, started his career 
in broadcasting at the age of 19 as a 
radio announcer in Ohio. 

After serving in the U.S. Army, 
Downs began working at NBC as an 
announcer. Downs has also worked 



with the Tonight Show , 
Concentration, a daytime game show, 
and was host for nine years on the 
Today show. 

Forward is slated for an Oct. 29 
appearance. Forward, a psychologist, 
is widely known for her recent book 
Men Who Hate Women and The 
Women Who Love Them which she 
co-authored with Joan Torres. The 
book focuses on the phsycological 
abuse found in some marriages. 

Forward developed the first 
private sexual abuse clinic in Califor- 
nia and has served as a group thera- 
pist, consultant and expert witness. 
Her first book, Betrayal of Innocence 
was about her work with incest vic- 
tims. Forward is currently working on 
a book about destructive parents. 

Arrangements have been made 
for Ehrlich to speak February 9, 1988. 
Students will be admitted free to the 
lectures with their student IDs. 

Michele Broomfield 

Staff Writer 




Downs 




Forward 



IS THIS ANY TIME TO THINK 
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degree worth more. 

ROTC offers scholarship and 
financial opportunities, too. 

Plus, the opportunity to graduate 
w ith a commission and 
begin your future as an 
officer 

For more informa- 
tion, contact your 
Professor of Military 
Science. 

ARMY ROTC. 
BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 



ship and political influence will hjjjust to se ^ 
very strong on campus. 'The SGA weat h e 
be working with teachers, studei^ cents a ne 
and student media to make this a siu-j hoinesicl 
cessful year," he said. 'The studen|j ctors ma ^ e 
are going to have a very strong voi^ nothing 
through the SGA." .fearningthatt 

More definite plans for th^ s 
group will be established followin| i ^ave 
the first few meetings, Cox said. Th| rarm wgicoj, 
first SGA meeting was held last nigljL^ j was 
For information on SGA, c^ onald Reag . 
the SGA hotline at 357-4501. .^te) j^ec 

■ — -tes no histoi 

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SEPTEMBER 1, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 3 



PROFILE 



Hostile attitudes encountered 



byH ISEP student relates overseas 



md Homeconj 
ges concerni^ 

Dnies allocate j uliet S nowden is a senior mo- 
oring in English who recently com- 
hcse revisioMfcta/ j unior year abroad at ^ 
lies concernity mwrslty of Strathdyde in Glasgow, 
ti added. Inpa^f/,,^ un d er tne International Stu- 
shavesurfaogj^f Exchange Program (ISEP). 
new rules \^ n0V }den presently attends LSU. 
problems. Studying in Glasgow, Scot- 

' bbnd, for a year as an exchange student 

h the Stude^as 

both a wonderful and horrible 
lanning e veryj X p er j ence i enjoyed traveling 
aid, Our »ntM, r0 ughout Europe during vacations, 
e, to benefit t^e nc ji n g time with new friends from 
;ill over the world, and seeing my 
e SG A's leadi vorite British bands. But I had to 
luence will bUj ust to seve ral new things: cold 
.'TheSGAv^y weat h er , Scottish and English 
:hers, studen^e,,^ a new educational system, 
nakcthisasu^j homesickness. Although these 
'The studei^ ctors made it difficult in the begin- 
ry strong voifjj^ nothing bothered me more than 

,$arning that the British dislike Ameri- 
e plans for th^ s . 

shed followinj i have t0 admit r expected a 
, Cox said. Tljj |farm welcome upon my arrival. In- 
held last nighty i was harassed because of 



experience 



"Southerner". This made it worse 
because they then asked me if I owned 
slaves. 

After a few months 1 stopped 

(TAHincr nncnf anrl hpaan to analv7P 

why the British felt this way about us. 

I could accept that the U.S.A. is 
not well liked. I even agreed with 
some of the British criticism of Ameri- 
can politics and culture. But I was 
confused in finding American bars, 
restaurants, discos, and clothing all 
over Britain. It was ironic listening to a 
Scottish student bad-mouth the U.S. 
and then slip into a "New York City" 
jacket. It happened often. 

American looks and clothing 
were all over the Glaswegian streets. 
Popular among the teenagers was the 
50's look, and even a few punks were 
into poodle skirts. Another big fad 
was high school and college letter 
jackets, imported from America and 
then sold at Flip of Hollywood, a 
trendy secondhand shop. Converse 
hightops sold at inflated prices and 
n on SGA, c^ ona j,j Reagan (for whom I didn't younger teens wore T-shirts support- 
ote) and heckled because "America ing such teams as "The San Francisco 
las no history." If that wasn't bad 



Sarah BulUfoough, I was told I spoke like Daisy 
Staff WrIUn The Dukes ofHazxard . I shrugged 
ff rude remarks most of the time, but 
hey became a burden I had to deal 
•y ith on a daily basis, leading to de- 
gression and anger. My exchange 
Program handbook never mentioned 
Sits. I felt left out — left out of a whole 
aunfy. 

Before 1 go any further, I must 
ay that not all British dislike Ameri- 
cans. On a few occasions people were 
specially nice to me because of my 
nationality. One 10-year-old boy 
asked for my autograph and several of 
my professors were especially kind to 
ne because they knew 1 was far away 
rom home. Most of my friends were 
^ttish or English, but even they 
leckled me by imitating an exagger- 
ated Southern accent and by con- 
stantly reminding me of my national- 
ly. I was called "Yank" a couple of 
imes a day until I insisted I was a 



Dodgers" and 'The Arizona Bowling 
Club." I have yet to figure out if these 
were jokes or just misprints. Most of 
the kids who wore these clothes 
envied and belittled the U.S. Others 
wore them because they were trendy. 
I couldn't understand why all these 
American clothes were selling so well 
if our culture was so offensive. 

Chris, an English friend, 
helped me understand the negative 
attitudes toward us. He hated Amer- 
ica because he felt Britain was sacrific- 
ing its culture for America's. The in- 
flow of American bars, discos, and 
restaurants disturbed him. He felt 
threatened not by the establishments 
but by America itself. "The English 
pub is disappearing and American 
bars are replacing them. That scares 
me and makes me angry," he said. I 
understood how he felt, but I told him 
he should be blaming his own coun- 
trymen for allowing it to happen. The 
demand for letter jackets and Ameri- 



can bars certainly wasn't from Ameri- 
cans but from his own people. 

Along with the numerous busi- 
nesses, there were many American 
programs on British television, all of 
which misrepresent the U.S. Several 
people thought I drove a Cadillac and 
lived on a ranch because they had seen 
too many episodes of Dallas. Every- 
one else thought I was just rich. At 
pubs people often said to me, "Oh, 
you're American, you buy the 
drinks." But isn't the U.S. to blame for 
these misconceptions? After all, such 
programs as the The Colbys, Love 
Boat, L.A. Law, and Moonlighting 
present us falsely. Few American 
programs depict the lives of a lower 
class family or even a lower-middle 
class family; I can only think of two — 
Sanford and Son and Good Times. 
Unfortunately, these shows aren't 
aired in Britain. It is the rich executives 
and lawyers who are the dominant 
characters in our programs seen there. 

The British, on the other hand, 
have such shows as East Enders , a 
weekly series about the working class 
in the East End of London, and Tag- 
gart, a low budget detective show. 
Taggart is an original because its great 
plot outweighs the need for expensive 
special effects such as car crashes and 
exploding buildings. The few shows 
that are British are about the middle 
and working classes. With this con- 
trasted to our shows it's no wonderthe 
British have inaccurate ideas about 
Americans, ideas which lead to dis- 
content, jealousy, and even admira- 
tion. I say admiration because many 
British do admire the fact we seem to 
have everything we want. Often after 
telling someone I was American he or 
she would raise an eyebrow as though 
pleasantly surprised, only to instantly 
put on a mask of distaste. 

I feel Americans are open to all 
foreigners with the exception of 
Middle Easterners (for political rea- 
sons). If an American meets a French- 
man, an Australian, or an Irishman, he 
is usually interested in talking to that 



With our lack of knowledge 
concerning British politics, we are 
branded as "stupid" . This label seems 
appropriate, though, because the 
average American doesn't know who 
Margaret Thatcher is. In a random 
telephone survey, I asked 25 north 
Louisianians: "What role does Marga- 
ret Thatcher play in British politics?" 
Seven were correct in identifying her 
as Prime Minister, but 14 had never 
heard of her, two said she was the 
President, and another said she was 
the secretary. One said she tended to 
the wounded! 

When 72 percent of a random 
sample doesn't know the answer to 
such a question, we seem ignorant, 
but in reality we just aren't exposed to 
British news. Therefore we don't 
know as much about them as they 
know about us. 

Although I might be totally off, 
I've come up with a theory of why be 
angry with our unawareness of them. 
Fifty years ago, the British ruled one- 
third of the world . They were the most 
powerful nation for hundreds of 
years. In the 20's, 30's and 4Cs, be- 
cause of rebellion and financial diffi- 
culty, Britain rapidly lost entire coun- 
tries they once ruled. With the older 
generation, this imperialist pride still 
thrives. 

My elderly British history pro- 
fessor once said that it was still hard 
for him to deal with the fact that Brit- 
ain has fallen. To Britain's dislike, 
America has now taken a position of 
world leadership. One might argue 
that the U.S. isn't imperialist, at least in 
the same sense that Britain was, but 
the British resent us for our involve- 
ment in Vietnam, Korea, Africa, and 
South America. We interfere with 
these countries because of our per- 
sonal interest. In a sense, that is impe- 
rialistic. We are now the great nation, 
and we will be judged more harshly 
than any other because of our posi- 
tion. 

see ISEP 
page eight 



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Army ROTC is the college 
elective that gives you an 
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management skills. Experience 
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techniques. And gain the self- 
confidence that can spell success 
in any career, civilian or military. 

Start that career with the 
advantages only Army ROTC can 
give you. Talk to your Professor 
of Military Science, today. 




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SEPTEMBER 1, 1987 

^5, 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 5 



Changes can create excitement 



Welcome back to Northwest- 



ern. 



And for those of you who are 
new — welcome. 

During the summer some ex- 
citing events occurred at Northwest- 
ern. Much has happened and much 
has changed. For those of you who are 
brand new here, take our word on the 
metamorphosis of Northwestern. 

Students who attended school 
this summer were the first to view and 
to catch wind of the upcoming 
changes. We viewed the installation of 
the speed bumps and flashing lights. 
We attended the Scholars' College 
induction. We were here for the resig- 
nation, firing and promotion of vari- 
ous staff and faculty. 

While the rest of you were in- 
volved in the summer's worldy hot 
topics ranging from contraceptives to 
Contra-deceptives, we here at North- 
western were wrapped up in a world 
of our own. 

Although we summer students 
experienced the upcoming changes 
firsthand, we also suffered some in- 
conveniences. We lived in dorms with 



no visitation, no phones, no TV and no 
cable in the individual rooms. These 
minor annoyances were inconven- 
ient, yes, but when we saw the im- 
provements that were made to our 
"regular school-year home" we forgot 
the summer. 

It's nice to live in dormitories 
where the atmosphere is brighter 
(new and improved lighting), safer 
(new fire alarm systems), homier 
(microwave ovens and non- 
Naugahyde furniture), and cleaner (at 
least for the time being). 

Oh, I know we're still suffering 
some inconveniences — telephones 
still not connected, no mirrors in the 
bathrooms, and the overcrowded 
conditions. However, can't you admit 
its just a little bit better? 

However, some people will 
gripe about anything. Northwestern 
has been working very hard on im- 
proving its image and attracting more 
students to its campus. It looks as if 
we've achieved this goal and yet some 
students are angry because they have 
to walk 100 yards to their dorm in- 
stead of being able to park right up 



front. Now that's what I call a major 
inconvenience. 

Despite the minor inconven- 
iences and gripes, a change is in the air. 
It is exciting to be at Northwestern. 
The number of students walking 
around has increased and the parking 
lot didn't empty out this past week- 
end. Could it be that people actually 
wanted to spend the weekend on 
campus and in Natchitoches? Imagine 
that. 

As students at Northwestern it 
is our responsibility to keep this new 
exciting spirit alive and well. It's up to 
us to make Northwestern shine. If we 
want something we can be proud of, 
we're going to have to take a part in 
making it that way. 

If we want to keep our campus 
beautiful and our dorms clean, we're 
going to have to help. How hard is it to 
walk three feet and throw that Big Mac 
box into the trash can? How hard is it 
to keep that beer can or Coke container 
in our cars until we get to a trash can? 
Are we not yet old enough to realize 



that when we toss that bag of Burger 
Kingpapcrsout the windowthat it has 
to land somewhere? 

Sure the campus looks gor- 
geous by day, but have you been out 
before the grounds crew makes their 
rounds at 7 a .m . to tidy up? It's hardly 
a pretty sight. The beautiful campus is 
usually adorned with fast food pa- 
pers, beer cans, busted bottles and soft 
drink containers. The parking lots and 
the area around Chaplin's Lake usu- 
ally seem to be the hardest hit. 

It's time that we as students 
take an active part in promoting pride 
in Northwestern. Although your ef- 
fort may seem small, every action you 
take has an impact on the campus and 
other students. 

We're off to a good start this 
semester. Let's keep up the good work 
and lend a helping hand ourselves. It 
sure feels good to feel good about 
Northwestern! 



Lisa Darden 

Managing Editor 




Letters 



Dear Editor: 

Camille Hawthorne, yes 
Camille, is gone from these hallowed 
halls of Northwestern. Camille, who 
served in the Department of Student 
Activities for the past eight years, has 
filled such positions as assistant to the 
director of Student Life, assistant di- 
rector of Student Activities, and direc- 
tor of Student Activities. Her main job 
was director of the Student Activities 
Board. 

Camille came to NSU as a stu- 
dent in the mid-70's. While a student 
she was active in many organizations, 
especially the SAB. 

In the last year of her under- 
graduate tenure in the SAB, she was 
voted Outstanding Board Member by 
her peers on the board. 

At that time the SAB and Stu- 
dent Activities were under the direc- 
tion of Robert Wilson. Camille deeply 
respected Mr. Wilson, and Student 
Affairs, and subsequently enrolled in 
the Student Personnel Services gradu- 
ate program, thus working with NSU 
activities for another two years. Upon 
obtaining her graduate degree, she 
was offered the job to work as Mr. 
Wilson's assistant. Being from 
Natchitoches and loving NSU, she 
took the job and started her career in 
Student Personnel Services. 

Camille, since that time, has 
seen many students come and go 
through NSU and the SAB. In 1985 
Mr. Wilson passed away and Camille 
was hired in his place. Every student 
that has served on the SAB, under her 
direction, was welcomed by Camille. 
The SAB is a lot of hard work and 
thorough planning. No matter how 
hard and difficult the task, Camille 



helped with a youthful spirit, upbeat 
personality, and admirable profes- 
sionalism. Though most of the work 
load of the SAB is handled by the 
board members and committees, 
Camille would take care of the little 
things that were overlooked, and 
gladly lend an ear when someone had 
a problem. 

Working with Camille was 
fun! All students -graduate and 
undergraduate- who have worked 
with her have enjoyed many laughs 
and much success in bringing activi- 
ties and entertainment to Northwest- 
ern. Her personality and guidance 
will be missed not only by the past and 
present board, but by future genera- 
tions of students at Northwestern. 

Thanks Camille. 

—The SAB 

'87-'88 



Dear Editor, 

Welcome back! I trust we all 
had a great summer and are looking 
forward to a great year here at the new 
Northwestern. Ahhhhhh, we have it 
made in the good ol' U.S.A. Some 
people are not so fortunate. 

While we are starting a new 
year, meeting new friends, and living 
new experiences there exists an evil 
assault on human dignity in South 
Africa. Apartheid policies prevent 
more than 22 of its 26 million citizens 
from the right to vote, live where they 
would like, and obtain an adequate 
education. The oppressed peoples of 
South Africa are denied the opportu- 
nity to own property and thousands of 



Upperclassmen, it's our turn 



"Something is 

different extremely different." That 

was the initial observation that 
rambled through my mind the day I 
moved back into the dormitories for 
the fall semester. At first, I could not 
achieve the big picture of this campus 
transformation, but as I walked 
through the daily endeavors of stu- 
dent life at Northwestern, the big pic- 
ture came into focus: this campus is 
alive. 

I am sure that most of the fresh- 
man of this campus are blind to this 
observation, but it should be quite 
apparent to veteren students that 
changes have been made in many 
aspects of student life. 

Upper classmen please look 
around you. You can cite improve- 
ment everywhere: the dormitories 
have been refurbished to above stan- 
dard living conditions; the aesthetic 
landscaping throughout the campus 
has contributed to its already natural 
beauty; and the food service has im- 
proved almost overnight and will 
continue to improve as ARA Food 
Service continues to expand their 
service to the students. 



Forget the materialistic im- 
provements of the campus for a 
moment. Let's focus on the more 
important aspect of this change: the 
student body. I can feel the electricity 
throughout the campus; it is full of 
bright, intelligent students ready to 
get involved with the extracurricular 
functions of the campus. I feel that 
apathy has been thrown out the win- 
dow. The sorority pledge quota 
jumped from 27 to 41, in one year's 
time; the fraternities extended more 
than 100 bids. My evidence strikes 
closer to home. I am willing to bet that 
my Current Sauce staff has more than 
doubled. I am anxious to utilize my 
new supply of students to make this a 
more student oriented paper. 

Need more simplistic evi- 
dence? How many upperclassmen 
remained on campus last weekend 
and observed a full parking lot in front 
of the Sabine and Rapides dormito- 
ries? Perhaps it is time for this college 
to shed the reputation as a "suitcase 
college". 

Who is responsible for this 
positive upswing of student enthusia- 
sim and accountability? I feel it is at- 
tributed to some unique and bold 
administrarivepolic^^ 



gated by Dr. Alost and his staff. The 
Admissions office has been runnning 
in overdrive recruiting some of the 
best and brightest high school stu- 
dents available in the state. This is 
reflected in the drastic increase in 
enrollment and the three point climb 
in the student ACT average, mind 
you, in one year's time. 

So where does the upperclass- 
man stand amongst this scholastic 
improvement? I feel we must take on a 
role of responsibility. The administra- 
tion of this campus recruited this 
needed supply of new blood, the 
upper classmen should be held ac- 
countable for the retention of it. We 
must not allow these new students to 
loose interest in the university. 
Apathy has haunted this university in 
the past. We should not hand this 
worthless trait on to the next group of 
individuals. I guess what I am asking 

the upperclassmen to do is to show 
some responsibility and accountabil- 
ity toward this institution. Your ac- 
tions are being observed by younger 

eyes. 

Greg Kendrlck 

Editor 



its citizens have been jailed without 
trial or other means of redress. 

Imagine living in a society 
where you could be jailed at anytime 
for being in the wrong place or saying 
the wrong thing. Imagine living in a 
society where you could be jailed for 
trying to find out where a family 
member disappeared to, after they 
happened to be in the wrong place or 
said the wrong thing. Imagine living 
in a society wherel5 percent minority 



made all the laws and ran all the busi- 
ness and wouldn't give you the right 
to vote so that you could have a say in 
your lifestyle. 

We are lucky indeed to be liv- 
ing in America. We are lucky to be able 
to vote, pursue an education, own 
property, and have the right to a fair 
trial when we are accused of a crime. 
I'm not sure what possessed me to 
write this letter. I guess we should just 
feel lucky when the first round of tests 



come along. In other places around the 
world people are dying as they fight to 
get the opportunity to pursue an edu- 
cation. 

Chris Wilcox 
Senior 

Business/Finance 

see letter 
page seven 



CURRENT QUOTES 





As a newcomer to Northwestern, what is your opinion of the university? 







a4 



Aileen Ellis 
FR, Nursing 
Columbia 



Angela Williams 
FR, Psychology 
Scholars' College 



Denise Amett 
FR, Music Ed. 
Scholars' College 



Irene Enriquez 
FR, Pre-Dentistry 
Zachary 



"I like NSU. The campus is really 



"Northwestern has really im- 



"NSU is closer knit than most "I like the friendly atmosphere at 

college campuses I've visited and everyone NSU. The teachers and advisers give me 

is really nice and friendly." the impression that they really care about pretty and relaxing. The classes are very pressed me with all the enthusiasm pre- 

helping me through this program. That challenging, but I know that they will be sented during the first week. Also the 

kind of concern is hard to find at any quite rewarding if 1 stick to my guns and campus grounds are very pretty. The 

university." do my best." people here are very helpful and nice." 



Jerry Cobb 

FR, Jour., PR 
Natchitoches 



"It's cool." 



HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? 

WRITE A LETTER TO THE EDITOR 



CURRENT SAUCE 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 



USA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 



KIRK COPELAND 

Sports Editor 



SONYA RIGAUD 
CHRISTI RHYMES 
DAN MEDLIN 
SARAH BULLER 
MICHELE 8ROOMFIELD 
Staff Writers 



ALLEN EVANS 

Advertising Manager 



EDD LEE 

CIrculatlon/Dlstrtoutlon 



CHARLOTTE RUSH 

Photo Edlltor 



WILUAM FRANCO 
TEDRIS SMITH 

Photographers 



TOM WHITEHEAD 

Adviser 



The Current Sauce is 
published weekly during the fall 
and spring semesters by the stu- 
dents of Northwestern State Uni- 
versity of Louisiana. It Is not asso- 
ciated with any of the 
University's departments and is 
financed Independently. 

The Current Sauce Is 
based in the Office of Student 
Publications located in Kyser 
Hal. The office of the editorial 
staff Is 22SH. telephone (318) 
357-5466. The adviser's office is 
103 Kyser Hall, telephone 357- 
5213. 

The mailing address for 
the Current Sauce Is P.O. Box 
5306, NSU, Natchitoches. LA 
71497. 

All correspondence. In- 
cluding letters to the editor Is 
welcome Material submitted 
for consideration must be 
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brought to the office. 

The deadline for all ad- 
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p.m. Inclusion of any and all 
material is left to the discretion of 
the editor. 

Letters to the editor 
should be typed (double- 
spaced) signed, and should In- 
clude a telephone number 
where the writer can be 
reached. No anonymous letters 
will be printed. 

Current sauce subscrip- 
tion rates are $ 1 1 per academic 
year (27 issues) or $6 per 
semester (14 Issues). The paper Is 
entered as second-class mail at 
Natchitoches. LA. The USPS 
number is 140-660 



PAGE 6 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 1, 1987 



SPORTS 




Tough season opener 



Practice makes perfect 
A Demon football player cuts loose from the crowd during 
Saturday's scrimmage at Turpin stadium. 



The Northwestern Demons 
will have their hands full this week- 
end with Arkansas State, opponent 
wishbone quarterback Dwane Brown, 
and history. 

It's not enough that the De- 
mons have to travel to Jonesboro, 
Ark., where the Indians haven't lost in 
20 straight home games and are 48-19- 
1 in Indian Stadium. The Demons also 
have to contend with Brown, a 5-foot- 
9, 180 pound senior who last year led 
the Tribe in rushing and passing on 
the way to becoming Offensive Player 
of the Year in the Southland Confer- 
ence. 

But history is also working 
against the Demons. 

This is the 69th opening game 
for Northwestern, and in those 69 
contests the Demons have posted a 29- 
35-4 record. However, they are win- 
less in four attempts during head 
coach Sam Goodwin's reign as Top 
Demon. The last time NSU was victo- 
rious in an opening match was in 1973 
when they blanked East Texas State 
24-0. 

ASU, on the other hand, is 39- 
28-5 in initial skirmishes and have not 
lost at home on opening day since 



Larry Lacewell took over as Chief 
Indian. 

This is the fourth time the two 
teams have met to begin the season, 
ASU winning the first three, twice by 
shutout. Last year the Indians 
drubbed the Demons 21-0 in the 
opener. 

Series-wise, the Indians lead 5- 
2after being shellacked 41-6 in the first 
contest way back in 1948. 

Coach Goodwin was realistic 
about his team's chances this Satur- 
day. 

"They're not unbeatable up 
there," remarked Goodwin, "they're 
just tough to beat anywhere." 

Goodwin went on to say that 
Northwestern would be ready for this 
week's game. 

"We've moved the ball but 
made some really simple-minded 
mistakes. This year we're going to 
keep (the game plan) simple," Good- 
win said of the past two ASU games. 

The teams square off at 7 p.m. 
Saturday night at Indian Stadium in 
Jonesboro. 

Kirk Copeland 

Sports Editor 



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Team strengths listed 



Yes, football fans, believe it or 
not, the 1987 season is upon us and it is 
time to turn our minds from power- 
hitting outfielders and third basemen 
to power-hitting linebackers and full- 
backs. 

For the Northwestern State 
Demons, however, minds are turning 
not necessarily to power, but to speed: 
speed in the form of All-American 
tailback John Stephens. 

Stephens, who led the team by 
rushing 988 yards last year, needs only 
637 yards to surpass the late Joe De- 
laney as the all-time Demon rusher. 
His 4.4 speed in the 40-yard dash has 
left many opposing defenders grasp- 
ing at air. 

However, don't think this 6- 
foot-l-inch, 215 pound senior can't 
bowl you over with power. 

Demon Head Coach Sam 
Goodwin, who has had many great 
runners under his tutelage, compares 
Stephens to Gary Anderson who car- 
ries the ball for the San Diego Chargers 
and to Jessie Clark, a bruising back 
now suiting up with Green Bay's 
Packers. Both Anderson and Clark 
were pupils of Goodwin when he was 
an assistant at the University of Ar- 
kansas. 

"John is a combination of the 
two," Goodwin said. "His speed is not 
quite as good as Gary's, but he's al- 
most as strong as Jessie and he can 



catch the football like both of them. I 
would say he's a better athlete than the 
two of them, though." 

However, Stephens won't be 
able to do it alone. 

Quarterback Rusty Slack will 
lead the offense with his arm and his 
legs. Last year Slack rolled up impres- 
sive statistics: 349 yards, 44 percent 
completions and 664 yards passing. 
Slack will have to continue the good 
work in order for the Demons to be 
successful. Wide receivers Floyd 
Turner and Al Edwards will be on the 
receiving end of most of Slack's 
passes. 

Defensively, end John 
Kulakowski will be a major factor in 
the Men in Purple's progress towards 
the playoffs in 1987. Coming off an all- 
conference year in 1986, the big guy 
will be counted on more than ever 
before to anchor the defense. 

The Demons are hoping to 
improve on the 1986 record of 5-5-1 
that was, at best, mediocre. But Coach 
Goodwin is optimistic. 

"If we get great play from our 
offensive line and our defense," he 
predicted, "I feel we'll be in the hunt 
for the conference championship." 

Kirk Copeland 

Sports Editor 



Northwestern ranked low 



If North Texas State fails to win 
the 1987 Southland Conference foot- 
ball championship, then the league's 
coaches, sports information directors 
and various members of the media 
may all be classified as having rocks 
for brains. 

Those three groups all chose 
the Mean Green Eagles, with a 6-4 
record a year ago, as the team to beat 
when the season kicks off this Satur- 
day. 

NTSU received four first place 
votes from the seven head coaches, 



five from conference SIDs and 13 out 
of a possible 19 from the print and 
electronic media. 

The news wasn't as good for 
Northwestern State's Demons, slated 
for a last place finish by the SLC 
coaches, sixth place by the SID's, and 
fifth by the media. 

"I don't feel that we're going to 
be that bad," said NSU head coach 
Sam Goodwin. "If we receive great 
play from our offensive line and from 
our defense, then I feel that we'll be 
inthe hunt for the conference 

championship title." 



The results of the polls are: 

Head Coaches 



1. North Texas 

2. Sam Houston 

3. Northeast La. 

4. SW Texas 

5. Stephen F. Austin 

6. McNeese St. 

7. Northwestern St. 



SID's 

North Texas 
Sam Houston 
Northeast La. 
McNeese St. 
SW Texas 
Northwestern 
S.F. Austin 



Media 



North Texas 
Northeast La. 
Sam Houston 
SW Texas 
Northwestern 
McNeese St. 
Stephen F. Austin 




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37 



SEPTEMBER 1, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 7 



Tips on surviving a school year 



Natchitoches entertainment guide 




MO* 



To be redundant, I'd like to be 
.j\e thousandth person to welcome 
; ou to Northwestern and to Natchito- 
,;hes. 1 hope your classes are going 
yell and you are finding your way 
(round campus despite the confusing 
lumbering system for buildings, 
(low that you're settled in, maybe I 
jan give you some advice on things to 
jo off campus in your spare time. 

Although Natchitoches may 
jeem to be dead to you, I could not 
Irentureto say that you would be right, 
jn fact, this town is actually geared, in 
■ old fashioned way, toward the 
jieeds of its largest industrial prod- 
bets — Northwestern students. 

The most frequented restau- 
[ants are the fast food places on "The 
ftrip" or officially Highway 1. The 
Strip is the section that runs from 
geyser Avenue to Wal-Mart. If you 
(laven't made your way there yet, it is 
definite must see. 

Burger places along The Strip 
include Burger King, Wendy's and 
UcDonald's, each being visited 
tqually by throngs of students. Ken- 
ucky Fried Chicken is an old tradition 
ind its counterpart is Church's Fried 
thicken at the opposite end of The 
Strip. Sonic is another old tradition 
md is great for those occasions when 
pou can't wait to hear that new tape 
pu bought but had better get a bite to 
at before you faint. 

Taco Bell and the Donut Fac- 
ory are two of the newest additions to 
ITie Stripandareabreakof the "tradi- 
ional" offerings. Pizza places seem to 
iominate The Strip although not out 
numbering the burger places. They 
ire, strangely enough, located very 
close to each other. Pizza Inn, Pizza 
Hut, Domino's and Mr. Gatti's, all 
within 100 feet of each other, compete 
teavily for pizza lovers' business. All 
have either buffets or some special 
offering at different times. Mr. Gatti's 



does have that awe inspiring big- 
screen TV which qualifies it for a sure 
first-date visit. 

After filling up on such delica- 
cies I might suggest a casual stroll 
through Wal-Mart to pick out all those 
things you really don't need and some 
of those you do. If you do like to "just 
cruise The Strip," which I am sure you 
will tire of, a stop at either the Daiquiri 
Station located at Shamrock's restau- 
rant or a stop at Maggio's Liquor Store 
is an exciting drive-through experi- 
ence. 

Since it was just mentioned, 
Shamrock heads my list of more 
elegant dining experiences (good for a 
date). Shamrock has a casual atmos- 
phere, excellent food and good drinks, 
all at reasonable prices. Shamrock's 
bar is usually a fun meeting place for 
Northwestern students and because 
of its size is oftentimes crammed with 
partying bodies. 

At the other end of The Strip is 
South China Restaurant serving large 
portions of tantalizing oriental food. 
South China runs a daily lunch buffet 
at a budget-minded price and in the 
evenings opens the bar next door into 
Club Yesterday's, a newly renovated 
and, as of late, a more popular early- 
night-hours club. 

Mariner's Seafood & Steak 
House, located on Sibley Lake along 
the Higway 1 Bypass, is probably the 
most elegant of the nicer restaurants in 
Natchitoches, but mind you it is 
priced in accordance with this aspect. 
Delectable seafood at sometimes over- 
whelming prices makes this pick a 
good one for parent's weekend. 

Lasyone Meat Pie Kitchen in 
downtown Natchitoches is another 
impressive dining visit. Lasyone's 
serves Cajun and north Louisiana 
favorites including the orignal 
Natchitoches meat pie. 

To fill some of those spare 




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WORK FOR YOURSELF 



As a campus representative 
you'll be responsible for placing 
advertising materials on bulletin 
boards and working on 
marketing programs for clients 
such as American Express, 
Boston University, Eurall, and 
various movie companies, 
among others. Part-time work, 
choose your own hours. No 
sales. Many of our reps stay 
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daytime hours, many students flock to 
the local health clubs for a good work- 
out, some aerobics or racquetball. 
Down at the end of Keyser Avenue is 
Body World, the older of the two 
available clubs. Closer to campus on 
Second Street is the Warehouse, offer- 
ing special student rates and a sand 
wich shop in the back. 

If you're an outdoor person, 
Cane River Lake is great for skiing 
Also a short drive or ride can take you 
to Kisatchie National Forest for a 
beautiful all-nature hike. 

Evening and daytime walks 
through historic downtown Natchito- 
ches are always calming and roman- 
tic, especially as December ap- 
proaches and Natchitoches becomes 
the City of Lights. This is also an im- 
pressive time for parents to visit and 
when they do, make sure they stay at 
one of the historical bed and breakfast 
inns. They will be impressed with 
your maturing tastes in culture. 

For the spiritually inclined, the 
Baptist Student Union and the Wesley 
Foundation are located close to cam 
pus along College Avenue. Both offer 
many programs, parties, spiritual fel- 
lowship and are rewarding to visit. 

"Meet me at the Student Body" 
is a popular phrase for Northwestern 
students. Located on the Highway 1 
Bypass next to Antoon's Liquor, the 
Student Body is the most popular 
party place for students. Although the 
doors open at 9:30 p.m. and there is no 
cover charge until 10:30 p.m., the 
crowd doesn't start rolling into the 
Body until about 11 p.m. Bodacious 
Country is a popular country bar lo- 
cated on the Highway 1 Bypass al- 
though it usually draws an older 
crowd. Located down the road from 
Bodacious Country is Toby G's, an old 
bar under new management and fea- 
turing live music nightly. 

A nice club in Natchitoches is 

see Guide 
page eight 




A hard way to make a living 



A Demon running back is rudely greeted by the defense during the Saturday scrimmage 
prior to the season opener. 



Dear Editor: 

My name is Michael McHale. 
During the spring semester of last year 
I was elected as a Senator-at -Large to 
the Student Government at North- 
western. Unfortunately, the week be- 
fore the election, my schedule was 
rather hectic and I did not have time to 
submit a statement or photograph to 
the Current Sauce . Luckily, I was 
elected anyway. 

I would like to take this oppor- 
tunity not only to thank the people 
who voted for me, but also to make a 
brief statement about why I wanted to 
be Senator-at-Large and why I am 
grateful that I was elected. 

I have been at Northwestern 
for the past two years and I have seen 
very dramatic changes both in the 
University and in myself. Not all are 
for the better but for the most part all 



were improvements. I am trying to say 
Northwestern has become a part of 
me, and just as I have high hopes for a 
bright future for myself, I have the 
same visions for Northwestern. I see 
Northwestern growing and improv- 
ing everyd ay,andlwanttobeapartof 
that positive change, but as I help 
Northwestern prepare for a brighter 
tomorrow, I want to make sure that 
they do not forget the students of 
today. 

I would like to thank you for 
this opportunity to express my opin- 
ions, and invite all students to share 
their opinions with me, as I want to 
serve the students of Northwestern in 
every way I can. 

Sincerely, 

Michael McHale 

SGA Scnator-at-Large 



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PAGE 6 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 1 , 1987 



SPORTS 




Tough season opener 



Practice makes perfect 

A Demon football player cuts loose from the crowd during 
Saturday's scrimmage at Turpin stadium. 



The Northwestern Demons 
will have their hands full this week- 
end with Arkansas State, opponent 
wishbone quarterback D wane Brown, 
and history. 

It's not enough that the De- 
mons have to travel to Jonesboro, 
Ark., where the Indians haven't lost in 
20 straight home games and are 48-19- 
1 in Indian Stadium. The Demons also 
have to contend with Brown, a 5-foot- 
9, 180 pound senior who last year led 
the Tribe in rushing and passing on 
the way to becoming Offensive Player 
of the Year in the Southland Confer- 
ence. 

But history is also working 
against the Demons. 

This is the 69th opening game 
for Northwestern, and in those 69 
contests the Demons have posted a 29- 
35-4 record. However, they are win- 
less in four attempts during head 
coach Sam Goodwin's reign as Top 
Demon. The last time NSU was victo- 
rious in an opening match was in 1973 
when they blanked East Texas State 
24-0. 

ASU, on the other hand, is 39- 
28-5 in initial skirmishes and have not 
lost at home on opening day since 



Larry Lacewell took over as Chief 
Indian. 

This is the fourth time the two 
teams have met to begin the season, 
ASU winning the first three, twice by 
shutout. Last year the Indians 
drubbed the Demons 21-0 in the 
opener. 

Series-wise, the Indians lead 5- 
2 after being shellacked 41 -6 in the first 
contest way back in 1948. 

Coach Goodwin was realistic 
about his team's chances this Satur- 
day. 

"They're not unbeatable up 
there," remarked Goodwin, "the/re 
just tough to beat anywhere." 

Goodwin went on to say that 
Northwestern would be ready for this 
week's game. 

"We've moved the ball but 
made some really simple-minded 
mistakes. This year we're going to 
keep (the game plan) simple," Good- 
win said of the past two ASU games. 

The teams square off at 7 p.m. 
Saturday night at Indian Stadium in 
Jonesboro. 

Kirk Copeland 

Sports Editor 



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Lunches served daily except Saturday 
Breakfast served anytime 
Takeout orders welcome 

NSU students, faculty, and staff welcome! 
Phone 352-4426 

10% off anything on the menu with this ad! 



Team strengths listed 



Yes, football fans, believe it or 
not, the 1987 season is upon us and it is 
time to turn our minds from power- 
hitting outfielders and third basemen 
to power-hitting linebackers and full- 
backs. 

For the Northwestern State 
Demons, however, minds are turning 
not necessarily to power, but to speed: 
speed in the form of All-American 
tailback John Stephens. 

Stephens, who led the team by 
rushing 988 yards last year, needs only 
637 yards to surpass the late Joe De- 
laney as the all-time Demon rusher. 
His 4.4 speed in the 40-yard dash has 
left many opposing defenders grasp- 
ing at air. 

However, don't think this 6- 
foot-l-inch, 215 pound senior can't 
bowl you over with power. 

Demon Head Coach Sam 
Goodwin, who has had many great 
runners under his tutelage, compares 
Stephens to Gary Anderson who car- 
ries the ball for the San Diego Chargers 
and to Jessie Clark, a bruising back 
now suiting up with Green Bay's 
Packers. Both Anderson and Clark 
were pupils of Goodwin when he was 
an assistant at the University of Ar- 
kansas. 

"John is a combination of the 
two," Goodwin said. "Hisspeed is not 
quite as good as Gary's, but he's al- 
most as strong as Jessie and he can 



catch the football like both of them. I 
would say he's a betterathlete than the 
two of them, though." 

However, Stephens won't be 
able to do it alone. 

Quarterback Rusty Slack will 
lead the offense with his arm and his 
legs. Last year Slack rolled up impres- 
sive statistics: 349 yards, 44 percent 
completions and 664 yards passing. 
Slack will have to continue the good 
work in order for the Demons to be 
successful. Wide receivers Floyd 
Turner and Al Edwards will be on the 
receiving end of most of Slack's 
passes. 

Defensively, end John 
Kulakowski will be a major factor in 
the Men in Purple's progress towards 
the playoffs in 1987. Coming off an all- 
conference year in 1986, the big guy 
will be counted on more than ever 
before to anchor the defense. 

The Demons are hoping to 
improve on the 1986 record of 5-5-1 
that was, at best, mediocre. But Coach 
Goodwin is optimistic. 

"If we get great play from our 
offensive line and our defense," he 
predicted, "I feel we'll be in the hunt 
for the conference championship." 

Kirk Copeland 

Sports Editor 



NATCHITOCHES CABLE TV 



Northwestern ranked low 



If North Texas State fails to win 
the 1987 Southland Conference foot- 
ball championship, then the league's 
coaches, sports information directors 
and various members of the media 
may all be classified as having rocks 
for brains. 

Those three groups all chose 
the Mean Green Eagles, with a 6-4 
record a year ago, as the team to beat 
when the season kicks off this Satur- 
day. 

NTSU received four first place 
votes from the seven head coaches, 



five from conference SIDs and 13 out 
of a possible 19 from the print and 
electronic media. 

The news wasn't as good for 
Northwestern State's Demons, slated 
for a last place finish by the SLC 
coaches, sixth place by the SID's, and 
fifth by the media. 

"I don't feel that we're going to 
be that bad," said NSU head coach 
Sam Goodwin. "If we receive great 
play from our offensive line and from 
our defense, then I feel that we'll be 
inthe hunt for the conference 

championship title." 



The results of the polls are: 

Head Coaches 

1. North Texas 

2. Sam Houston 

3. Northeast La. 

4. SW Texas 

5. Stephen F. Austin 

6. MeNeeseSt. 

7. Northwestern St. 



SID's 

North Texas 
Sam Houston 
Northeast La. 
McNeese St. 
SW Texas 
Northwestern 
S.F. Austin 



Media 

North Texas 
Northeast La. 
Sam Houston 
SW Texas 
Northwestern 
McNeese St. 
Stephen F. Austin 




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SEPTEMBER 1, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 7 



Tips on surviving a school year 



Natchitoches entertainment guide 



To be redundant, I'd like to be 
,)ie thousandth person to welcome 
*u to Northwestern and to Natchito- 
kes. I hope your classes are going 
yell and you are finding your way 
jround campus despite the confusing 
lumbering system for buildings, 
low that you're settled in, maybe I 
jjn give you some advice on things to 
Jo off campus in your spare time. 

Although Natchitoches may 
jeem to be dead to you, I could not 
Venture to say that you would be right. 
I fact, this town is actually geared, in 
Is old fashioned way, toward the 
jeeds of its largest industrial pred- 
icts — Northwestern students. 

The most frequented restau- 
ants are the fast food places on "The 
ttrip" or officially Highway 1. The 
Strip is the section that runs from 
ICeyser Avenue to Wal-Mart. If you 
aven't made your way there yet, it is 
definite must see. 

Burger places along The Strip 
nclude Burger King, Wendy's and 
McDonald's, each being visited 
qually by throngs of students. Ken- 
cky Fried Chicken is art old tradition 
d its counterpart is Church's Fried 
hicken at the opposite end of The 
itrip. Sonic is another old tradition 
. md is great for those occasions when 
rou can't wait to hear that new tape 
rou bought but had better get a bite to 
at before you faint. 

Taco Bell and the Donut Fac- 
ory are two of the newest add itions to 
[he Strip and are a break of the "tradi- 
ional" offerings. Pizza places seem to 
lominate The Strip although not out 
lumbering the burger places. They 
ire, strangely enough, located very 
lose to each other. Pizza Inn, Pizza 
iut, Domino's and Mr. Gatti's, all 
within 100 feet of each other, compete 
leavily for pizza lovers' business. All 
lave either buffets or some special 
(ffering at different times. Mr. Gatti's 



does have that awe inspiring big- 
screen TV which qualifies it for a sure 
first-date visit. 

After filling up on such delica- 
cies I might suggest a casual stroll 
through Wal-Mart to pick out all those 
things you really don't need and some 
of those you do. If you do like to "just 
cruise The Strip," which I am sure you 
will tire of, a stop at either the Daiquiri 
Station located at Shamrock's restau- 
rant or a stop at Maggio's Liquor Store 
is an exciting drive-through experi- 
ence. 

Since it was just mentioned, 
Shamrock heads my list of more 
elegant dining experiences (good for a 
date). Shamrock has a casual atmos- 
phere, excellent food and good drinks, 
all at reasonable prices. Shamrock's 
bar is usually a fun meeting place for 
Northwestern students and because 
of its size is oftentimes crammed with 
partying bodies. 

At the other end of The Strip is 
South China Restaurant serving large 
portions of tantalizing oriental food. 
South China runs a daily lunch buffet 
at a budget-minded price and in the 
evenings opens the bar next door into 
Club Yesterday's, a newly renovated 
and, as of late, a more popular early- 
night-hours club. 

Mariner's Seafood & Steak 
House, located on Sibley Lake along 
the Higway 1 Bypass, is probably the 
most elegant of the nicer restaurants in 
Natchitoches, but mind you it is 
priced in accordance with this aspect. 
Delectable seafood at sometimesover- 
whelming prices makes this pick a 
good one for parent's weekend. 

Lasyone Meat Pie Kitchen in 
downtown Natchitoches is another 
impressive dining visit. Lasyone's 
serves Cajun and north Louisiana 
favorites including the orignal 
Natchitoches meat pie. 

To fill some of those spare 



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daytime hours, many students flock to 
the local health clubs for a good work- 
out, some aerobics or racquetball 
Down at the end of Keyser Avenue is 
Body World, the older of the two 
available clubs. Closer to campus on 
Second Street is the Warehouse, offer- 
ing special student rates and a sand- 
wich shop in the back. 

If you're an outdoor person, 
Cane River Lake is great for skiing 
Also a short drive or ride can take you 
to Kisatchie National Forest for a 
beautiful all-nature hike. 

Evening and daytime walks 
through historic downtown Natchito- 
ches are always calming and roman 
tic, especially as December ap- 
proaches and Natchitoches becomes 
the City of Lights. This is also an im- 
pressive time for parents to visit and 
when they do, make sure they stay at 
one of the historical bed and breakfast 
inns. They will be impressed with 
your maturing tastes in culture. 

For the spiritually inclined, the 
Baptist Student Union and the Wesley 
Foundation are located close to cam- 
pus along College Avenue. Both offer 
many programs, parties, spiritual fel- 
lowship and are rewarding to visit. 

"Meet me at the Student Body" 
is a popular phrase for Northwestern 
students. Located on the Highway 1 
Bypass next to Antoon's Liquor, the 
Student Body is the most popular 
party place for students. Although the 
doors open at 9:30 p.m. and there is no 
cover charge until 10:30 p.m., the 
crowd doesn't start rolling into the 
Body until about 11 p.m. Bodacious 
Country is a popular country bar lo- 
cated on the Highway 1 Bypass al- 
though it usually draws an older 
crowd. Located down the road from 
Bodacious Country is Toby G's, an old 
bar under new management and fea- 
turing live music nightly. 

A nice club in Natchitoches is 

see Guide 
page eight 




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BOBBY WAGGONER, R.PH. 



A hard way to make a living 



A Demon running back is rudely greeted by the defense during the Saturday scrimmage 
prior to the season opener. 



Dear Editor: 

My name is Michael McHale. 
During the spring semester of last year 
I was elected as a Senator-at-Large to 
the Student Government at North- 
western. Unfortunately, the week be- 
fore the election, my schedule was 
rather hectic and I did not have time to 
submit a statement or photograph to 
the Current Sauce . Luckily, I was 
elected anyway. 

I would like to take this oppor- 
tunity not only to thank the people 
who voted for me, but also to make a 
brief statement about why I wanted to 
be Senator-at-Large and why I am 
grateful that I was elected. 

I have been at Northwestern 
for the past two years and 1 have seen 
very dramatic changes both in the 
University and in myself. Not all are 
for the better but for the most part all 



were improvements. I am trying to say 
Northwestern has become a part of 
me, and just as I have high hopes for a 
bright future for myself, I have the 
same visions for Northwestern. I see 
Northwestern growing and improv- 
ing everyday, and I want to be a part of 
that positive change, but as I help 
Northwestern prepare for a brighter 
tomorrow, I want to make sure that 
they do not forget the students of 
today. 

I would like to thank you for 
this opportunity to express my opin- 
ions, and invite all students to share 
their opinions with me, as I want to 
serve the students of Northwestern in 
every way I can. 

Sincerely, 

Michael McHale 

SGA Senator-at-Large 



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PAGE 8 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 1, 1987 



CAMPUS LINE 



English proficiency test 

All first-semester juniors — 
those between 60 and 74 hours — must 
take a writing proficiency test at 11 
a.m. Thursday, Sept. 1 0, according to a 
mandate from the Board of Regents. 

This term is the first semester 
that the test will be administered at 
Northwestern. Students not passing 
the exam will be able to take a self- 
paced program through the Writing 
Center, Kyser 339. 

"We want to make sure that 
students retain the writing skills they 
leam in English 1010 andl020," said 
Sara Burroughs, chairman of the Lan- 
guage Arts Department. Memebers of 
that department will read the papers, 
she said. 

Juniors should report to Kyser 
Hall 1 42 shortly before 11 a.m. Sept. 10 
to be assigned a room. Students 
should take blue books, pens, diction- 
aries, and ID'S with them to the testing 
site. 

SGA filings, nominations open 

filings are now open for sev- 
eral Student Government Association 
senatorial positions and nominations 
for Homecoming Court, State Fair 
Court, and Mr. and Miss NSU are now 
being accepted, according to Jerome 
Cox, commissioner of elections. Open 
spots include two senator positions 
for each undergraduate class, two 
graduate senators, and three senators- 
at-large. Although senator-at-large 
positions are open to any qualified, 
full-time student, class senators must 
represent his/her respective class. 

Students interested in senate 
positions may pick up filing forms in 
either room 222 or 309 of the Student 
Union. Nomination forms for the 
courts will be available through stu- 
dent organizations and residence 
halls. Filings for senate positions will 
remain open until 4 p.m. Tuesday, 
Sept. 8. 

Elections for senate positions 
and the Homecoming Court will be 
held from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sept. 16 in 
the Student Union lobby. If necessary, 
run-offs will be held Sept. 23. 

State Fair Court and Mr. and 
Miss NSU elections will be held, Oct. 5 
in Shreveport and Oct. 7 on the 
Natchitoches campus. 

Those seeking Senate positions 
must post an election deposit of $10. 
The deposit will be returned if all 
signs, banners and other campaign 
materials are removed from campus 
within 48 hours of the election. 

Pictures of all qualified candi- 
dates will appear in the Current Sauce 
prior to elections. Candidate pictures 
will be taken from 4 to 6 p.m. Wednes- 
day, Sept. 9 in the NSU Photo Lab, 
located on the first floor of Kyser Hall. 

Each candidate has the option 
of submitting a 100- word typed state- 
ment explaining why he/she wishes 
to be a part of SGA. Statements not 
exceeding 100 words will appear in 
the Current Sauce. 

A meeting informing all candi- 
dates of rules and regulations will be 
held 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 10 in the 
SGA Conference Room, located on the 
second floor of the Student Union. 

Developmental education 

A special orientation program 
for all students enrolled in develop- 
mental education classes will be held 
11 a.m. Sept. 15 in the Kyser Hall 
auditorium. All students enrolled in 
at least one developmental education 
course (reading 0910, 0920, English 
0910, 0920, or math 0910, 0920) must 
attend. 

Ficklin elected 

Crawford Ficklin Jr., chief of 
Northwestern University Police De- 
partment, has been elected president 
of the Louisiana University Police 
Association. 

Ficklin, who has been a mem- 
ber of the NSU police force since 1971, 
was elected to the position during the 
annual LUPA convention held during 
July. 

Ficklin, who was voted Police 
Officer of the Year at NSU in 1981, is a 
graduate of the Louisiana State Uni- 
versity Law Enforcement Basic Train- 
ing Academy and has completed 
numerous law enforcement pro- 
grams, including the Louisiana Uni- 
versity Police Officers' Association's 
training seminar for supervisors and 
the radio telephone operators dis- 
patcher school at LSU. 

Legal assistant courses 

Three evening courses are 
being offered this fall in the non-de- 
gree, entry-level legal assistant train- 
ing program which is administered by 
the Department of History, Social Sci- 
ences and Social Work at Northwest- 
ern. Each of the courses will meet once 
a week from 6 to 9 p.m. in Kyser Hall 
and will fulfill requirements of the 
two-year, eight -course program. 

Courses being offered on the 
Natchitoches campus include: "Real 
Estate and Mortgages" on Tuesdays, 
"Introduction to Law" on Wednes- 
days and "Litigation" on Thursdays. 

Northwestern students who 
are not participating in the legal assis- 



tant training program may choose to 
enroll in any of the courses to satisfy 
elective requirements for degree pro- 
grams. 

In addition to the Natchitoches 
campus, Northwestern's entry-level 
program to train individuals for em- 
ployment in the paralegal field is also 
conducted at England Air Force Base 
and at Fort Polk. 

For applications, registration 
forms or information, call Dr. Maxine 
Taylor, program director, at 357-6195, 
or write: Legal Assistant Training 
Program, Department of History, 
Social Sciences and Social Work, 
Northwestern State University, 
Natchitoches, La. 71497. 

Wesley foundation 

The Wesley Foundation, lo- 
cated at 520 College Avenue, offers 
weekly services and activities. Events 
offered include a 5 p.m. worship serv- 
ice followed by a 5:30 p.m. snack sup- 
per each Sunday. Mondays at 7 p.m. a 
different movie is featured at the 
"Monday Night at the Movies." A .50- 
cent lunch is offered each Tuesday 
from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. A pre-game 
get-together will be held at 5:45 p.m. 
each Saturday on home game dates. 
All students interested in the events or 
becoming a part of this campus group 
should call or go by the Foundation. 

Sororities 

The following sororities would 
like to recognize and congratulate 
their new pledges: 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 

Denise Alford, Jennifer Anderson, 
Jennifer Brady, Daynelle Broulette, 
Kendra Brown, Sarah Buller, Angela 
Cook, Ingrid Cook, Tia Cormier, 
Aileen Ellis, Stacy Foglemart, Debbie 
Francis, Kim Gill, Mindy Gold, Janelle 
Givens, Melissa Harkins, Tammy 
Harper, Ann Harrop, Faith Johnson, 
Catherine Lambert, Leah LeGrand, 
Jennifer Lee, Wendy Lonadier, Jen- 
nifer McCune, Kempa Meachum, 
Christy Messer, Lisa Meyers, Angela 
Ortego, Britt Patin, Christi Rhymes, 
Julie Roy, Sheila Sampite, Rhondi 
Sandifer, Missy Saucier, Mandy Sla- 
ton, Amy Thiboult, Susan Thomas, 
Angela Tinnerello, Jennifer Walsh, 
and Prissy Williams. 

Sigma Kappa 

Ranie Blanchard, Pam Boudreaux, 
Megan Bounds, Kellyi Bridges, Ash- 
ley Brown, Teresa Bryant, Stacie 
Cleveland, Karen Cresap, Terri 
Crumpton, Lora Drumm, Cari Ed- 
wards, Jill Jenkins, Mary Ann Kar- 
penski, Melinda King, Deborah 
Lukowski, Rita Matthews, Antoinette 
Montelaro, Donna Sibley, Donna Ver- 
cher, Cynthia Wilson, and Melissa 
Womack. 

Phi Mu 

Kelly Arnaud, Tina Attaway, 
Bridget Bahm, Donna Barnett, 
Yvonne Burnucho, Liz Bonnette, 
Susan Canfield, Lisa Collins, Cheree 
Cox, Kelly Davidson, Theresa Deaton, 
Kim Dowden, Marilyn Dranguet, 
Christine Dunavent, Irene Enriquez, 
Pam Gandy, Amy Gill, Angie Good- 
win, Roxanne Gray, Bonnie Guidry, 
Hope Huckaby, Christi Jones, Carol 
Jordon, Stacy Kay, Candice Langton, 
Dana Linder, Janice Lutes, Leigh 
McLamore, Susan Mullins, Erin Or- 
nellion, Melissa Porteous, Melissa 
Prejean, Sarah Robinson, Tara Scar- 
borough, Elizabeth Sklar, Rachel St. 
Andry, KelleyTavlor. CathvTuschoff. 
Paula Waltman, Katie Whitton, and 
Sandy Wood. 



Fraternities 

The following fraternities 
would like to recognize and congratu- 
late their new pledges: 



Kappa Alpha 

Jeffrey Anderson, Tony Cain, 
Trent Cole, Franklin Cooley, Billy 
Craft, Aberian Crosby, Damian Dom- 
ingue, Stephan Erath, Albert Arthur 
Evers, Jr., Kyle Gill, Daniel Pickett, 
Wyatt Pullig, Chip Reynolds, David 
Shirley, William Gil Stroud, III, Todd 
Warford, and Teke Weaver. 



Kappa Sigma 

Todd Allen, Hal Bird well, Ricky 
Carroll, Jamey Caruthers, Jerry Cheat- 
wood, David Clark, Chuck Cole, John 
Davis, Dennis Doll, Trey Duke, Dave 
Duschel, Scott Heming, Ken Gardner, 
Moses Garlington, Scott Haley, Alan 
Howell, Curtis Jackson, Jack Jenkins, 
Bill Johnson, Jason Labbe', Pat La- 
Grone, Whit Maxey, Sean Mayfield, 
Dee Mims, Jim Neil, Mark Oberle, 
Mitchell Olivier, "David Scott" Sham- 
burger, Mark Soileau, Johnathon Ta- 
bor, and Van Wiggins. 



Sigma Tau Gamma 

Phillip Gillis, Scott DeBlieux, 
Sonny Taylor, Tim Barr, Bill Veulde- 
man, Frank Rosamund, Robert Gun, 
and John Terry. 

Theta Chi 

Geovanny Canizares, Jerry 
Cobb, Kenny Guillory, Chris Hunt, 
Kent Laborde, and James Martin. 

Traffic violations 

The NSU Police Department 
wishes to point out the new fines for 
traffic violations which are now in 
effect. 
SPEEDING 

16 to 25 MPH S7.50 

26 to 35 MPH $12.50 

36 to 40 MPH $15.00 

41 tO 45 MPH $20.00 

46 to 50 MPH $25.00 

over 50 MPH $1.00 per mile 

over the speed 
limit 

Failure to obey insructions of a 
university police officer.. ..$20 .00 
Failure to stop for stop sign 

or red light $20.00 

Reckless operation of a vehicle 
$35..00 

Making a U-turn .$15.00 

Operating vehicle on sidewalk or 

grassy area $15.00 

Driving wrong way on one way 

street $10.00 

Failure to yeild in pedestrian 
crosswalk $10.00 

VIOLATIONS NOT PAID WITHIN 
30 DAYS WILL BE ASSESSED A 
$10.00 ADMINISTRATIVE FEE. 

REPEATED VIOLATIONS OF 
MOVING VIOLATIONS ARE SUB- 
JECT TO DISCIPLINARY ACTION 
AND DRIVING PRIVILEGES SUS- 
PENDED FROM NORTHWESTERN 
CAMPUS 

ALL VEHICLE REGISTRATION 
FEES AND VIOLATION FEES MUST 
BE PAID IN THE CASHIER'S OF- 
FICE, ROOM 202 ROY HALL 

University Police Chief 
Crawford Ficklin said police will be 
cracking down on speeding, moving 
and parking violations. The crack 
down on auto violations will hope- 
fully make the campus a safer place for 
pedestrians, Ficklin. 



ISEP 



I think jealousy is also inter- 
twined in this. Several factories have 
closed down in northern Britain and 
unemployment is high. Shipbuilding, 
which used to be a prosperous trade, is 
disappearing. While walking through 
Glasgow with one English friend, he 
person about his country. Why is it 
that we are intrigued by foreigners 
and they aren't intrigued by us? I 
think it's because they already know 
so much about us. On British news 
alone up to 10 minutes might be 
dominated by American coverage 
because of U.S. power and influence 
all over the world. On the other side, 
British news coverage in America is 
almost nonexistent because of 
Britain's minimal involvement in 
world politics. Therefore, we don't 
know much about them, and we find it 
exciting to talk to them. 

said to me, "Look around. It's dead. 
Britain is dying." To believe your 
country is dying while seeing another 
country doing extremely well is hard. 
Resentful feelings come out. 

Although this article might 
sound as though I have a negative 
impression of Britain, my purpose has 
been to show the difficulty I encoun- 
tered because of my nationality. I 
value my experience because I learned 
to appreciate a different culture while 
I developed a new perspective on 
American culture. 



I hope I may have helped a little 
to settle your mind on matters of ex- 
citement in Natchitoches. If you wish 
to find any one of the places men- 
tioned in this article just gTab a senior 
like me and ask. We are very friendly 
people, believe me. I hope you will 
find that this is true over all of North- 
western and Natchitoches. Good luck 
to all of you and stick around for the 
weekends, because they can be a lot of 

fun. 

Dan Medlin 

Staff Writer 



You can strike 
a plow against 
Cancer with 
qMemorial 

of the 

AMERICAN 
V CANCER 
f SOCIETY 8 



i 



SEP] 



NOR 



Pot Plants 




Flower Arrangements 
Balloons 



Fruit Baskets 



117 St. Denis Street 
Natchitoches, LA 71457 



Off.: 357-1160 
Res.: 352-4497 
Owner: Mary Lou LaCaze 



Hours: 
9:00-5:00 Mon.-Fri 
9:00-12:00 Saturdays 



Un 



re 



Guide 



Sassy 7 s located in the Holiday Inn. The 
age group is sometimes older and 
drink prices are high but the atmos- 
phere is nice. Closer to campus is 
Billiard's, a small but friendly pool 
hall. Billiard's is good for a few games, 
a meeting with the team, and some- 
times an up-and-coming band to lis- 
ten to. 

With this many considerations, 
night life is not so glum. Should we 
compare Natchitoches to less atmos- 
pheric places such as Ruston then our 
higher educational choice seems to 
have many more extracurricular 
benefits. 



Add th 
to the list of t 
Northwestern 
Locate* 
Student Unioi 
store changed 
"""■"mcrly run by T 
^JJ store went out 




Old Fashion 
HAMBURGERS 




i^Vallace's Boi 

highest of five 
Wallac 
largest whole 
.leasing com: 

. , ,. States. The 

announces the opening of our new location. lcases morc 
We now have two locations to serve YOU around the co 
better! Stop by and see us for the best in the 
hamburgers in town at 904 COLLEGE next to Bookstore wa 
Pafs Economy from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Ubytheuni< 

'now a retail oi 
ccording to 
irector, Wall 
iort service t 
tore. The sto 
he managem 
ho has mai 
ears. 

"It'snic 
neouttheres 
lachal said o 

(#1) 500 TEXAS ST. (#2) 904 COLLEGE AVE kinwdou.th 
US 352-5735 352-2711 

"•"^products. 

— 1 Service 
includebcttcr 
-expanded inv 
million used b 
kill allow stu 
books on the 



WELCOME BACK 
ALL STUDENTS GET 10% DISCOUNT 
WITH STUDENT I.D. THIS WEEK ONLY 
ICE CREAM, MALTS, SHAKES, 
FLOATS AND FROSTIES 
ALL AT #2 

Call-In Orders Welcome. 



WE HAVE IT ALL! 



M 



OH Classic Alburn Showcase 10pm 



Guys and Gals 

Welcomes back all NSU and 
Scholars College students 



We have the latest in hair fashions 
There are six operators to serve you 
Look for our specials coming soon 



Located in the Student Union 
Phone 357-5451 



J~U0S Top 30 Countdown £>pm 

VVed 0,cJ ' e5 £p™ 

ThufS Heavy fletal 6pm 
Fri n 6.UJ Album Sfioujca.se 5 pm 
Sat/Sun Progressive 3 pm 
SUP Christian C ]am / J~a.2.z Noc 
Soul (o pm 

KNWD 91.7 FfTl 



r 

J 



] 



ATTENTION ALL NSU STUDENTS 

YEARBOOK PHOTO SESSION 

• SEPTEMBER 14th- 17 th 

NO CHARGE FOR YEARBOOK SITTING 

SENIORS 

BOTH CAP AND GOWN 
AND 

FORMAL SHOTS AVAILABLE 
PLEASE DRESS APPROPRIATELY 

SITTING IN ROOM 240 OF THE STUDENT UNION 

PHOTOGRAPHY BY FOTO FINISH 

REASONABLY PRICED COLOR PACKAGES AVAILABLE 



The so 
become incrc 
residents of ] 
telephone, ho 
The fii 
vvas installed 
summer brcal 
a student or ! 
(been pulled ii 
Ihe exccptioi 
Richard Dare 
ery time the ; 
Said, all 570 
must be cvae 
It makes a ! 
have to take 
are liable if ar 
in an actual fi 
Rapidi 
enccd a fire la 
third floor sc 
time of the b 
alarm system 



Surf 

Non; 
will b« 



SEPTEMBERS, 1987 



strike 

eawst 

'with 

orial 

XOUr 

unit 

he 

tICAN 

:er 

■TY S 



CURR 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA 



'OL 76 NOi6 





OJC 




NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 71497 



skeis 



-| University Bookstore 
purchased by 
retail outlet chain 



Hours: 

:00 Mon.-Fri. 

2:00 Saturdays 




Add the University Bookstore 
to the list of things changing around 
Northwestern. 

Located on the first floor of the 
Student Union, the University Book- 
store changed hands August 1. For- 
'""""mcrly run by Northwestern, the book- 
store went out on bid this summer and 
■ ^Wallace's Bookstores Inc. was the 
highest of five bidders. 

Wallace's is one of the three 
largest wholesale management and 
leasing companies in the United 
- ^ States. The 20-ycar-old company 
W location. i cases morc trian 15 bookstores 
>erve YOU around the country, 
f the best In the past, the University 

!GE next tO Bookstore was a self-generated store 
ran by the university. The bookstore is 
'now a retail outlet located on campus. 
According to Tim Prather, leasing 
irector, Wallace's will act as a sup- 
ort service to the University Book- 
tore. The store will continue under 
he management of Darlene Rachal 
ho has managed the store for 16 
ears. 

"It's nice to know there's some- 
ne out thereand I'm not on my own," 
achal said of the transition. Rachal 
iGE AVE. P ointcdo utthatinthefuturethebook- 
\ t# tore wou 'd enlarge their supply sec 



p.m. 



JNT 



iff 

*Bion and offer a wider selection of 
"""^products. 

Services offered by Wallace's 



ILL! 



o 



ancludebettcr buying contracts and an 
■expanded inventory of more than 3 
pillion used books. Wallace's services 
will allow students to see more used 
books on the shelves, a reduction in 



im 



N oor\f 



Fm 



N 



book prices and an increase in sell- 
back prices. Students will also be able 
to sell books back to the store all year 
round instead of only at the end of 
each term. 

President Robert Alost said he 
decided to put the bookstore out on 
bid last year. "It's like a Wal-Mart. 
They buy more merchandise than we 
could and can offer lower prices," he 
said. 

Another benefit Wallace's will 
be offering the university is the 
extensive renovation project planned 
for the store. Starting this semester, 
the project includes new fixtures, 
painting and rearranging the overall 
layout. 

"The renovation will make a 
defined change in the store. We want 
the bookstore to be a showplace of the 
Union. We would like it to be the kind 
of store where other Louisiana col- 
leges would want to come and look," 
Prather said. 

Wallace's, which will be pay- 
ing for the renovation project, plans to 
make the bookstore attractive and af- 
fordable enough so that students 
won't be forced to go off campus for 
bargains. 

The bookstore will be operat- 
ing during the same hours as before 
and will remain open throughout the 
renovation. The project is expected to 
be completed by December. 

Lisa Darden 

Managing Editor 



Here comes Doc 



"Tonight Show" musician to appear 




Severinson 



Doc Severinson, musical direc- 
tor for "The Tonight Show," will per- 
form an orchestral pops concert 6 p.m . 
Sunday in Prather Coliseum. 

Appearing with the Natchito- 
ches-North western State University 
Symphony Orchestra, Severinson will 
also be accompanied by Xebron, a 
band he formed in 1981. Xebron 
members include Rick Eames, key- 
boards; Tom Rizzo, guitar; Jeff 
D'Angelo, bass; and Ron Davis, 
drums. 

Dr. William Davis of North- 
western will conduct the Natchito- 
chcs-N'orthwcstern Symphony Or- 
chestra. 

Severinson joined "The To- 
night Show" in 1962 as an assistant to 
Skikch Henderson. He became musi- 
cal director in 1967 and has remained 
with the show as director for 20 years. 

In September 1986, Severinson 
released the album 'The Tonight 
Show Band With Doc Severinson." 
Marketed worldwide, the recording 
was awarded a Grammy for Best Big 
Band Album. 

Tommy Ncwson, assistant 
conductor and saxophonist, said, 
"Doc has always been the world's 
greatest trumpet player and his crazy 
clothes just helped to make people 
aware of it." 

Occasionally Severinson takes 
a break from NBC for six to twelve 
weeks. During these breaks he plays 



clubs in Las Vegas and Atlantic City. 
Severinson also travels to orchestral 
concerts and solos with various sym- 
phonies. Severinson will be appearing 
at Northwestern during his travel 
tour. 

Charlcne Taylor, a freshman 
art major and member of the Spirit of 
Northwestern Band is thrilled at the 
prospect of seeing Severinson per- 
form at Northwestern. "I think it will 
be a good experience for anyone that 
attends the concert because it will give 
them good exposure to a professional 
musician and soloist that is not a rock 
muscian," Taylor said. 

The concert is being sponsored 
by the Natchitoches-Northwestcrn 
Symphony Society and the North 
western Artist Series in cooperation 
with the Department of Theatre Arts 
and Music. Admission for Northwest- 
cm students is free with their LIT 
General admission is S5. 

Tables located near the concert 
stage are available by reservation for 
SI 00 per table. The tables, which seat 
eight, also include cheese and wine. 
Advance tables arc available through 
the Department of Theatre Arts and 
Music or tickets can be obtained at the 
Prather Coliseum box office on per- 
formance night. 



Michel© Broomfield 
Staff Writer 



The boy who cried wolf 

False fire alarms anger residents 



Magician to perform 



The sound of a ringing bell has 
become increasingly familiar to the 
residents of Rapides Hall. It's not a 
telephone, however, but a fire alarm. 

The fire alarm system, which 
was installed in Rapides during the 
su m mcr break, ha s becom e a ta rgct for 
a student or students. The alarm has 
been pulled in Rapides each day with 
Ihe exception of two, according to 
Richard Darden, house director. Ev- 
ery time the alarm is pulled, Darden 
said, all 570 residents in the dorm 
must be evacuated. 

It makes a lot of people mad but we 
have to take it seriously because we 
are liable if anyone is left in the rooms 
in an actual fire," Darden said. 

Rapides Hall residents experi- 
enced a fire last fall when a mattress on 
third floor south caught fire. At the 
time of the blaze the smoke and fire 
alarm systems were not working. Al- 



though no one was injured in the fire, 
the south wing suffered extensive 
smoke and fire damage. South wing 
residents were temporarily housed in 
Varnado Hall following the fire. 

The fire prompted the installa- 
tion of new fire and smoke alarm sys- 
tems on campus. According to Loran 
Lindscy, physical plant director, fire 
and smoke alarm systems have been 
installed in several buildings around 
campus. The project, which included 
buildings with inadequate systems, 
was set at $35,000. 

Each time the fire alarm is 
pulled everyone in the dorm must be 
evacuated. The evacuation process 
takes about 30 minutes. According to 
Darden, the alarm has been consis- 
tantly pulled on the fourth floor west 
Rapides, the floor which houses the 
freshmen. 
Since last fall's fire, upperclassmen 



have become more alert to the danger 
of fire. First floor resident assistant 
Brent Brown said/'Maybe if they put 
glass or something over it (alarm pull) 
so we could hear them break the glass. 
But with no protection, it's just too 
easy to pull." 

"I think someone is being really 
immature by pulling the fire alarms 
because the alarms are here to help us. 
One of these times there could be a real 
fire and no one would take it seriously 
because of all the false alarms," fresh- 
man Max Weiner of west Rapides 
said. 

"I think they are going to have a 
serious problem if it keeps up because 
it's going to be like the little boy who 
cried wolf when a real fire happens," 
sophomore George Donaldson of 
south Rapides said. 

The false alarms not only create a 
possible hazard but also waste stu- 



dents' time. "I was sleeping when the 
alarms went off. We walked outside 
and sat there for a half an hour and 
finally got back in. It was all a com- 
plete waste of time," freshman Trey 
Dawona of west Rapides said. 

"As a college student they should be 
more mature. Even once is ridicu- 
lous," Harold Boutte, director of Stu- 
dent Housing, said. 

Although no one has been 
caught pulling the alarm, the resi- 
dents and R.A.'s have been told to 
watch more closely. 

According to the 1987-88 Code 
of Conduct, students caught pulling 
the alarm could face various discipli- 
nary sanctions including immediate 
expulsion from the university. 

Christi Rhymes 

Staff Writer 



The Student Activities Board 
(SAB) will begin its weekly program- 
ming 7 p.m. Friday with comedian- 
magician Charles Greene appearing 
in the Union Station. 

Greene, who was voted Magi- 
cian of the Year by the National Asso- 
ciation of College Activities, offers a 
program that includes small sleight of 
hand tricks to grand illusions. 

"We arc very excited to have Char- 
les Greene begin our weekly program- 
ming. He will definitely set the pace 
for what the Student Activities Board 
has planned for this fall," Kim Antee, 
SAB president said. 

The SAB has a wide range of pro- 
grams planned for the fall including 
Mark Pitta of "Star Search;" hypnotist 
Craig Kargcs; musical group "The 
Bcatlcs-1 964" and much more. 

"Our goal is to have an event 
every weekend, especially on week- 
endsof home football games. We have 
super acts planned for the week of 
Homecoming as well as State Fair," 
Antee said. 

Antee added, "All the acts we 
programmed last year were at least 
nominated fororrcccived aCollcgiatc 



Entertainment Award. I expect that 
with the talent we have coming, the 
same thing will happen again this 

year." 

In addition to offering special 
events and acts, the SAB also offers a 
different movie each week. This 
week's feature is the "Man From 
Snowy River." The movie is shown at 
9 a.m., 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. weekdays in 
the Student Union Addition located 
on the first floor of the Union. A spe- 
cial showing of the movie in the Union 
Station, also located on the first floor, 
is held Wednesday at 7 p.m. Refresh- 
ments arc available. 

Students wanting to get in- 
volved in SAB should go by room 214 
of the Student Union. The SAB cur- 
rently has an opening for one repre- 
scntativc-at-largc position and the 
Lady of the Bracelet pageant chairman 
position. Students wanting to run for 
the positions should go by room 214 
and pick up an application. Elections 
will be Sept. 16. Filing deadline is 
Wednesday. 

Rachel Heider 

Staff Writer 




Intramural program undergoes changes 

Fall events announced 



Surfs Up 

Nona Lodridge prepares one of the boards which 
will be used for windsurfing at Saturday's Beach Day. 



According to Gene Newman, 
director of Leisure Activities and Rec- 
reational Sports, the intramural pro- 
gram at Northwestern has witnessed 
definite changes. 

The intramural program, for- 
merly housed with the Student Life 
Department, was placed under the 
direction of the Health, Physical Edu- 
cation and Recreation Department 
this summer. 

In addition to the departmental 
change, Newman was offered the 
position as director and began work- 
ing with intramurals on July 1. 

Newman said he and his staff 
have worked hard to make 
Northwestcrn's intramural program 
morc productive. "What we've done 
is simplified the program. We've 
emphasized 10 basic team sports." 

Newman said that in the past 
about 34 sports were offered in which 
teams competed to acquire points for 
the championship. Newman believes 
that emphasizing 10 basic sports will 
be more beneficial. 



The 10 basic sports are called 
"money sports." Newman said, 'The 
basic meaning of the money sports is 
that these arc the sports the different 
leagues will participate in to accumu- 
late points for the league champion- 
ships." 

The three leagues for the money 
sport competition are Greek, dormi- 
tory and open leagues. 

The five money sports for the fall 
semester arc bowling, swimming, flag 
football, team racquctball and volley- 
ball. 

Basketball, golf, tennis, Softball 
and track and field arc the five money 
sports planned for the spring 
semester. 

Newman has also devised a new 
type of award selection for intramural 
champions. "I think you need to rec- 
ognize outstanding effort. Right now, 
unless the students want to change it, 
we have an award selection form. The 
two basic types of a wards we have arc 
plaques and T-shirts." 

"1 want to take a photo of every 



winning team so I can make an S-by-10 
glossy and put it up in the intramural 
Hall of Champions. I want to present 
the photo to the group also so that they 
can have it for longevity," he said. 

The point system has also been 
simplified this year. "What that does 
is everybody who plays will be closer 
in points," he said. 

Newman explained, "Last year 
4,000 points won the women's compe- 
tition, with 1,600 points for second 
place. Who wanted to compete?" 

In addition to the 10 money 
sports, special events will also be of- 
fered. "We'll probably have 20 to 22 
special events that arc open to every- 
body on this campus. The special 
events arc just fun exposure activi- 
ties," he said. 

An example of a special event 
would be the tug-o-war held Thurs- 
day. The winner of the women's divi- 
sion was Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority 
with Kappa Sigma fraternity continu- 
ing its yearly tradition by capturing 



the tug-o-war title in the men's divi- 
sion. 

Other special events planned for 
thcycarincludeSaturda/s Beach Day 
and Olympics of the Mind which will 
be held in January and February. 

Newman said he and his staff arc 
trying to provide a more competitive 
dormitory league. 

"Our major emphasis is the dor- 
mitories. Last year there was no struc- 
ture with the dormitories. This year 
we have identified 19 male floors and 
22 female floors." 

Newman believes the students 
arc the most important part of intra- 
murals. "I'm not sure if it makes a 
difference what department intramu- 
rals is under as long as we have a 
quality, well organized, well-struc- 
tured program that meets the needs of 
the student with a lot of student input, 
" Newman said. 



Sonya Rigaud 

Staff Writer 



PAGE- 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 8, 1987 



SEPTf 



NEWS 



Dorm changes greet fall semester students 



Students moving into the anywhere from 1,900 to 2,000 this fall, 
dorms this fall were greeted not only Alost said. 

by Northwestern faculty and admin- Boozman Hall, which houses 

istrators but also by many changes female Scholars' College and N'orth- 
and improvements to the dorms western students, received the most 
themselves. attention out of all the dormitories. Set 

Some of the changes included at $500,000, the Boozman renovation 
the addition of carpeting and mini project consisted of modernization of 
blinds, new furniture, and improve- the building including an electrical 
ments to bathroom facilities. Accord- and air conditioning overhaul, Lind- 
ing to Loran Lindscy, physical plant sey said. 

director, dormitory improvements In addition to receiving a 

were part ofaS2 million project which facelift and new furnishings, the 24- 
also included improvements to the year-old building also underwent a 
Recreation Complex, Student Union name change. Formerly known as 
and Iberville Dining Hall. Louisiana Hall, Boozman was re- 

Students were also greeted by named last spring for Curtis 
the reopening of two halls for North- Boozman. Boozman, who served 
western students: Boozman Hall, for- Natchitoches as a state representative" 
merly Louisiana Hall, and Bossier for 12 years, was known for his con- 
Hall. . stant dedication and attention to 
"Last year at this time we Northwestern, Alost said ."His whole 
opened three dorms and had space left effort in the Legislature was for North- 
over in those dorms. This year we western," Alost said, 
opened five dorms and had to take Rapides Hall, which was built 
away private rooms from freshmen in 1966 and houses North western's 
and sophomore students," Harold male students, received mini blinds 
Boutte, director of housing and food and florescent lighting in all rooms, 
service, said of the dormitories' open- microwaves in the TV rooms, new 
ing. ceiling tiles and a fresh coat of paint. In 
Boutte said five of the bathrooms, Rapides received new 
Northwcstcrn's seven dormitories are toilet partitions, vanities and flores- 
now open and functioning. Four of the cent lights. The dormitory also re- 
five dorms are filled to capacity, ceived new hallway air conditioners. 
Boutte said. Sabine Hall (1966), which 
President Robert Alost said the num- houses Northwestern's female stu- 
ber of students living on campus this dents, received florescent lighting, 
fall is up by 500 from a year ago. The new ceiling tiles, new patio furniture, 
number of on-campus students is and a fresh coat of paint on two of the 



four wings. 

Natchitoches, which houses 
the Demon football team and female 
students, received carpeting, flores- 
cent lighting and mini blinds in each 
room. It also received new ceiling tiles 
and a new coat of paint. Natchitoches 
was constructed in 1958. 

Also on the list of dormitories 
receiving repairs was Warrington 
Place, the Shrevcport campus dormi- 
tory. Warrington recicved a new roof 
and furniture, Lindsey said. 

Although the dorms were 
ready for students to move into on 
August 23, Lindsey said several dorm 
projects were incomplete. 

"We didn't quite get finished 
before the students moved in; how- 
ever, everything was livable," Lind- 
sey said. "We still have some fine 
touches to complete before we finish." 

Remaining projects include 
replacing wing and exterior doors in 
Natchitoches and Rapides halls, com- 
pleting the carpet project in Natchito- 
ches, installing bathroom mirrors in 
Rapides, and placing microwave 
ovens in Sabine. 

Funding for the dormitory 
projects was provided by redirected 
insurance money from Caldwell Hall, 
Lindsey said. Caldwell Hall, con- 
structed in 1908, was destroyed by fire 
in 1982. At the time of the fire, 
Caldwell Hall was the oldest building 
on campus. 



Business 
consultant 
hired 

Although the new Business 
Department head believes that busi- 
ness is exciting and important, he also 
believes the students themselves are 
just as important. 

Dr. Norton Marks, who was 
appointed Head of the Northwestern 
Business Department in August, lis- 
tened to classical music, fixed a 
student's schedule so she could 
graduate and helped a new teacher 
find an apartment all in a matter of 15 
minutes. It is with this calibre of en- 
thusiasm that Marks plans on heading 
the Business Department. 

Marks received his M.B.A. 
from Indiana State University and his 
Ph.D. from the University of Wash- 
ington. He has been a professor at the 
University of Texas and the Univer- 
sity of Notre Dame. Marks later be- 
came chairman of the Department of 
Marketing at Louisiana State Univer- 
sity. 

In addition to teaching, Marks 
owns several restaurants and a com- 
puter store. He has also served as a 
consultant for several airlines. 

Marks' goal as Head of the 
Department of Business is to create a 
faculty that is student oriented. "I 
want a student oriented faculty that is 
involved with research and publica- 
tions." 

Marks is excited about the fac- 
ulty and his new position. "1 think the 
new professors in the Business De- 
partment will be motivators." 

Marks considers himself to be a 
motivator. "I like to teach beginning 
business classes to get students ex- 
cited about their major. Business is 
exciting." 

To. inspire students, Marks 
invites two students with the highest 
grade on his test to dinner at his house 
that night. "It may be corny but it 
spurns a little competition." 

"I came to Northwestern be- 
cause it was a small school that was 
student oriented," Marks said of his 
move to Natchitoches. 

Rachel Heider 

Staff Writer 



Lisa Darden 

Managing Editor 



WeVe, 

moved 



@ 



To a new convenient location at 
536 College Avenue Natchitoches, LA 

357-1851 



Greyhound is on the move — to 
a new, even more convenient location. 
So now when you go Greyhound, it's 
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And Greyhound goes more places, 
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So next time you go, go Greyhound 
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Call today for complete fare and 
schedule information. 

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Natchitoches, LA 
(318) 357-1851 



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Before you choose a long distance 
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You may be thinking about 
choosing one of the newer 
carriers over AT&T in order to 
save money. 

Think again. 

Since January 1987, AT&T's 
rates have dropped more than 
15% for direct-dialed out-of- 
state calls. So they're lower than 
you probably realize. For infor- 
mation on specific rates, you 
can call us at 1 800 222-0300. 

And AT&T offers clear long 
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You might be surprised at 
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AT&T 

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EDS1 



Ca 



i,N4 ( iti \1i"uml Ijihs. IiK" 



Every d 
vvly improve 
e consumer rr 
enewprodue 
i' approval c 
oduct which 
the prodi 
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iproved prod 
>nt body mai 
ie product is 

;a". 



The pac 
oduct docs n 
t from the ou 
is in desperat 
e still have tr 
: administra 
s shuffled titl 
rcdicntsare; 
dcr. 

A prod i 
tionary as, ' 
x>r or effort.' 
:uson in thisc 
my opinion t 
owed no effo 
idents' dema 
jtion — or qui 
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lep abreast o 
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both the ac 



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"New ar 
This wcl 
n has adorne 
oduct. Perha 
n of Hawaii; 
reo cookies. T 
overused th; 
many proc 
lircd the co 
roductthatnc 
order to sell 

Well, th 
>gan has no' 
oduct right 1 
is. You may i 
ice the users 
icw and imp 
ore careful cf 
Yes, I'm 
wSGA." 

You car 
ying, but lil< 
rase (or its 
leconnotatioi 
lazzy new wi 
We all k 
A" isn't rea 
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natorsand th 
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me to be tr 
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avid Lima 
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"Since 
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bnewhat resol 
>u anything?' 



SEPTEMBER 8, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 3 



EDITORIAL 



Caution: consumer testing 



Every day cither a new or a 
Iw'ly improved product appears on 
consumer market. The survival of 
new product relies on the consum- 
s' approval or disapproval of this 
oduct which is usually determined 
r the product's functionability. 
jmor has it that there is a newly 
iproved product infiltrating the stu- 
:nt body market at Northwestern. 
ie product is named the "All New 
A". 



The packaging of this new 
oduct does not appear to be differ- 
t from the outdated model — which 
is in desperate need of an overhaul, 
e still have the same president and 
; administrative cabinet more or 
I shuffled title positions. I guess the 
jrcdicnts are just listed in a different 
dcr. 

A product is defined in the 
ctionary as, "a thing produced by 
X>r or effort." The word I wish to 
;us on in this definition is "effort." It 
my opinion that the SGA of '86-'87 
owed no effort. No effort to cater to 
idents' demands. No effort of coop- 
jtion — or quorum — among them- 
Ivcs to pass any laws. No effort to 
ep abreast of Northwestcrn's ad- 
inistrativc policy and how it would 
feet the student body. No effort to 
id out the specific demands of the 
ident body. 

The loss of respect for the SGA, 
Ir both the administration and the 



of effort on the student body's behalf 
to keep the SGA i n line and on the ball. 
This lack of effort caused the organiza- 
tion to lose its clout and respectability. 

That is all in the past. We now 
havea new product on the shelves: the 
"All New SGA." With a new name 
should come a new product. A prod- 
uct is a service or a good . Hopefully in 
our daily scholastic endeavors the 
SGA will regard itself as a service. 

We, the student body, are the 
consumers of this product. We paid 
for this service. It is not only our right 
to recognize and utilize this product, 
but also our responsibility to test this 
product to ensure that it is capable of 
reflecting the ideas and beliefs of the 
student body at Northwestern. 

Let us put the "All New SGA" 
to a few consumer stress tests. 

Let us see if this new SGA is 
able to climb the cinder block moun- 
tain of inner department disagree- 
ment and apathy with a "full payload" 
of student body demands and execute 
a major policy. 

Or maybe we should try the 
absorbency test and see if the SGA is 
the "quicker-picker-upper" of student 
body demands. Do you know who 
your class representative is? Does 
your class representative know who 
you are? 

Then there is always that one 
big test we students can apply to our 
new SGA. Perhaps w : e should strap 



student body itself, is not to be blamed 
solely on SGA personnel. It is the lack 
one of the more controversial policies 
instigated by the SGA to the foot the 
administrative elephants that run this 
school and let them step on it. Let us 
observe the endurance of the proposal 
and if the SGA proposal cannot take 
this "licking and keep on ticking," let 
us at least observe the stamina of the 
new SGA in the aftermath. 

The key aspect in testing this 
new student-based consumer product 
is student body involvement. We can 
no longer afford to sit back and watch 
our SGA deteriorate. If this organiza- 
tion repeats last year's dismal per- 
formance record it may again be 
threatened by abolishment, a sugges- 
tion that was proposed by a few of the 
SGA's own personnel. 

We should be grateful that this 
university has a student organization 
to vent our demands. Many universi- 
ties have dropped their SGA pro- 
grams stating reasons such as they 
were no longer needed, were out- 
dated or were just excess weight in 
school policy making. We should not 
let this happen here. 

We paid for this "All New 
SGA" and we should demand its serv- 
ice. Let us utilize this product to its 
fullest capacity and get our money's 
worth. 

Greg Kendrick 

Editor 



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We at the Current Sauce wish to remind the student 
body that SGA meetings are held every Monday at 
6:30 p.m. in the SGA conference room of the Student 
Union. Your attendance and participation is vital for 
the future growth and development of this organization. 

We advise you to become familiar with your class 
representatives and the officers in order for them 
to better serve your needs. 



SGA bylaws: New but not so improved 



"New and improved." 
This well worn advertising slo- 
n has adorned the labels of many a 
oduct. Perhaps you've seen it on a 
n of Hawaiian Punch or a bag of 
rco cookies. This phrase has become 
overused that we often overlook it 
many products. It has even ac- 
lircd the connotation of a so-so 
oduct that needed to be repackaged 
order to sell. 

Well, the new and improved 
)gan has now been attached to a 
oduct right here on our own cam- 
is. You may not have noticed it yet 
ice the users concealed the worn 
icw and improved" slogan with a 
ore careful choice of words. 

Yes, I'm talking about the "All 
ew SGA." 

You can't blame the SGA for 
ring, but like I said earlier, this 
irasc (or its close kinfolks) carries 
e connotation of an old product in a 
lazzy new wrapper. 

We all know that the "All New 
SA" isn't really all that new. They 
ive three new officers and some new 
nators and they've even revised the 
institution somewhat. But it seems 
me to be the same old fumbling 
fort. 

For example, the SGA has been 
boring over revising the consitution. 
\ey wanted to tackle some problems 
at have been haunting them for the 



past few years. You have to give them 
some credit for trying — but doggone 
it, they've done it again. 

After obtaining a copy of the 
revisions, I amused myself by reading 
the bylaws. They almost read like a 
comedy. 

According to Webster, bylaws 
are the standing rules which govern 
the regulation of a group's internal 
affairs. Well, these bylaws arc just 
teeming with guidelines. 

Just to name a few of my favor- 
ites: 

It all starts with directions for 
ordering flowers for State Fair. The 
guys escorting the girls get to wear 
"buttonccrs." You know— button- 
eers. They're like a boutonniere except 
that they are made of buttons instead 
of flowers. 

Well, if you think the guvs have 
it bad, wait until you hear what the 
girls have to wear. They get to wear 
mum corsages. Doesn't sound bad 
docs it. But wait; there's more. The 
bylaws read: 'The mum corsages will 
consist of large footballs with purple 
and orange streamers with all the 
trimmings. The corsages will be worn 
by the girls at the State Fair Brunch 
and the State Fair game." I hope some- 
one has somebig pins. It's bad enough 
that the dainty girls will be saddled 
with big footballs but to make matters 
worse the balls will be accompanied 
with "all the fixings" and will have to 
be worn to two social functions. I can 



hardly wait to see how the girls will 
handle this social faux pas. 

Next wc encounter the infor- 
mation sheets. In order to have a suc- 
cessful State Fair we must announce 
correct information on each of the 
girls. The girls must furnish four (4) 
copies. It seems that one sheet will be 
kept in temporary filing, one will be 
kept by the State Fair chairman, one 
will be sent to the school which is 
helping host the State Fair, and the 
fourth will be sent to Jim Hcnson 
(what happened tojimjohnson)inthe 
Northwestern News Bureau. I had 
heard that Northwestern was hiring 
important people to help run the 
school but I had no idea! I wonder if 
this means that Kcrmit and Miss Piggy 
will be handling future Northwestern 
public relations? 

We now move on to the recep- 
tion. The State Fair reception will be 
held at the fieldhouse and "the State 
Fair chairman shall notify PFM a week 
in advance about the refreshments." 1 
hope the chairman can round up all 
the PFM employees in time for the 
reception. It would probably be easier 
to have our new food service (ARA) 
handle the affair, but we just must 
have PFM. 

Next we go to the State Fair 
Brunch. This is where the State Fair 
chairman really has his hands full. The 
bylaws state: 'The NSU alumni shall 
be invited. An invitation list shall be 
found in the files. The State Fair Chair- 



man shall make sure that everyone 
that is invited to the Brunch can at- 
tend." I suggest that the chairman 
start addressing invitations soon. 

Northwestern has more than 21,000 
alumni and he has to make sure they 
can all attend. 

One of the most important 
aspects I found to be missing in the 
State Fair Brunch section was the 
guideline concerning impromptu 
speeches. It states that "The SGA 
president shall introduce the State 
Fair Court at the State Fair Brunch." 
Doos this include casual remarks 
about each girl's "alluring" beauty as 
she is introduced? 

That touches the highlights of 
the State Fair bylaws. We shall now 
proteed to the Homecoming bylaws. 
The bylaws state: "The guidelines for 
the Homecoming shall basically fol- 
low the same pattern as the State Fair 
Court." This means we can look for- 
ward to the same kind of fun and 
excitement at Homecoming. 

However, "The Homecoming 
Court shall not be provided with any 
form of transportation since this is a 
home game." 

I hardly think that's fair. The 
State Fair Court is provided with free 
transportation. Maybe wc should 
consider holding our homecoming 
game away next year in order to even 
out the fringe benefits for the girls. 

The interesting thing about 



these bylaws is that the new and im- 
proved SGA has gone through the 
trouble of typing five pages of guide- 
lines for an event that is on its way out. 
This year's State Fair is the 73rd an- 
nual and the last. Well, wc might as 
well go out with a bang. 

I've touched upon the high- 
lights of the "All New SGA" bylaw 
revisions. Perhaps you should secure 
a copy for your own readingentcrtain- 
ment. However, I do advise that you 
read the constitutional revisions be- 
fore voting on Sept. 16. Bylaws like 
these may create more problems than 
they avoid. 

Well, as you can sec its not 
really an "All New SGA." Don't these 
topics remind you of problems that 
the SGA has dealt with in the past? 
Instead of working on real student 
concerns, the SGA would rather fiddle 
with flowers and food. 

Although the SGA is selling 
itself in a new package, I think that it's 
probably the same old product. 

Its hard to disguise "beef and 
pork, water, beef hearts, chicken meat, 
salt, dextrose, corn syrup, spices, fla- 
vorings, sodium erythorbatc, sodium 
nitrate, and oleorcsin of paprika" as 
anything else but baloney. 

Baloney by any other name is 
still baloney. 

Lisa Darden 

Managing Editor 



CURRENT QUOTES 



What is your opinion of the new food service? 








'avid Lima 

2, Electrical Eng. 

ew Orleans 



Mary Miller 
2-1, English Ed. 
Baton Rouge 



Brian Meaux 
3-1, Physical Ed. 
Baton Rouge 



Kimberly Ford 
3-1, Nursing 
Los Angeles 



John Berthelot 
3-1, Photography 
Gonzales 



"Since the school has employed "ARA dining services are re- "I've been real impressed with the "It has improved greatly. The food "ARA is an improvement over 

RA dining services, my anorexia has markably improved over last year's Student Union's new food service as well actually has a good taste to it. The only PFM,but thanks. Dr. Alost, for the micro- 

^newhat resolved itself. Does that tell PFM." with all the new ideas on campus. North- thingl dislike is thebreakfast because some waves in Rapides." 

>u anything?" western has really been on the upswing in of the food is artificial. There is more room 

the last two years. " for improvement in the ARA. " 



HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? 

WRITE A LETTER TO THE EDITOR 



CURRENT SAUCE 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 



LISA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 



KIRK COPELAND 

Sports Editor 



SONYA RIGAUD 
CHRISTI RHYMES 
MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
CHRIS HUNT 
MICHELLE WEEGO 
CHARLIE MOORE 
RACHEL HEIDER 
Staff Writers 



ALLEN EVANS 

Advertising Manager 



EDD LEE 

Circulation/Distribution 



CHARLOTTE RUSH 

Photo Ediltor 



Robert Brown 

Layout Editor 



TOM WHITEHEAD 

Adviser 



The Current Sauce is 
published weekly during the fall 
and spring semesters by the stu- 
dents of Northwestern State Uni- 
versity of Louisiana. It is not asso- 
ciated with any of the 
University's departments and is 
financed independently. 

The Current Sauce Is 
based in the Office of Student 
Publications located in Kyser 
Hall. The office of the editorial 
staff is 225H. telephone (318) 
357-6456 The adviser's office is 
103 Kyser Hall, telephone 357- 
5213. 

The mailing address for 
the Current Sauce is P.O. Box 
5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 
71497. 

All correspondence, in- 
ducing letters to the editor is 
welcome Material submitted 
for consideration must be 
mailed to above address or 
brought to the office 

Thd deadline for all ad- 
vertising and copy is Friday by 3 
p.m. Inclusion of any and all 
material is left to the discretion of 
the editor. 

Letters to the editor 
should be typed (double- 
spaced) signed, and should in- 
clude a telephone number 
where the writer can be 
reached. No anonymous letters 
will be printed. 

Current sauce subscrip- 
tion rates are S 1 1 per academic 
year (27 issues) or S6 per 
semester (14 issues). The paper is 
entered as second-class mail at 
Natchitoches. LA. The USPS 
number is 140-660 



PAGE 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 8, 1987 



NEWS 



KNWD slates new radio format 



For the past several years, 
KNWD, Northwestern's FM radio 
station, has infiltrated our airwaves 
with acid rock — but not anymore. The 
station has changed their format to 
Album Oriented Rock (AOR). 

AOR offers a wide variety of 
music for its listeners including old 
gold from the 60's and 70's, top of the 
chart hits and more progressive mu- 
sic. 

Progressive music is the trend 
for most college radio stations these 
days. Statistics show that 80 percent of 
all college radio stations are progres- 
sive. Since KNWD is a commercial- 
free station, this new format helps to 
avoid continuous repetition. 

Station hours are from 6 a.m. to 
1 a.m. Monday through Thursday; 6 
a.m. to 3 a.m. Friday and Saturday; 
and 9 a.m. to 1 a.m. Sunday. The sta- 



tion offers many different programs 
throughout the week such as "Mon- 
day Night Meltdown" which can be 
heard each Monday from 9 to 10 p.m. 
"Monday Night Meltdown" is a laid- 
back, informative program which is 
followed by the Classic Album Hour 
at 10 p.m. 

Tuesday brings listeners the 
Top 30 countdown at 6 p.m. On 
Wednesday the "Old Time Rock and 
Roll Show" airs at 6 p.m. Thursday's 
feature is "Power Tracks," at 6 p.m. 
with the latest in heavy metal. "Virgin 
Vinyl" featuring new album releases 
can be caught at 5 p.m. on Friday's. 

Weekends offer mostly spe- 
cialty shows ranging from progres- 
sive and rock on Saturday to Christian 
rock, jazz and soul on Sunday. 

One of the most popular new 
programs is "Post Toasties" from 6 to 



9 a.m. Monday through Friday featur- 
ing Noop and the Rabbit. "We feel that 
the morning show is good entertain- 
ment, and it gives us a chance to pres- 
ent NSU with information, entertain- 
ment and personalities, plus the latest 
in tabloid thrash," Noop (Jay Mitchell) 
and the Rabbit (Bill Schneider) said. 

Rabbit, also the program direc- 
tor, is looking forward to doing a lot of 
new things this year such as live re- 
motes and interviews. As the year 
goes on, opportunities to experiment 
with the new format and to make 
changes to meet the public's demand 
may alter the current format. 

The DJ's believe this year will 
be one the best years KNWD has ever 
had. KNWD is 91.7 on your FM dial. 

Charlie Moore 

Staff Writer 




Wake Up Call 

The Rabbit (Bill Schneider) and Noop (Jay Mitchell) whoop it up during their 
morning show on KNWD. The two air early early morning every weekday. 



Fall semester brings new traffic problems 



On your mark; get set; walk! 
This fall many commuters may find 
trouble when searching for parking 
spaces near their classes. 

'The problem is that too many 
people are trying to drive on campus," 
University Police Chief Crawford 
Ficklin said. "It takes about two weeks 
for students to try walking and for 
traffic to die down. This happens ev- 
ery semester, especially in the fall." 

Many complaints about park- 
ing are from students who live on 
campus and can walk to class. Fresh- 
man Teresa Bryant said, "Everyone is 
trying to get to class in cars. I think 
they should walk. It's good exercise." 

Ficklin explained that com- 
muters are the students who really 
need the available parking spots. He 
said adequate parking exists for the 
current enrollment. "If, for example, 
people were to park their cars in the 
library parking lot, they could reach 
several buildings in that general area 
by walking." 

Ficklin said the number of tick- 
ets issued and parking violations has 
gone down considerably, however, 
due to the installation of the warning 
beacons, signs, speed bumps and the 
use of radar. The warning beacons, 
which are in effect from 7 a.m. to 2 
p.m., were placed on three major 
campus drives to alert drivers of pe- 
destrian crossings. 

Ficklin credits the speed 
bumps with slowing down traffic near 
pedestrian crossings. In the July 7 is- 
sue of the Current Sauce,, a survey re- 
ported that cars on campus were trav- 
eling at speeds between 48 and 75 
mph. The campus speed limit is 35 
mph on the perimeter and 15 mph 



through the center. 

The new speed bumps, located 
near the university entrances and in 
highly congested areas, are a big issue 
among students. "I don't like them. A 
few are really misplaced because 
they're hard to see at night. If you're 
not careful you can wreck your car 
up," junior Andrea Madison said. 

However, Ficklin said, "95 per- 
cent of the students believe in what 
we're doing. Many of the restrictions 
came about by student request. Driv- 
ing violations are almost down to zero 
proving that students are complying 
with the rules and are glad to see ac- 
tion taken." 

"If there were no or few restric- 
tions, the cars and pedestrians on 
campus would be more vulnerable to 
accidents," freshman Nicole Rodosta 
said. 



"Compared to other cam- 
puses," Ficklin said, "we have the 
limousine of traffic regulations." For 
example, freshmen at McNeese Uni- 
versity have assigned parking lots far 
from the campus. 

Northwestern students have 
the right to appeal tickets they believe 
were unjustly issued. An appeal must 
be filed 98 hours following the viola- 
tion with weekends and holidays ex- 
cluded. 

The appeals' process includes 
completing a two-copy form and at- 
tending a hearing of the appeals 
committee. The board, which consists 
of five members, makes the final deci- 
sions regarding traffic violations. The 
police have no influence in the hear- 
ing. 

Michelle Weego 

Staff Writer 




A car receives two tickets in one day in the Sabine Hall parking lot. 



Dominos Pizza Delivers 




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Pizza & Coke 



s 



Doubles 



9.96 



Order two 10" 2 topping pizzas and 3 cokes and 
pay only 9.96 plus tax. 



2 SMALL $|J (\f\ 
CHEESE W% %M 
pizzas yi ■ %J *J 



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Doubles 



Order two 10" cheese pizzas and 
pay just $6.99 plus tax. II you 
desire additional toppings, you 
pay only 99C lor each additional 
topping on both pizzas. II you 
desire pepperonl on the first piz- 
za and Iresh sausage on the se- 
cond pizza, you pay |ust $7.98 
plus tax. No coupon necessary 
during Domino s Pizza Doub'es 
promotion. 



2 



SMALL 
PARTY 
PAK 





Doubles 



Wnh Party Pak you can have two 
completely diHerent pizzas lor 
one low price. You can have the 
works with our 9 lopping Ex- 
iravaganZZa. and the kids can 
have pepperoni. and you pay lor 
only the 3 topping price. ..an add- 
lional savings. No coupon 
necessary during Domino's Piz- 
za Doubles promotion. ■• 









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CHEESE 

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Doubles 



Order two 1 4" cheese pizzas and 
pay just $10.99 plus tax. II you 
desire additional toppings, you 
pay only $1.60 lor each topping 
on both pizzas II you desire pep- 
peroni on the first pizza and Iresh 
sausage on the second pizza, 
you pay just $12.59 plus tax. No 
coupon necessary during 
Domino's Pizza Doubles 
promotion. 




JEM 



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Doubles 



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Service 

II your pizza does not arrive within 30 
minutes of the time you order, the I 
driver will relund you $3 00 ort your 
order W ^ 

Product 

II you are not happy with your order, I 
call the store manager lor a new piz- ■ 
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relund. 

Limited delivery area 



THE WAREHOUSE 



Health and Racquet Club 

Natchitoches' Newest Tradition 

... A unique concept in fitness 

... Featuring Bodymaster weight machines, racquetball courts, 

sunbeds, individual or group low impact aerobics, treadmill, 

exercise bicycles 
... Babysitting services 
... Designed for personal satisfaction 
... For the young and the young-at-heart 
... Relaxed, fun environment where an individual, a couple, or 

groups from a local business can join and set individual goals 

to achieve optimal health 
... Prescriptive programming available 

Coed Open 7 days a week 

Great Location - Across from the university 



Why not invest in yourself? 
You're worth it! 

357-0772 



William Ackel, Owner 
David Coker, Manager 
Warehouse Health and Racquet Club 
400 College Avenue 
Natchitoches, LA 71457 



Rarqnrthall. WfiphN and Aprnhirs 

Students - $25 
Single • $30 
Couple -$^0 
Family- $60 

Racquetball and Weights 
Students - $20 
Single - $25 
Couple - $35 
Family - $45 

Aerobics 
$20 

Si nhed 

10 Sessions - $30 



THE WAREHOUSE HEALTH & RACQUET CLUB 



DELI 



400 College Avenue 
Natchitoches, LA 

352-3554 



Menu 



Sandwiches: 
Ham 

Ham it Cheese 
Club 

Chicken Salad 
Roast Beef 
Grilled Cheese 
B.L.T. 



$2.00 
$2.25 
$2.95 
$1.50 
$2.00 
$1.25 
$1.75 



Salads: 

Garden Salad 
Chef Salad 
Stuffed Tomato 
(chicken salad) 

Soft Drinks 



$2.00 
$3.00 
$2.25 



.75* 



* White or Wheat Bread 



Coke, Diet Coke, 
Sprite, Dr. Pepper, 
Slice, Orange Juice 



Hamburger 
Cheeseburger 

Po-Boys: 

Ham St Cheese 
Roast Beef 

Potato Chips 



$2.00 
$2.25 



$2.75 
$2.75 



.459 



Phone In Orders Welcome 



Protein Drinks 
Shakes 

Chocolate 

Vanilla 

Strawberry 

Banana 

Pineapple 

Dine In or Take Out 



$2.00 
$1.25 



Beer 



$1.00 



Miller Lite 

Miller Genuine Draft 

Lovenbrau 

Butweiaer 

Bud Light 

Beer available to Private Club members only: 

Must be 18 years of age or older and have the following to purchase beer: 

Picture LD. 
AND 

Warehouse Health & Racquet Club membership card OR Private Club 
membership card. ( One year Private Club membership cards available 
in Deli for $3.00. ) 




SEPTEMBER 8, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 5 



SPORTS 



Pemons rally to stun Arkansas State in opener 



=KNWD 



lake your seats, class. It's time 
jor the NSU Demons to teach you a 
ittle something about football. 

Question #1: The Demons' 23- 
upset of second-ranked Arkansas 
jtate Saturday night in Jonesboro was: 

A) stunning, shocking, etc., 

B) the first opener away from 
jome that they've won since 'Tricky 
■pick" Nixon was in the White House 
,1973, 24-0 over East Texas State), 

O proof that on any given Sat- 
urday..., 

D) any or all of the above. 
If you answered D, then you 
pe off and rolling. 

NSU used an effective passing 
ame, led by Rusty Slack's 188 aerial 
ards,combined with the rushing of 
phn Stephens (170 yards on 22 car- 
ies) and Mike O'Neal (2 touchdowns 
jn the ground) to embarrass ASU's 
|idians on their home turf. The De- 
port victory gave the Tribe its first 
|ome loss since 1983, a stretch which 
l|w them go 19-0-1 in the cozy con- 
|nes of Indian Stadium. 

The Men in Purple opened the 
ring after a nine-play, 72 yard 
ve, culminating with CNcal's first 
a two-yard plunge. A flubbed 
p on the extra point attempt that 
Ider Scott Stoker never controlled 
the Demons with a 6-0 lead early 

f 

ASU then scored two six-point- 
^sonal6yard pass from All-America 
lartcrback Dwane Brown to split 
id Fred Barnett and a one yard dive 
v fullback Marvin Houston after a 
jack fumble. Scott Roper split the 
(iddle with both PAT's and the Indi- 



ans held a 14-6 advantage. 

The Demons, who had a whop- 
ping 204 yards of offense before the 
half, answered with a 47 yard field 
goal by Keith Hod net t to draw them to 
within five points going into the inter- 
mission. 

On the first NSU possession of 
the second half, Slack found Floyd 
Turner streaking down the right side- 
line for an 84 yard touchdown pass, 
the fourth longest such play in the 
school's history. Hodnett connected 
on the extra point and, amazingly, the 
Fiery Ones had a 16-14 lead. 

ASU retaliated with two Roper 
field goals after a Demon fumble and 
interception to take a 20-16 lead early 
in the final stanza. Then, NSU's ver- 
sion of the mighty "Purple People 
Eaters" took charge and stopped the 
Indians inside the NSU 25 yard line. 

Slack started the drive to vic- 
tory by hitting tight end Orlan Lock- 
hart for 23 yards. Three rushing plays 
netted 24 yards before a holding pen- 
alty backed them up ten. Slack got it 
back with a ten yarder to flanker Mark 
Mayfield. Stephens rambled for 16 
yards to set up the gamer, a three yard 
surge by ONeal. Hodnett's PAT 
made it NSU 23, ASU 20. 

Brown, however, was not fin- 
ished, bringing the Indians from their 
own 23 to the Demon 22 where, on 
fourth and six, Roper's 39 yard field 
goal attempt hooked left, preserving 
the upset. 

"This is a great confidence 
builder," said Top Demon Sam Good- 
win. "When you look at the stats, they 
had no turnovers, less penalty yard- 



age, and the ball 15 minutes longer. 
Under those circumstances, the best 
team should have won. We were the 
better football team on Saturday 
night." 

"The big thing is that our de- 
fense refused to give up," Goodwin 
continued. 'Time after time they were 
put in a hole (ASU got possession in- 
side the NSU 37 three times during the 
second half). After that last time..., I 
felt that there was no way we could 
call on them again unless something 
happened. Then Rusty (Slack) hit 
Floyd (Turner) and you could see the 
defense get rejuvenated. They got new 
blood in their veins." 

The Demons must now pre- 
pare for their home opener this Satur- 
day against McNeese State, who 
they've beaten two years in a row. 

"I expect this to be a similiar 
type game (to the previous MSU-NSU 
matchups)," said Goodwin. "It should 
be a hard fought, tough game... I can't 
remember McNeese not having an 
outstanding defense." 

In the overall view, the Cow- 
boys carry a 21-14-1 series advantage 
over the Demon gridders. NSU leads, 
however, in Natchitoches, 9-8-1 . 

The two teams square off Sat- 
urday, September 12, at 7 p.m. in the 
friendly confines of Turpin Stadium. 
It will be the conference opener for 
both squads. 

Kirk Copeland 

Sports Editor 



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various movie companies, 
among others. Part-time work, 
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PHHHHRHhHRI 
oiling Up Yardage 
NSU quarterback Rusty Slack bowls over a defender in Saturday's 
20 victory as Demon Floyd Turner and Indian Tim Smiley look on. 

RESEARCH PAPERS 



raf returns 
s NSU coach 

Steve Graf, an NSU graduate, 
s returned to his alma mater to take 
the job of receiver coach for the 
:mons football team. 

Graf, a native of the small East 
xastown of Mount Pleasant, started 
free safety for the Demons from 
79-1982. He spent his practices 
iying against the likes of Mark 
iper, now with the NFL's Miami 
'lphins, and Bobby Hebert, a quar- 
back that has played in two profes- 
mal leagues, the NFL and the USFL. 

Graf comes to Northwestern 
>m St. Mary's High School here in 
tchitoches. He was the defensive 
ordinator there. Graf said that the 
Mary's coaching experience, his 
tying experience here at NSU, and a 
ief coaching job with the USFL's 
Juston Gamblers will help him with 
job as a Demon coach. 

"Coming here is going to 
oaden my horizons," Graf said, 
meday he hopes to move on to a 
ad coaching job somewhere. In fact 
has gone back to school to get a 
gree that would allow him to teach 
the classroom, a requirement of 
ny high school coaching jobs. 

Graf is not only a full time 
ach. He is also a family man. He has 
wife, Sherry, and an eightecn- 
Onth-old daughter, Brittany Marie, 
lerry is from Natchitoches. 

Graf's top three receivers this 
arare third-year-men Floyd Turner, 
Edwards, and Mark Mayfield. 

"Mark and Al will be rotating 
and out at split end and Floyd 
Mner will be the flanker," Graf said. 

When asked how the receivers 
NSU today would stack up against 
ark Duper, Graf said that the top 
ree receivers are as good as or better 
an Duper. Of course, Duper has 
•proved since leaving the Demons. 

"Mark was still learning when 
was here," Graf said. 

Steve Graf is still learning, too. 
It he will undoubtedly be a fine 
Idition to the Demons coaching staff. 



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Ymi should have seen J.T. run. Even with the 
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Staff Writer 



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PAGE 6 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 8, 1987 



CAMPUS LINE 



m 



English proficiency test 

All first-semester juniors — 
those between 60 and 74 hours — must 
take a writing proficiency test at 11 
a.m. Thursday, Sept. 10,accordingtoa 
mandate from the Board of Regents. 

This term is the first semester 
that the test will be administered at 
Northwestern. Students not passing 
the exam will be able to take a self- 
paced program through the Writing 
Center, Kyser 339. 

"We want to make sure that 
students retain the writing skills they 
learn in English 1010 andl020," said 
Sara Burroughs, chairman of the Lan- 
guage Arts Department. Memebers of 
that department will read the papers, 
she said. 

Juniors should report to Kyser 
Hall 142 shortly before 11 a.m. Sept. 10 
to be assigned a room. Students 
ihould take blue books, pens, diction- 
aries, and ID's with them to the testing 
she. 

SGA filings, nominations open 

Filings are now open for sev- 
eral Student Government Association 
senatorial positions and nominations 
for Homecoming Court, State Fair 
Court, and Mr. and Miss NSU are now 
being accepted, according to Jerome 
Cox, commissioner of elections. Open 
spots include two senator positions 
for eat'-, indergraduate class, two 
graduate senators, and three scnators- 
at-large. Although senator-at-large 
positions are open to any qualified, 
full-time student, class senators must 
represent his/her respective class. 

Students interested in senate 
positions may pick up filing forms in 
either room 222 or 309 of the Student 
Union. Nomination forms for the 
courts will be available through stu- 
dent organizations and residence 
halls. Filings for senate positions will 
remain open until 4 p.m. Tuesday, 
Sept. 8. 

Elections for senate positions 
and the Homecoming Court will be 
held from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sept. 16 in 
the Student Union lobby. If necessary, 
run-offs will be held Sept. 23. 

State Fair Court and Mr. and 
Miss NSU elections will be held, Oct. 5 
in ShrevepoTt and Oct. 7 on the 
Natchitoches campus. 

Those seeking Senate positions 
must post an election deposit of $10. 
The deposit will be returned if all 
signs, banners and other campaign 
materials are removed from campus 
within 48 hours of the election. 

Pictures of all qualified candi- 
dates will appear in the Current Sauce 
prior to elections. Candidate pictures 
will be taken from 4 to 6 p.m. Wednes- 
day, Sept. 9 in the NSU Photo Lab, 
located on the first floor of Kyser Hall. 

Each candidate has the option 
of submitting a 100- word typed state- 
ment explaining why he/she wishes 
to be a part of SGA. Statements not 
exceeding 100 words will appear in 
the Current Sauce. 

A meeting informing all candi- 
dates of rules and regulations will be 
held 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 10 in the 
SGA Conference Room, located on the 
second floor of the Student Union. 

Developmental education 

A special orientation program 
for all students enrolled in develop- 
mental education classes will be held 
11 a.m. Sept. 15 in the Kyser Hall 
auditorium. All students enrolled in 
at least one developmental education 
course (reading 0910, 0920, English 
0910, 0920, or math 0910, 0920) must 
attend. 

Beach day 

Northwestcrn's Intramural Beach 
Day will be held from 1 1 :30 a.m. to 2:30 
p.m. Saturday. 

According to Gene Newman, di- 
rector of Leisure Activities and Rec- 
reational Sports, the activity is for 
Northwestern students and will be 
held near the canoe shed on Chaplin's 
Lake. 

Highlights of the event include 
canoe races, a volleyball tournament, 
windsurfing and sailing. Horseshoes 
and pedal boats will also be available. 

Box lunches will be served. Stu- 
dents wishing to order a box lunch 
should complete the necessary form 
and return it to the Intramural office 
by Wednesday. Box lunches can be 
obtained with a meal card or pur- 
chased for S3.25. 

Students who have not completed 
an order form may do so by complet- 
ing the form in the Current Sauce or by 
going by the Intramural office 

Join everyone for a little "fun in the 
sun" at the Intramural Beach Dav. 



SAM 

The Society for Advancement 
of Management (SAM) held its first 
meeting Sept. 3. Several issues were 
discussed including the drive to boost 
membership for the 1 987 fall semester 
and raising money through the candy 
sales and the annual garage sale. 

The next meeting will be held 
Sept. 17. All business, accounting, and 
computer informations students are 
encouraged to attend. 

PRSSA 

The Public Relations Student 
Society of America (PRSSA) will hold 
its first meeting forthe fall semester 11 
a.m. Thursday in room 106 Kyser Hall. 

The meeting agenda consists of 
electing president, vice president, sec- 
retary and treasurer. Any interested 
student — both' journalism and non- 
journalism majors— are encouraged 
to attend and become a part of PRSSA. 
For more information contact Jimmie 
McCormick at 352-3272 
SAB positions open 

The Student Activities Board is 
announcing the opening of one rcpre- 
scntative-at-large position and the 
Lady of the Bracelet pageant chairman 
position. Students interested in ap- 
plying for either position should pick 
up an application in room 214 of the 
Student Union. Elections will be held 
Sept. 16 for the representative-at-large 
position. Filing deadline is Sept. 9. 
Pictures will be taken Sept. 9, from 4 to 
6 p.m. in the Photo Lab on the first 
floor of Kyser Hall. 
Purple jackets 

The l J urple Jackets organiza- 
tion held its first meeting Sept. 3. The 
Purple Jackets will once again be act- 
ing as hostess in the President's Box at 
home football games. In addition, 
plans have been made for the Purple 
Jackets to act as hostesses during 
Alma Alost's gathering of new em- 
ployees on Sept. 17. 

The Purple Jacket organization 
encourages faculty and administra- 
tion to call upon them at anytime 
when hostesses are needed. 

The Purple Jackets will hold a 
workshop 9 a.m. Saturday. All active 
Purple Jackets must attend. 
Blood drive 

The Louisiana Blood Center 
(LBC) in Shreveport will conduct a 
blood drive Monday through Thurs- 
day, Sept. 21-24, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
in the Student Union Ballroom. 

The Student Government As- 
sociation is sponsoring the drive in 
which donors will be given free scrub 
shirts. 

According to Phil England, 
donor recruiter for the Shreveport 
office of LBC, the Shreveport office 
annually draws some 40,000 units of 
blood during drives which its staff 
conduct throughout an 11-parish 
area. 

England said that blood from 
3,200 people mustbedrawn and proc- 
essed monthly in order for the Shre- 
veport office to maintain an adequate 
supply of blood. 

England said the Shreveport 
office and four other LBC facilities 
located statewide are responsible for 
serving 67 hospitals in 35 parishes. 
Substance abuse programs 

Two substance abuse organi- 
zations will begin' meeting this week 
in the Student Union. The groups will 
be sponsored by the University Sub- 
stance Abuse Program. 

Narcotics Anonymous will 
meet every thursday from 6:30 to 7:30 
p.m. in room 315 of the Student Union 
beginning Sept. 10. 

Alcoholics Anonymous will 
meet every monday from 6:30 to 7:30 
p.m.inroom315oftheStudent Union. 

For more information contact 
Judith Lott, coordinator for the Uni- 
versity Substance Abuse Program, at 
357-5351. 

BACCHUS 

The Boost Alcohol Conscious- 
ness Concerning the Health of Univer- 
sity Students organization (BAC- 
CHUS) will have an open meeting 
Thursday in room 321 of the Student 
Union. 

BACCHUS is an alcohol 
awareness and education program on 
college and university campuses 
which promotes responsible use of 
beverage alcohol. 



Wesley foundation 

The Wesley Foundation, lo- 
cated at 520 College Avenue, offers 
weekly services and activities. Events 
offered include a 5 p.m. worship serv- 
ice followed by a 5:30 p.m. snack sup- 
per each Sunday. Mondays at 7 p.m. a 
different movie is featured at the 
"Monday Night at the Movies." A .50- 
cent lunch is offered each Tuesday 
from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. A pre-game 
get-together will be held at 5:45 p.m. 
each Saturday on home game dates. 
All students interested in thceventsor 
becoming a part of this campus group 
should call or go by the Foundation. 
Fund raiser 

The Wesley Foundation will 
have a fundraiser meal 5 p.m. Thurs- 
day to support future events funded 
by the Wesley Foundation. The sup- 
per will cost S3 per plate and will 
consist of a spaghetti dinner with all 
the trimmings. 

Women's club 



Northwestern State 
University's Campus Women's Club 
has elected officers for the current 
school year. Officers for the 1987-88 
year are Julia Hildebrand, president; 
Ameila Williams, vice president; Jean- 
ette Gregory, secretary-treasurer; 
Anita Pearce, publicity chairman; and 
Francis Conine and Susan Smith, 
scholarship chairmen. 

In addition to electing officers, 
the Women's Club has announced a 
schedule of activities. The first event is 
the Sept. 21 salad supper. Other high- 
lights include the annual President's 
reception set for Dec. 1 3, a dinner prior 
to a Northwestern basketball game on 
Jan. 30, and a family picnic slated for 
May 5. 

The Club is planning to publish 
a cookbook of recipes from North- 
western alumni across the state and 
nation. This and other fund raising 
events will be held in order to estab- 
lish a Campus Women's Club Scholar- 
ship at Northwestern. 



Membership of the Campus 
Women's Club is comprised of facultv 
and staff of Northwestern and the 
Louisiana School for Match, Science 
and the Arts or their spouses. Hilde- 
brand said, 'The Campus Women's 
Club is a positive and influential force 
in helping our university reach its full 
potential for quality education and 
outstanding service in a warm and 
friendly atmosphere." 

Individuals interested in Cam- 
pus Women's Club - membership 
should contact Jcanctte Gregory, Rt. 6 
Box 378, Natchitoches. 



SEPT 



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9:00-12:00 Saturdays 



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ATTENTION ALL NSU STUDENTS 

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The "Patch" - a fast-food family restaurant. © 



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A ligh 
||-foot oak ti 
Irs in front o 
mm Accordii 
Jport, the in 
K p.m. on t 
lall parking 

Accore 
led by NSL 
Jan Hook, uf 
'm noticed 
arown acros 
ifthe pieces r 
let in length 

Debris 
arownabou 
pipact in a 
lie was inju: 

Seven 
lows were i 
iave. Two 
Slendered imi 
(mobile Cut! 
bout 45 fee 
lont left pan 
H a four-foe 

Anotr 
Ihrvslcr Co 
let from the 
jamage to it 

Card 

y Michelle 
icrff Writer 

Thanl. 
sitive attiti 
niversity rr 
jus-oriented 
ext few yea 
Them 
jy cards. Ins 
rell, house < 
he activity ( 
ride variety 
Available on 
lards can be 
jhe$10card 
[-shirt, a S< 
Jialloween c 
Inces, game; 

The $ 
hing on the 
jiving dinnc 
'heck cashin 
jsurvival kit 
The ic 
fcise money 
hSabine.ini 
Vents and s 
I) purchase j 
cave bakew 
the kite 
!ing remoi 
lude purchi 
toning boar 

Black 
hanges in 
hstallationc 
We already 

\RA 

*y LISA DA 
Managing 



Studi 
union and 
have noticei 
temester. 

Nort 
Were placei 
Df a new fc 
tag. 1. AF 
food Serv 
jKrhich had 
campus fo; 
^RA was < 
Submit bid; 

AR/ 
Son-to-leas 
Western am 
'hese years 
Opening m 
idude impn 
both cafetc 
cooking eq 
Variety of < 
appearand 

Ace 
trict manaj 
'Wo food s> 
schools na 
Versities ir 
With ARA 

"W> 
With the fc 
think it is | 



3 SEPTEMBER W, 1987 



kets 



. 1987 













CURR 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA 




VOU76 NO J 




NATCHITOCHES, LOUiS^ANA 71497 



00 Mon.-Fri. 
:00 Saturdays 



lightning strikes _ Incidents report ed to campus police 



| GREG KENDRICK 
ifor 



mm 



A lightning bolt destroyed a 
p-foot oak tree and damaged seven 
Irs in front of Bossier hall last Thurs- 
iy. According to a University Police 
■port, the incident occurred around 
1)5 p.m. on the north side of Bossier 
all parking lot. 

According to the police report 
ed by NSU police officer William 
an Hook, upon arriving on the scene 
noticed large pieces of wood 
irown across the parking lot. Some 
|the pieces ranged from three to four 
let in length. 

Debris and wood chunks were 
Irown about 75 feet from the point of 
npact in a southerly direction. No 
ne was injured in the incident. 

Seven cars and several win- 
pws were damaged in the Shock- 
wave. Two of the seven cars were 
i mdered immobile. A gold 1979 Old- 
j mobile Cutlass, which was parked 
*bout 45 feet from the oak, had its 
] ont left panel and battery destroyed 
| <f a four-foot chunk of the tree. 

Another car, a dark blue 1982 
Ihrysler Cordoba, parked about 80 
let from the tree, received excessive 
pmage to its left rear quarter panel. 



The force of the bolt was so great tnat 
a piece of the tree passed through the 
left rear tire and lodged into the right 
front tire. 

Damages among other ve- 
hicles included a blown out window, 
scratches and dents on sides and 
hoods, and flat tires. 

The closest car to the tree, a 
1981 Pontiac hatchback, was buried 
up to the roof in branches and debris 
but escaped with only minor 
scratches. 

The police report also said five 
windows were blown out of Bossier 
Hall from the shock wave. 

Sergeant Major Harmon, of 
Northwestern's Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps (ROTC), was conduct- 
ing exercise drills about 100 yards 
from Bossier Hall parking lot when 
the lightning bolt struck. 

"When I saw the blast, I 
thought a bomb had gone off," Har- 
mon said. "There was a big red flash 
of light, you could feel the heat and the 
shock of the explosion from where we 
were standing." 

ROTC member Jeffrey Snow, a 
junior from Shreveport, said he could 
feel the shock wave. "The sky lit up 
and everything shook for a few sec- 
onds," Snow said. "I didn't know 
what happened." 



By LISA DARDEN 
Managing Editor 

University Police were kept 
busy this past weekend with several 
incidents reported. 

The incidents began with a 
break-in to the Student Union Thurs- 
day night. The break-in was discov- 
ered Friday at 7:15 a.m. by Paula 
Robertson, secretary of the Student 
Activities office. 

Robertson said she discovered 
broken glass in front of the University 
Bookstore Friday morning while 
opening the building. She called Uni- 
versity Police and then checked the 
rest of the building. At this time, 
Robertson discovered their was 
break-in at the Union Station. 

University Police Chief 



Crawford Ficklin said that the suspect 
hid in the building as it was locked at 
10:30 p.m. Thursday by the janitor. A 
window in the President's Room, 
currently under construction, was 
broken. Ficklin said that he thinks the 
thief left the building through the 
window. 

Ficklin said the robber care- 
fully searched several areas of the 
Student Union including the book- 
store and Union Station. The robber 
entered the bookstore by breaking out 
a plate glass window at the front of the 
store. Two plexiglass windows were 
removed to enter Union Station. 

Taken in the robbery was 23 
cents from the bookstore and several 
cans of beer from Union Station. Al- 
though the robber did not take much, 
he did several hundred dollars worth 
of damage by breaking out three 



windows and the glass cooler top in 
the union station. 

'The person was very destruc- 
tive breaking in and out of areas. This 
indicates that he has been in the busi- 
ness before," Ficklin said. 

Ficklin said the robber appar- 
ently knew the building because spe- 
cific light breakers were thrown. 
These breakers control the areas of the 
Union vandalized and also control the 
traffic lights in front of the Union. The 
traffic lights started flashing at about 
10:35 p.m. Thursday. At first, police 
believed they were flashing due to 
bad weather. 

According to Darlene Rachal, 
the robber searched the bookstore but 
was unable to find any money since 
no money is left in the store overnight. 

Ficklin said the department 
has two strong suspects in the case. 



Also reported to University 
Police was a fight during the Demon 
football game Saturday. Police were 
called to the game to break up a fight 
between two student groups. One 
student was removed from the game. 

Directly following the game 
police were called to another incident. 
According to Jerry Pierce, executive 
assistant to the president, a man was 
stabbed in front of the Intramural 
Building at about 10 p.m. Richard 
Battersby of Fort Polk was stabbed by 
a male who was reportedly harassing 
a group of women. According to Bat- 
tersby, he was stabbed when he 
stepped in to protect the women. 

Battersby, who is not a North- 
western student, was hospitalized 
Saturday and released Monday. 

The police have no suspects in 
the case. 



!ards created for residents 



y Michelle Weego 
taff Writer 

Thanks to a new idea and a 
ositive attitude, Northwestern State 
hiversity may become a more cam- 
us-oriented university within the 
Bxt few years. 

The new idea is the use of activ- 
y cards. Instigated by Phyllis Black- 
'ell, house director for Sabine Hall, 
le activity cards offer its holders a 
de variety of services and events, 
vailable only to Sabine residents, the 
dscan be purchased for $10 or $15. 
e $10 card package includes a dorm 
I-shirt, a September pool party, a 
Halloween costume party, and appli- 
ances, gameand magazine checkouts. 

The $15 card includes every- 
hing on the $10 card plus a Thanks- 
iving dinner, wake-up call service, 
iieck cashing, change for money and 
survival kit during final exam week. 

The idea behind the cards is to 
bise money for social programming 
h Sabine. In addition to the scheduled 
ivents and services, Blackwell hopes 
p purchase pots, pans, mixers, micro- 
wave bakeware and other appliances 
t>r the kitchen which is currently 
leing remodeled. Future plans in- 
lude purchasing such appliances as 
"oning boards and vacuum cleaners. 

Blackwell also hopes to make 
ranges in the lobby including the 
kstallation of carpet. Sofas and chairs 
«ve already been arranged to make it 



more adaptable for a group environ- 
ment. 

'The whole idea is to make the 
students feel as if they were at home," 
Blackwell said. 

A major aim is to give the resi- 
dents a chance to feel like neighbors. It 
also gives residents a chance to help 
build the Northwestern community 
atmosphere. 

These planned activities will 
take a lot of work. "Right no w I am the 
committee," said Blackwell. "It takes 
a lot more than me to make this Hal- 
loween party in October." 

"I want the residents to help; to 
know they are needed and are impor- 
tant, i ney need to take part but aiso 
enjoy what they're doing," Blackwell 
said. 

Blackwell said she had no 
problem in getting the program 
started. The school administration set 
up the fund with $75 which bought 
the dorm T-shirts and paint. 

"This program would be bene- 
ficial in any dorm," Blackwell said. 
"You need to feel proud of where you 
live and you also need to take a re- 
sponsibility for that involvement." 

Blackwell graduated from 
Mississippi State University and is 
currently working on her master's 

degree in Student Personnel Services 
at Northwestern. While at Mississippi 
State, Blackwell utilized the idea of 
activity cards. 




A tire was destroyed 

(above) after a piece of wood 
was forced through when a 
lightning bolt destroyed a tree 
75 feet away. The stump of the 
oak tree (far right) is all that 
remains after it was struck by 
lightning Thursday. Students 
examine a car (right) buried by 
debris. The car escaped with 
minimal damage. 




4RA brings changes to campus cafeterias journalism department 

Alost said of the new food service. including cafe, sizzling, vegetarian DUdlU IU 1CV1CVV J X llll^lll 



ly LISA DARDEN 
Managing Editor 

Students eating in the Student 
Jnion and Iberville cafeterias may 
kave noticed major changes from last 

fcmester. 

Northwestern's two cafeterias 
vere placed under the management 
>f a new food service — ARA — as of 
tag. 1. ARA replaced Professional 
fcod Service Management (PFM) 
Which had been on Northwestern's 
Campus for more than four years. 
^RA was one of two companies to 
»ubmit bids to Northwestern. 

ARA landed a five-year op- 
Kon-to-lease contract with North- 
Western and plans to make the most of 
fhese years, according to Jim Pipes, 
Opening manager. ARA's plans in- 
clude improving the quality of food in 
both cafeterias, replacing outdated 
cooking equipment, offering a larger 



Alost said of the new food service 

ARA offers four meal plans for 
Northwestern students. Students 
dining in Iberville can purchase either 
a $500 19-meals-per week plan or a 
$422 14-meals-per-week plan. The 
average cost of a meal on the 19-meal 
plan is $1.66. 

Students who are eligible to 
dine in both Iberville and the Student 
Union have the option of purchasing 
variable cards. A variable A card costs 
$580 and Variable B is $100. Although 
the variable cards are more flexible, 
they have a declining balance and al- 
low only dollar for dollar transac- 
tions. 

James Taylor, director of board 
operations, is the manager of Iberville 
Dining Hall. Taylor said ARA has 
many plans for improving both the 
food and atmosphere in Iberville. 

"We want to keep students on 
the edge of their seats. We're creating 
something different for the students 



Variety of entrees and improving the and they can expect more changes, 



appearances of both cafeterias 
i According to Ron Patton, dis- 
trict manager, ARA is one of the top 
ttwo food services and operates at 260 
schools nationwide. Three other uni- 
versities in Louisiana have contracts 

With ARA. 

"We- are extremely pleased 
With the food service contract and we 
J think it is going to be infinitely better 
sS^for the students, 



President Robert 



Taylor said. 

One of the most noticeable 
changes to Iberville is the wider selec- 
tion of food offered during each meal. 
Iberville will offer a rotating weekly 
serving line featuring Cajun, Mexi- 
can, Chinese foods and a pasta line. 
Two of the four features will be of- 
fered each week. 

In addition to offering a rotat- 
ing entree plan, standard features 



including cafe, sizzling, vegetarian 
and deli lines will be available. The 
cafe line features two entrees and a 
choice of six vegetables per meal. The 
sizzling line features hot sandwiches 
such as hot dogs, hamburgers and 
toasted sandwiches. The deli line will 
offer cold cuts and the vegetarian line 
will offer a wide variety of vegetables. 

Breakfast will include four 
varieties of eggs, two meats, pancakes 
and waffles and eight types of cereals. 

Iberville will offer a special 
feature each week, a steak night once 
a month and a buffet night once a 
month. "We want the students to eat 
in Iberville and we want them to walk 
away with a full stomach," Taylor 
said. 

In addition to increasing and 
enhancing the food offerings, aes- 
thetic improvements have been made 
to the cafeteria. ARA has placed a 
variety of green plants throughout the 
cafeteria and has plans for more. 

"We are trying to get away 
from the cafeteria atmosphere to a 
restaurant atmosphere where stu- 
dents will want to sit down and eat," 
Taylor said. 

ARA has also ordered lighted 
menu boards which will be placed 
above the entrance ways to the serving 

see Food service 

on page seven 



By Michele Broomfield 
Staff Writer 



A review board with the Board 
of Regents will visit Northwestern, 
Louisiana Tech, Grambling and 
Northeast universities during the 
week of September 20-26 in order to 
critique the undergraduate programs 
in mass comunications and journal- 
ism. 

The team will visit Northwest- 
ern Tuesday, Sept. 22. During their 
stay the board will tour the journalism 
facilities and have a working lunch- 
eon with officials on campus. They 
will also meet with each member of 
the journalism faculty for 20 minutes. 

The review board, empowered 
by the state constitution, decides 
which programs are necessary and 
which programs should be deleted. 
Dr. Ed ward Graham, vice president of 
academic affairs for Northwestern, 
said suggestions as to curricula, 
equipment and faculty can be made. 
Although the team can also suggest 
faculty changes, Graham felt this was 
unlikely. He said the board has never 
made such suggestions and he 
doesn't expect the team to make such 
a suggestion during this review. 

According to Graham, when 
the Board of Regents was formed in 



1974 they took on a "herculean" task. 
Graham said the board began trying 
to review all programs within the 
educational system. Reviewing began 
around 1975 with the doctorate pro- 
grams and moved down to the under- 
graduate programs. Graham said 
once the board completes its task, it 
will probably begin reviewing all of 
the programs again. 

For their trip to Northwestern, 
handouts have been printed for each 
member of the review board explain- 
ing the three journalism programs, 
justification for program continu- 
ation, and faculty competencies. In- 
cluded in the handouts is a list of 
changes made in the journalism pro- 
gram, faculty and equipment. 

According to Tommy 
Whitehead, student media adviser, 
journalism courses have been up- 
graded to contain components neces- 
sary to comply with the guidelines of 
the Accrediting Council on Education 
in Journalism and Mass Communica- 
tions (ACEJMC). Whitehead said 
Northwestern is not applying for ad- 
mittance into the ACEJMC but 
wanted its curriculum to be in line 
with their guidelines. 

In the journalism department, 
one full-time teacher and two ad- 
juncts have been added to the faculty. 
John Tarver transferred to North- 



western for a teaching position this 
fall from LSU in Baton Rouge. While 
at LSU he worked with the public 
relations department at the Louisiana 
Agriculture and Extension Service. 

Dr. John Merrill, employed asa 
journalism professor, travels to 
Northwestern to teach a class in jour- 
nalism ethics. Connie Ledoux, a 
graduate student of Northwestern, is 
teaching introduction to television. 

In addition to basic remodel- 
ing and painting, other improve- 
ments have been made to 
Northwestern's Journalism Depart- 
ment. Changes include a complete 
Apple Macintosh computer center 
located in the Current Sauce and Pot- 
pourri offices on the second floor of 
Kyser Hall. The computer center con- 
tains 18 computers and two printer 
systems. Whitehead said the com- 
puter center, which will be used for 
both news editorial and public rela- 
tions classes, cost about 540,000. 

Equipment has also been 
bought for the broadcasting classes. 
Students will have theuseof fourncw 
camcorders and two editing systems. 
Whitehead estimated thebroadcating 
equipment to cost around $18,000. 

see Regents' 
review 

on page seven 



September 15. 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 2 1 



NEWS 



$epterr 



fLECTI 



University police increase staff 



By CHARLIE MOORE 
Staff Writer 

Northwestern's campus has 
become a safer place for students due 
to the efforts of University Police 
Chief Crawford Ficklin and his staff. 

Normally, 15 to 20 incidents 
would have been reported to Univer- 
sity Police by this time of the semester. 
However, only one minor altercation 
has been reported and is currently 
under investigation. 

The University Police staff has 
increased in size due to the addition of 
campus walkers, dorm monitors and 
residential hall security men. The 
campus walkers' program consists of 
12 full-time students — six plain- 
clothed and six uniformed — whose 
main duties are to patrol the campus 
and look for suspicious activity. The 
walkers are equipped with rad ios and 
report directly to the police. In addi- 
tion, they work at university spon- 
sored events and serve as campus 
escorts. 

This fall University Police 



hired residential hall security men to 
be placed in each dorm. The security 
men work from 9 p.m. to 3 a.m. 
nightly. They are responsible for en- 
suring that unauthorized people do 
not enter the dorms and that all en- 
trances are secured. 

Dorm monitors, previously 
under the supervision of the Housing 
Department, have been placed under 
the direction of University Police. 
Dorm monitors are student workers 
responsible for monitoring the secu- 
rity of the dorms. Monitors are sta- 
tioned in Boozman and Sabine dorms 
from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. nightly. In Rapi- 
des, Bossier and Natchitoches halls, 
monitors are stationed from 1 to 7 a.m. 
nightly. 

The main problems University 
Police are trying to control include 
unauthorized entry into the dorms, 
loitering on campus by non-students 
and doors being left open after dorm 
hours. Police are focusing on these 
problems in order to keep theft and 
disturbance at a minimum. 

In another effort to crack down 



on theft, University Police are offering 
free engraving for students' valuables 
from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. weekdays 
in the University Police station. If a 
person's name is engraved on an item, 
thieves are less likely to steal the item. 
Identification also makes it easier for 
police to locate the owner once it has 
been recovered, Ficklin said. 

University Police have also added a 
crime prevention program to be of- 
fered montly. Coordinated by Officer 
Sonnia Baptiste, the first program will 
cover crime and property. October's 
program is on rape awareness. 

Ficklin said moving violations have 
decreased with the addition of the 
speed bumps, beacons and the use of 
radar around campus. About 90 per- 
cent of the students are obeying traffic 
regulations, he said. 

As for parking violations, police 
officers are writing an estimated 200 
tickets a day. Parking tickets are S5. If 
not paid within 30 days, the ticket 
price goes up to $10 and will continue 
to rise unless paid. 



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EVEN STRAIGHT AS CAN'T 
HELP IF YOU FLUNK TUITION. 



Today, the toughest thing about going 
to college is finding the money to pay for it 

But Army ROTC can help— two 
ways! 

First, you can apply for an Army 
ROTC scholarship. It covers tuition, 
books, and supplies, and pays you 
up to $1,000 each school year it's 
in effect. 

But even if you're not a 
scholarship recipient 
ROTC can still help 
with financial assis- 
tance - u p to $ 1 ,000 
a year for your s 
last two years in \(\ 
the program. yJ 

For more 

information, 

contact your 

Professor of 

Military Science 

ARMY ROTC. 
BE ALL YOU CAN BE 




Graham named to vice "president position 



By SARAH BULLER 
Staff Writer 



academic offerings of the school. 
These new plans include classifying 
deans by functions instead of assign- 
ing them specific duties. 
"Right now we are still looking Graham is currently working 

for the most efficient way to improve out of two offices. He works out of the 
the university," Dr. Edward Graham, dean of instruction's office in Kyser 
vice president of academic affairs. Hall at times and out of the vice 
said. president's office in Roy Hall at oth- 

Graham is presently serving as ers. 
both vice president and dean of in- Graham said this situation is 

struction. "Officially, I am only vice only temporary and he eventually 
president," he said. Until a new dean willbeworkingentirelyoutof the vice 
is hired, Graham will serve in both president's office, 
positions. p rior t0 joining Northwestern 

Graham said the university 13 years ago, Graham was a nation- 
administration is "planning to exam- ally-known chemist and served for 
ine the structure of the university." three years as a faculty member in 
After this examination new plans will chemical engineering at Clarkson 
be made to change and improve the College of Technology in Potsdam, 



N.Y. 

Before moving to New Yorll 
he served eight years on the chemistry! 
faculty at the University of California 
at Los Angeles, one year as a visiting 
professor of Chemistry at Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology at Cam- 
bridge, one year as a visiting scientist) 
in the chemistry division at the Oak) 
Ridge National Laboratory in Tenneu 
see and one semester as a visitirtU 
chemistry professor at the University 
of California at Berkely. 

Graham, a Natchitoches HigW 
School graduate, earned his B.S. I 
chemistry from LSU in Baion Roug( 
in 1959 and his doctorate degree inj 
physical chemistry at the University 
of California at Berkely in 1962. 




Henry appointed director of Student Union 



By NAN GOSS 
Staff Writer 



The Student Union has seen 
many changes since last semester. The 
changes include a new food service, a 
facelift and remodeling of the interior, 
an addition of a patio area in the front 
and new carpet in the lobby. 

Along with the many other 
changes occurring in the Student 
Union is a new director for the entire 
facility — Carl Henry. 

Henry was appointed as direc- 
tor of the Student Union and of Stu- 
dent Activities and Organization 
during the second week of school. 
Henry said his duties include assist- 
ing Fred Fulton, director of Student 



Life, and James Meadors, assistant to 
the director of Student Life. He will 
also be in charge of all campus activi- 
ties, organizations and the Student 
Activities Board (SAB). 

Henry is a native of Natchito- 
ches and received his B.S., M.Ed., and 
Plus 30 hours from Northwestern. 
Prior to his appointment at North- 
western, he was involved in the Lou- 
isiana Public School System for 16 
years and taught at area high schools 
including Alexandria Senior High, 



job along with the two graduate assist 
tants Kenny Holmes and Marjori^ 
Poss," Henry said of his transitioi 
from secondary schools to highi 
education 

Henry replaces Camille Haw< 
thorne who was released prior to thi 
1987 summer session. Hawthorn^ 
had been employed in the Studcn! 
Activities Department for eight years 

Henry said he is very enthusii 
astic about being at Northwestern and 
about working with the SAB. H« 



Campti High School, Natchitoches added that anyone interested in SAB 
Junior High and Natchitoches Central or who has any input about activities 



High School. 

"I have found out since I have 
been here just how well organized 
everything is. My secretary, Mrs. 
Paula Robertson, is doing a fantastic 



should stop by room 214 in the Stu 
dent Union or call 357-6511 




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This coupon good for 15 pieces of 
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Page 2 



September 15, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



ELECTIONS 



r 



3 New Yor] 
the chemistry 
of Californijj 
r as a visiting* 
at Massachy, 
logy at Canv, 
iting scientist! 
m at the Oa]( 
>ryinTennes- 
as a visiting 
he University 

litoches High 
d his B.S. in 
Baton Rouge 
ite degree i n 
ie University 
in 1962. 



Inion 

raduate assist 
and Marjory 
his transition 
jls to highe 



Camille Haw< 
;d prior to t 
t. Hawthor: 
i the Student 
or eight years) 
very enthusii 
th western am) 
the SAB. Hj 
rested in SAB 
)out activities) 
14 in the Stu 
1511. 



Northwestern Homecoming court nominees vote for nine 



Of: 

rispy 
icy 








KIMBERLY ANTEE 



VALERIE BROUSSARD 



CAPRICE BROWN 



KIM BROWNING 



ELAINE BURLEIGH 





DEBBIE CABLE 



MELISSA CANALES 






SHEILA DELOZIA 



DAYNA DOOLEY 



BETH EITEL 








MARTI ELKINS 



KAREN GUIDRY 



RACHEL HEIDER 



YEVETTE JORDAN 



MONTE JOHNSON 








ANGELA LACOUR 



LAURIE LEBLANC 



ANDREA MADISON 



MIA MANUEL 



MARY MILLER 






Elections for Homecoming Court, Student Government 
Association and the Student Activities Board will be held from 
8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday in the Student Union lobby. 

Homecoming, set for 2 p.m. Oct. 3, will feature eight maids 
and a queen. Nominated for court are 23 girls from both the 
Natchitoches and Shreveport campus. Students voting on the 
court must vote for nine girls. 

Student Government Association positions to be voted 
upon include two junior class senator positions and three 
senator-at-large positions. The Student Activities Board has 
one position, representative-at-large, open. 

To be eligible to vote students must be full-time student 
and have a current NSU ID. 

If necessary, runoffs for the election will be held from 8 
a.m. to 7 p.m. Sept. 23 in the Student Union lobby. 



CINDY ROSS 



PATTI SMILEY 



KIM WILSON 



Page 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



September 15, 1987 Septe 



ELECTIONS 



SGA Senator-at-large vote for three 








Geovanny Canizares 

As the year begins it is again 
time to elect new representatives to 
your student government. This year, 
although like no other, marks a new 
beginning in all aspects of campus 
life. With the bold new innovations at 
NSU, it is SGA's cue to emerge from 
its dilemma and lead in voicing the 
students' views instead of brooding 
over its past mistakes. 

My name is Geovanny Caniza- 
res, I'm running for senator-at-large, 
and with your support, together we 
can let SGA be the students' voice 
once more. 



Amanda Dunn 

Dear Students, 

All you know about me right 
now is that I'm running for senator-at- 
large. You've seen posters telling you 
that "I will get the job Dunn." I want 
you to know that I'm seeking this 
position because I care about this 
campus and its future — you are what 
makes this campus. When you vote 
for me, remember that I'm always 
open to your ideas and I want only 
what the students of Northwestern 
want. So now you know a little more 
about me — you know that I care about 
you! If you'd like to help with my 
campaign or just talk about your 
ideas, please call me at 357-5706 

Sincerely, 

Amanda Dunn 



Lazar Hearn 

I am running for SGA Senator. 
I believe through effective communi- 
cation and participation we can 
bridge the gap between students and 
the administration. I challenge the 
students of NSU to get involved and 
vote. Vote for me, Lazar Hearn, the 
candidate who will stand up for the 
students and their rights. 



Clint Person 

No Statement Submitted 



Jackie Strickland 

No Statement Submitted 



By GREG 
Editor 

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By DAN f 
Staff Writ 



SGA Junior senators 






vote for two 




Dan Dupre 



No Statement Submitted 



Angela Lacour 

Hello, my name is Angela La- 
cour and I am running for the junior 
senator position in the Student Gov- 
ernment Association. I have been 
involved in this for a year as a senator- 
at-large. During this period, I have 
heard many, many negative things 
about our organization. However, I 
think that remarks and opinions are 
helpful only if they are meant to be 
constructive and not degrading. I 
would like to continue to find what I 
can do to help and not what I can say. 
I hope that more people will involve 
themselves with this organization 
and find what they can do for our 
school as well as SGA. 

Thank you, 

Miss Angela Lacour 



Lawrence Seawood 



No Statement Submitted 



SAB representative-at-large vote for two 



No Picture Submitted 



No Picture Submitted 




Chadd Bentley 



No Statement Submitted 



Vickie Cleveland 



No Statement Submitted 



To: 

the quest 
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m Goss lw T P °' 

My name is Nan Goss and law *' arcl an >" 
a candidate for SAB representative- '> mes °P 
at-large. JShrevepoi 
During the time that I havi. 1 - 1 ' 1113 ^ 01 
been at NSU, I have been active in th§ fc,vorcd °' 
SGA as freshman senator, Phi Muj 
Fraternity, Presidential Leadership *' l ' c ' ^ 
Program for freshmen, and Sigma! 
Delta Chi. 

1 believe that as a NSU student, 
I understand what kind of activities 
the students would like to have. I am 
willing to work hard to see the stu- 
dents of NSU get the total enjoymer^ 
out of all activities sponsored by the 
SAB. 

Your vote and support will be 
sincerely appreciated. 



ATTENTION ALL NSU STUDENTS 

Yearbook photo session 

SEPTEMBER 14th- 17th 

A r O CHARGE FOR YEARBOOK SITTING 

SENIORS 

BOTH CAP AND GOWN 
AND 

FORMAL SHOTS AVAILABLE 
PLEASE DRESS APPROPRIATELY 

SITTING IN ROOM 240 OF THE STUDENT UNION 

PHOTOGRAPHY BY FOTO FINISH 

-REASONABLY PRICED COLOR PACKAGES AVAILABLE 




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5< 198? September 15, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 5 



EDITORIAL 



Readers: feedback welcome 



By GREG KENDRICK 
Editor 

We were off to a good start — 
three letters for the first publication. I 
actually wondered if I had enough 
room on the editorial page to place the 
letters. In fact, I didn't have enough 
room. I had to move one letter to the 
back page plus not title each individ- 
ual letter in order to compensate for 
space. I was ecstatic over the fact that 
I had some student body feedback. 

Now it is three weeks later, 7 
p.m. publication night and I am des- 
perately seeking the means to fill up 
ithe editorial page. I have my usual 
^elements to fill the void: myeditorial, 
jLisa's editorial, a staff editorial, which 
'was not achieved on a volunteer basis, 
'a cartoon and of course "current 
quotes". 

I am sitting in front of a blank 
computer screen (semi blank) with 
darkening dread over the thought of 
'grinding out another longwinded 
'"filler" where some other student's 
jopinion should be stated and I ask 
myself: "Why?" 

It is not having to fill up a major 
part of the editorial page every week 
that bothers me — I like to see my 



name in print — but rather the disin- 
terest among the students of this 
school in expressing their opinion. 

This university, or more im- 
portantly, this world is not the perfect 
place in which to live. Plenty of gripes, 
groans and complaints must be circu- 
lating throughout the student body. I 
am sure many students consider the 
trials and tribulations that occur day- 
to-day at Northwestern as trivial. 
Their minds are attuned to the tur- 
moils and strife of the world. Why do 
these students feel that they must 
keep their opinions to themselves? I 
am sure there are others on this cam- 
pus who share the same opinion. 

O.K., so you are not knowl- 
edgeable of worldly affairs or maybe 
your world is Northwestern. I am sure 
you can dig up some pet peeves or 
compliments toward this institution. 
Any little problem will be welcomed: 
the faucets in your dorm leaks; the 
crickets under your bed chirp too 
loudly; the paint job in the Student 
Union is just a tad too much off white; 
the silverware in the dining hall is too 
shiny; the air conditioner is too cold; 
you broke a nail; the editor of the 
Current Sauce rambles too much. 
Anyway you get my point: if you have 



Northwestern seniors face 
Louisiana migration move 



By DAN MEDLIN 
•Staff Writer 



To leave or not to leave, that is 
the question for many upcoming 
Northwestern graduates. Whether 
I 'tis better to suffocate in this quagmire 
of economic quicksand in Louisiana 
or to get out as quickly as possible are 
Ihe options. Many of my friends are 
j choosing the second. 

Graduate Leah Sherman says 
she'll come back to visit but she's 
having too much fun in Dallas. Hav- 
ing too much fun for Leah means she 
has a great job with a good future and 
doesn't foresee a change. The trend 
does seem to be for Northwestern 
grads to take off for Dallas. It is a very 
glamorous city with plenty of oppor- 
tunities compared to any nearby 
Louisiana city. 

Just north of Natchitoches is an 
exciting little town that most of us 
pass through on our way to Dallas. 
Shreveport seems to be looking west- 

a i JHward anyway as revealed by a recent 

jossand 1 ana_, 11 ' 
presentativc \ rimes opinion poll. Of the polled 
llShrcveporters, 50 percent favored the 
■ that I h a v§DallasCowboyswhileonly35pcrcent 

n active in ti§ avorcd our Saints ' 

itor, Phi Mtt Shreveport's economics— a 

1 Leadership| titlc 1 d like to coin as " Snrcvonom - 
, and Sigma 

NSU student, 
i of activities 
to have. I aw 
i sec the stif 
lal enjoyment: 
isored by the 

ipport will be 



something to say, write a letter to the 
editor. 

You paid a subscription for the 
Current Sauce . You should try to get 
the most out of your investment. Tell 
me what I am doing right or wrong, 
tell the faculty what they are doing 
right or wrong, tell Dr. Alost what he 
is doing right or wrong. It isyour right 
to tell what is wrong. 

I do not understand why the 
students at Northwestern do not ex- 
press their opinion more often. Media 
sources at other universities usually 
have opinionated students pounding 
down their doors in the name of free 
speech. We at Northwestern have to 
resort to "tricks" to get our students to 
speak their minds. The "Current 
Quotes" section in the Current Sauce 
is usually the closest weekly represen- 
tative of an open forum this university 
has to offer. I think that aspect is rather 
sad. 

Please don't make us at the 
Current Sauce carry the editorial page 
again this year. My fingers stiffen up 
on the key boards after a while and so 
does my brain. We welcome any fresh 
ideas, criticisms and concepts from 
the student body that could possibly 
aid Northwestern in the future. 




ics" — seem to be declining fast. Area 
businesses closed a lot of doors in 1984 
and 1985, saw some openings in 1986 
and 1987, but now aren't too sure of 
their chances. Labor disputes seem to 
follow one to another. After a meeting 
with local labor leaders, Shreveport 
Chamber of Commerce President 
Alvin Childs Jr. has called for a "mar- 
riage" between labor and manage- 
ment. Bobby Akes, president of the 
Central Trades and Labor Council, 
seems to feel that Shrevonomics will 
get back on its feet again. "There were 
abuses and excess wage increases but 
also mismanagement and disregard," 
Akes said. He feels good times will 
return. 

Whether or not good times 
ahead for Shreveport are indicative of 
all Louisiana cities is a highly opinion- 
ated question. What trust can we have 
in this state with its questionable 
government, weak educational sys- 
tem and growing defecit? 

My mother got out of Lousiana 
three years ago, my brother five years 
ago, and after one year of living in 
Shreveport, my sister and her hus- 
band are bugging out. In the mean- 
time they are all screaming for me to 
follow. If Louisiana truly had some- 
thing to offer me in return, I would 
feel honored to stay and fight for this 
state, but for now, to leave or not to 
leave, that is a good question. 



The staff of the Current Sauce encourages all 
full-time students to take an active part in 
Northwestern's student life by voting in the 
election on Wednesday. It is up to each student 
to know his or her Student Government 
senator. 

Students cannot expect satisfaction with the 
SGA if they do not vote for the individuals 
whom they feel competent enough to express 
their views and demands in the student 
governing body. 



Relaying a message 



By LISA DARDEN 
Managing Editor 



Change seems to be the key 
word at Northwestern these days. 
We've seen changes in the dorms, the 
Student Union, in personnel, on the 
campus and in the cafeterias. One of 
the most recent changes is the move of 
the Demon football squad from a pre- 
viously unranked position to number 
four in the nation on the NCAA Divi- 
sion 1-AA poll. 

In the midst of all this change, 
however, it seems that some things 
never change. 

I'm talking about the electronic 
message board in Iberville Cafeteria. 
That thing hasn't changed since last 
April — that's six months 

And have you read the mes- 
sages on it recently? If you were hop- 
ing to find out what's coming up soon, 
that would be the last place you'd 
want to look. 

Here is the message: "...This 
week at NSU Tuesday April 7...." 
(Someone is either a little behind the 



times or is really planning ahead) 
"....Alex Cole in Union Station at 7 

p.m " (Brought back by popular 

demand) "....Wednesday April 8 Lee 
Greenwood in concert in PratherColi- 
seum at 8:30...." (Wasn't he here last 
spring?) "....Selectrocution 'The game 
that doesn't match you up, but lets 
you kl9w who's interested' in the 
Student Union lobby all day...." 
(kl9w? Must be some fad lingo I 
haven't caught up on yet) "...Thurs- 
day April 9 talent show 7 p.m. in the 
Student Union Ballroom...." (Is this a 
second chance for those who lost the 
first time around?) "....President Alost 
will have a meeting with the student 
body at 11 a.m " (I hope that some- 
one has taken the time to tell him 
about it) "....President Cox says: 
Thanks for your sbport!!!...." (I don't 
know what sbport is and I'm not so 
sure I gave any). 

Oh, and I did forget to mention 
that the clock is off by about four 
hours and 10 minutes? 

Who's in charge of this mes- 
sage board? Does anyone on campus 
know? 



I had to go off campus, but I eventu- 
ally found answers. 

It seems that the message 
board is a courtesy of Campus Source. 
As long as the current national ads 
(provided by Campus Source) are 
placed on the board, the university 
can place its running messages on the 
top part of the board for free. Here's 
the tricky part: If the ads arc not kept 
current, then Campus Source may 
jerk that nice electronic message 
board right off our beloved cafeteria 
wall. 

And who is in charge of keep- 
ing the board current? It wouldn't be 
the "All New SGA" would it? The last 
I heard it was. 

Somewhere on this campus 
we're supposed to have a computer 
on which the daily messages can be 
typed in locally. The university's 
message is placed on the running dis- 
play part of the message board. 

It's an almost-free service 
which helps to keep students in- 
formed. If we can't keep up with the 
daily hassles of changing the sign 
can't we at least unplug it? 



Have something to say? 



Write a letter to the editor 



CURRENT SAUCE 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 



LISA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 



KIRK COPELAND 

Sports Editor 



MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
SARAH BULLER 
DAMATIA GIPSON 
CHRIS HUNT 
DAN MEDLIN 
CHARLIE MOORE 
MICHELLE WEEGO 
Staff Writers 



ALLEN EVANS 

Advertising Manager 



EDD LEE 

Circulation/Distribution 



CHARLOTTE RUSH 

Photo Ediltor 



TEDRIS SMITH 
WILLIAM FRANCO 

Photographers 



ROBERT BROWN 

Layout Editor 



TOM WHITEHEAD 

Adviser 



:URRENT QUOTES 




Anne Harrop 

1-1, Journalism 
Haughton 



"I've only stayed here one 
weekend and all my friends went 
home, so l mastered. But I'm looking 
forward to next weekend." 



J 



How do you spend your weekends at Northwestern? 




Kevin Hopkins 

4-1, Public Relations 
Belle Chasse 

"I enjoy the many famous his- 
torical attractions in Natchitoches and 
in the evenings I enjoy the excellent 
night clubs. I also enjoy those rowdy 
NSU home games." 






Melissa Frank 
2-1, Anthropology 
Mamou 



"I usually g out with m y 
friends, sleep or do homework on the 
weekends." 



Van Bush 

2-1, Finance 
Baton Rouge 

"I usually go out on the town 
with my girlfriend and then to the KA 
House, but if there's a home game I 
attend that." 



Nan Goss 

3-2, Broadcasting Jour. 
Many 



"/ go home to work every Sat- 
urday morning and come back to go 
out with everyone else in my dorm on 
Saturday night." 



The Current Sauce is 
published weekly during the fall 
and spring semesters by the stu- 
dents of Northwestern State Uni- 
versity of Louisiana. It is not asso- 
ciated with any of the 
University's departments and is 
financed independently. 

The Current Sauce is 
based in the Office of Student 
Publications located in Kyser 
Hall. The office of the editorial 
staff is 225H. telephone (318) 
357-5456 The adviser's office is 
103 Kyser Hall, telephone 357- 
5213. 

The mailing address for 
the Current Sauce is P.O. Box 
5306, NSU, Natchitoches. LA 
71497. 

All correspondence, in- 
ducing letters to the editor is 
welcome Material submitted 
for consideration must be 
mailed to above address or 
brought to the office. 

Tha deadline for all ad- 
vertising and copy is Friday by 3 
p.m. Inclusion of any and all 
material is left to the discretion of 
the editor. 

Letters to the editor 
should be typed (double- 
spaced) signed, and should in- 
clude a telephone number 
where the writer can be 
reached. No anonymous letters 
will be printed. 

Current sauce subscrip- 
tion rates are S 1 1 per academic 
year (27 issues) or S6 per 
semester (14 issues). The paper is 
entered as second-class mail at 
Natchitoches. LA. The USPS 
number is 140-660 



• Page 6 



CURRENT SAUCE 



September 15, 1987 ^ 



SPORTS 



Follow the Leader 

Demon tailback John 
Stephens (4) heads upfield 
behind the blocking of tackle 
Keith Childress (52) in the 
Demons' 39-3 romp over visit- 
ing McNeese State. Stephens 
finished the game with 79 yard 
rushing. 




Demons ranked fourth after 39-3 drubbing of 'Pokes 



By KIRK COPELAND 
Sports Editor 



n 



How do the 1987 Northwest- 
ern State Demons spell victory? 

Just ask anyone who saw them 
demolish the Cowboys of McNeese 
State 39-3 Saturday night at Turpin 
Stadium. You might get several an- 
swers. 

Some might spell it 

- D-E-F-E-N-S-E, and rightfully so. The 

stingy Demons allowed only 187 total 

yards and just 54 passing yards while 

picking up two Cowboy fumbles and 

an interception. 

Others may say that it is B-I-G 

P-L-A-Y. You need look no further 

than Kevin Lewis' 69-yard punt re- 

" turn for a touchdown to see where this 

viewpoint comes from. 

{• Still others think it may -be 

; O-F-F-E-N-S-E, as evidenced by the 

I 502 total yards the Demons rolled up, 

: the most since 1981. 
i 

Any way you spell it, NSU 
» looked like a team with a purpose 
j Saturday. 

The Men in Purple broke out 
\ on top early with a one-yard sneak by 
I Rusty Slack shortly after wide re- 
; ceiver Floyd Turner grabbed a Slack 
; pass ten yards downfield and turned 
| it into a 67 yard catch-and-run. For the 
5 second week in a row, a bad snap on 
; the extra point attempt left the De- 
; mons with a 6-0 lead. 

NSU got rolling again when 
I Randy Hilliard picked off a Scott Di- 
: eterich pass and returned it 13 yards. 
\ The drive sputtered, though, when 
\ Tracy Palmer fumbled the football 
'■ inside the McNeese ten. 

Keith Hodnett then hit on a 19- 
• yard field goal to make the score 9-0 in 
I favor of the Demons. After one of 
I Jimmy Boirier's eight punts on the 
; night, Slack, who had his best game in 
i a purple jersey with 238 yards pass- 
ing, hit tight end Orlan Lockhart for a 
46-yard completion to set up an 
eleven-yard scoring scamper by 



tailback John Stephens. Stephens fin- 
ished the night with 79 yards on the 
ground, leaving him just three yards 
shy of Sidney Thornton as the second 
all-time rusher in NSU history and 
387 yards shy of leading rusher Joe 
Delaney. 

McNeese came out after the 
half by driving the length of the field 
for their only score of the contest, a 30- 
yard field goal by Lance Wiley. After 
that it was all downhill as the Demons 
poured on 23 straight points. 

Slack hit Al Edwards on a 45- 
yard pass completion, then carried it 
in himself from four yards out to give 
the Fiery Ones a bulky 23-3 lead with 
a long way to go. 

On the next McNeese series, 
Milton Constransitch delivered 
maybe the hit of the century when he 
took aim at number two quarterback 
Hud Jackson. Jackson rolled right, 
could not find a receiver, and sud- 
denly stopped, leaving himself wide 
open for the streaking Constransitch, 
who crushed him at the Cowboy 25. 

Yet another big play followed 
as Boirier booted the ball from his own 
territory. Kevin Lewis took the punt 
on his own 31, did a stutter-step, 
found a lane to the right side, and 
followed it all the way for a 69-yard 
return, the first by a Demon since 
1981. 

The Demons were not finished 
by a long shot. On the ensuing kickof f, 
McNeese's Brian Champagne 
fumbled and NSU linebacker Le- 
onard Parker recovered on the 'Pokes 
22 yard line. One play later, Slack 
found Lockhart for a 21 -yard scoring 
aerial. 

Hodnett finished the scoring 
early in the final stanza with a 27-yard 
field goal, ending the destruction. 

"It was a great performance," 
said Head Demon Sam Goodwin of 
the win. "Our secondary was phe- 
nomenal... Rusty had his best game as 
a Demon and the best game by a quar- 
terback since I've been here... Floyd 
Turner showed me some moves after 
he caught the ball that I really didn't 




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Lady Demon volleyballers open season 



know he had in him... Orlan Lockhart 
made two big catches and Mark 
Mayfield took some big licks and 
hung onto the ball." 

Goodwin now has his hands 
full preparing his troops for this 
weekend's showdown against North 
Texas State, a team that NSU has 
never beaten and was picked unani- 
mously to win the Southland Confer- 
ence. 

"They kicked us pretty good at 
their place each of the last two years," 
said Goodwin, "and they've got as 
many people back as anyone else in 
the conference. We've got a lot of re- 
spect for them, but we're also looking 
forward to playing them in our sta- 
dium." 

According to the recent NCAA 
Division 1-AA poll, the previously 
unranked Demons moved up to a 
lofty number four position while the 
Mean Green Eagles dropped to num- 
ber thirteen. 

The pair will face-off Saturday, 
September 19, at 7 p.m. in Turpin 



By CHRIS HUNT 
Start Writer 

The Lady Demon Volleyball 
players know what the word "al- 
most" means. It means they almost 
won their opener Thursday night 
against Southern Mississippi. 

But as the old saying goes, 
"almost" only counts in horseshoes 
and hand grenades. 

The game featured some great 
plays, exciting kills, digs, and some 
outstanding blocks. The two evenly 
matched teams played five games 
with the Lady Demons winning only 
two games. The score was 11-15, 15- 
10,10-15,15-12, and 11-15. 

Depth seemed to be a problem, 
with first year head coach Rickey 
McCalister going to the bench only on 

NTSU next 
for Demons 

By KIRK COPELAND 
Sports Editor 

After last Saturday's 39-3 shel- 
lacking of McNeese State, the North- 
western Demons have another huge 
task awaiting them right around the 
bend. The Men in Purple face highly- 
ranked North Texas State Saturday in 
a crucial contest early in the season. 

North Texas State is off to a 1-1 
start, beating Southwest Texas State 
20-3 last week after a humiliating 69- 
14 defeat at the hands of the top- 
ranked Oklahoma Sooners in their 
opener. Northwestern is atop the 
conference standings with a 2-0 rec- 
ord, defeating Arkansas State 23-20 in 
their lid lifter. 

The Eagles run out of the wish- 
bone formation and feature an explo- 
sive running attack led by sophomore 
Darrin Collins, who last year led the 
Green and White with 603 yards on 



rare occasions. There were some 
bright spots on the starting six. Junior 
Sonja Dale had several kills in the 
second game, and she remained im- 
pressive throughout the match. Team 
captain Tanya Champagne also 
played well with several digs and 
blocks. 

Prather Coliseum was filled 
with tension as the fifth game got 
underway. The NSU spikers scored 
first in the final game, but fell victim to 
a USM rally, and got in a hole early. 
The Lady Demons did come back to 
make the score more respectable 
thanks to the hot spiking hand of 
Annie Bloxson, last vear's leader with 
148 kills. 

Over the weekend, the Lady 



Demons travelled to Monroe to plajl 
in the Northeast Louisiana Classil 
where they picked up their first via 
torv of the season, defeating the Ladl 
Bulldogs of Louisiana Tech 15-5, 15-J 
and 15-8. NSU then dropped match J 
to Northeast, 7-15, 12-15, and 7-lJ 
and Southern Mississippi for the seel 
ond time in three days, 12-15, 15-1 1 
15-4,10-15, and 11-15. 



NOT 



NS 



Speed Demon 

Receiver Floyd Turner turns 
on the speed en route to a 67- 
yard pass play Saturday. Turner 
had five receptions for 113 
yards. 



Although the opening loss is| 
disappointment, the prospects of I 
good season are still bright. 

McCalister has inserted a new | 
offense to take advantage of thtft, NEW! 
team's scoring sensation Bloxson and Ustern had 
Dawn Carlos, who led the team in solo pe enrollmer 
blocks and block assists in 1986. Jjstory thfsfa 

WW .jg^ ^ * m 1 1091 studenl 

IP IP VP U wrjt l *9ttmi 'flHF emester stati 

Theu, 
ntialincrea 
and gradi 
tration was 
*>phomore, jt 
Undei 
limped from 
« | his year, an 

N -W-sM 16.9 pero 
graduate Sc 
jiercent from 
•170 students 




1987 Lady Demons Volleyball Team 

Front row: Jill Jenkins, Kirsten Gernhauser, Tanya Champagne, Anne LaHaye, 
Collette Jones. Back row:Managcr Ginger Craig, Annie Bloxson, Sonja Olscn, 
Dawn Carlos, Tammy Mros, Sonja Dale, Head Coach Rickey McCalister. 



A 



the ground. Quarterback Bron Beal 
will be the NTSU field general but 
freshman Scott Davis will see action 
after his impressive performance last 
week against SWTSU, scoring a cru- 
cial touchdown late in the game. 

Northwestern is led by quar- 



terback Rusty Slack, the SLC's lop 
rated passer, and John Stephens, the 
league's leading rusher. Stephens will 
surpass Sidney Thornton as the De- 
mons' second all-time leading rusher 
against the Eagles Saturday. 



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Managing E 

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to smoothly 
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SONYA I 

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Accor 
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CURR 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSilY OF LOUISIANA 




VOi. 76 NO. & 




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prospects of 1 
right. 

inserted a new 



MSU fall registration breaks enrollment records 



antage of the 
:>n Bloxson and 



NEWS BUREAU— North- 
western had the largest undergradu- 
thc team in solo *e enrollment increase in its 103-year 
ts in 1986. jjstorythfs fall with the registration of 
^ M Wli 091 students - The enrollment is a 
65 percent rise over the 1986 fall 
jemester statistics of 5,272 students. 

The university reported sub- 
kntial increases in both undergradu- 
and graduate enrollment andreg- 
ation was up in the freshman, 
phomore, junior and senior classes. 
Undergraduate enrollment 
Imped from 4,466 last fall to 5,221 
I his year, an increase of 755 students 
It 16.9 percent. Enrollment in the 
jjraduate School increased by 7.9 
tfik tiercent from 806 students in 1986 to 
lH| i70 students this fall. 




The freshman enrollment of 
2,981 is the largest 1 in the university's 
history and the increase of first-year 
students (transfer students included) 
is also the largest ever at Northwest- 
ern. The 1987 freshman enrollment 
climbed by 27.4 percent over the 1986 
freshman count of 2,340. 

Lynda Tabor, Northwestern's 
registrar, said the university also re- 
corded the largest increase of full- 
time students in its history. The full- 
time enrollment this fall of 3,566 is an 
increase of 20.6 percent over last 
year's full-time student count of 2,956. 

Enrollment on the Natchito- 
ches campus also increased by a rec- 
ord number. On the main campus, 
3,665 students enrolled this fall which 



is up by 14.3 percent over last year's 
campus enrollment of 3,207. Full-time 
enrollment on the Natchitoches cam- 
pus is up by 18.6 percent, up from 
2,590 to 3,072. 

Up also are the average ACT 
scores of Northwestern's first-time 
students. The average score of fresh- 
man is 17.4 compared to 15.4 last year. 
The ACT average increased this year 
by 13 percent and is higher than the 
statewide average of 16.9 percent. 

There was a 37.1 percent in- 
crease this fall in dormitory occu- 
pancy at Northwestern. The univer- 
sity has 1,530 students in dormitories 
this year compared to 1,115 last year. 

Northwestern President Dr. 
Robert Alost called the fall enrollment 



figures extremely gratifying and said, 
"The dramatic increases in enroll- 
ment reflect the success of a vigorous 
and aggressive recruitment program 
and the commitment and enthusiasm 
of the faculty and staff in enhancing 
academics, student life and the over- 
ail image of the university." 

Alost said he was pleased with 
the 27.4 percent increase in freshman 
enrollment and with the 20.6 percent 
increase in full-time student enroll- 
ment. 

"These figures show that the 
university is attracting record num- 
bers of traditional, full-time students 
who must form the bedrock of any 
successful institution of higher educa- 
tion," Alost said. 



:, Anne LaHaye, 
Sonja Olscn, 
"alister. 

the SLC's Vop- 
n Stephens, the 
;r. Stephens will 
nton as the De- 
3 leading rusher 
urday. 



Anchor man to open lecture series 



ES, LA 



m ® 

IS 



ers 
es 

is 

ets 




Mi 





Downs 



By DAN MEDUN 

Staff Writer 

Hugh Downs, possibly the most 
familiar American television figure, 
will visit our campus Tuesday, Sept. 
29 to speak to Northwestern students. 
Downs will speak at 11 a.m. in the 
A.A. Fredericks Fine Arts Audito- 
rium on 'The Age of Information." 

Downs is the first scheduled 
speaker for thel987-88 Distinguished 
Lecture Series. He will appear via the 
Ruth Alben Speakers Service for a 
sum of $15,500— a cost of 75 cents per 
student. 

Downs' claim to fame is host of 
ABC's 20/20, the prime time weekly 
news magazine. Additionally, Downs 
goes into the field for 20/20 to develop 
news features and to interview impor- 
tant personalities. 

Downs has enjoyed a success- 
ful career in radio and television as a 
reporter and a newscaster. He re- 
cieved an Emmy Award in May 1981 
for his work as host of the Public 
Broadcasting Service program "Over 
Easy." 

Downs, who was born in Ak- 
ron, Ohio, began his broadcasting 
career as a radio announcer at age 19. 
He joined NBC in Chicago as a staff 
announcer and moved to New York in 
1954. In July 1957, he helped launch 



the Tonight Show with Jack Paar and 
siayed with the late night series for 
five years. In 1958, Downs became 
host of the popular game show Con- 
centration and in 1962 began a nine- 
year career as host of NBC's Today 
program. 

In addition to his career in the 
comunications field, Downs has pur- 
sued personal interests such as writ- 
ing, teaching, lecturing and private 
consulting in communications. He is 
the author of six books, chairman of 
the National Space Institute, consult- 
ant to the Center for the Study of 
Democratic Institutions in Santa Bar- 
bara, Calif., and chairman of the 
Board of the U.S. Committee for 
UNICEF. 

Downs has lectured through- 
out the country on a wide range of 
subjects, including the quality of life, 
energy, the role of the communicator 
in environmental concerns, the explo- 
ration of space and aging in America. 

It is reported that Downs does not 
care for spicy cajun food so he will be 
treated to dinner in a more mediocre 
Louisiana fashion while in Natchi- 
toches. 

Make plans to see Downs next 
Tuesday in the Fine Arts Auditorium 
and give him a big Northwestern 
welcome as you get your 75 cents 
worth of good lecturing. 



Homecoming vote reset due to ballot error 



ly LISA DARDEN 
Managing Editor 

Although the Student Govern- 
lent Association's elections went 
tnoothly last Wednesday, they did n't 
o smoothly enough to prevent a 
hajor mistake. 

Elections were held last week 
D determine the homecoming court, 
Student Activity Board (SAB) repre- 
sentatives and Student Government 
Association (SGA) senators. 

Elections on the Natchitoches 
ampus were conducted without a 
'Itch. Elections on the Shreveport 
km pus, however, created a problem. 

'The Shreveport election bal- 



lot was missing one girl from the 
homecoming ballot," Kenneth 
Holmes, SGA graduate adviser, said. 
The mistake wasn't discovered until 
Thursday after all the ballots were 
returned. 

"We're completely doing the 
homecoming election over again. We 
have to do an across-the-board elec- 
tion to make sure that all the girls get 
an equal chance," Holmes said. 

Nominated for homecoming 
court are 23 girls from both the 
Natchitoches and Shreveport cam- 
puses. Voters will select a queen and 
eight maids for the Oct. 3 homecom- 
ing game against Northeast Louisi- 
ana. The homecoming game will be 



played at 2 p.m. 

Girls nominated for homecom- 
ing court are Kim Antee, Valerie 
Broussard, Caprice Brown, Kim 
Browning, Elaine Burleigh, Debbie 
Cable, Melissa Canales, Sheila De- 
lozia, Dayna Dooley, Beth Eitel, Marti 
Elkins, Karen Guidry, Rachel Heider, 
Yevette Jordan, Monte Johnson, 
Angela LaCour, Laurie LeBlanc, 
Andrea Madison, Mia Manuel, Mary 
Miller, Cindy Ross, Patti Smiley and 
Kim Wilson. 

Homecoming elections will be 
reheld this Wednesday in the Student 
Union Lobby from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. 

Elected as SAB representatives 
in last week's elections were Vickie 



Cleveland and Nan Goss. 

SGA junior senators elected 
were Angela LaCour and Lawrence 
Sea wood. Elected to senator-at-large 
positions were Geovanny Canizares, 
Amanda Dunn and Jackie Strickland. 

According to Holmes, Elliot 
Jones was the only student to file for 
freshman senator. Jones was accepted 
by acclamation to the position. Three 
vacant positions remain in SGA. The 
vacant positions are one freshman 
.senator and two graduate senator 
positions. 

Students interested in becom- 
ing a part of SGA should attend the 
meetings held at 6 p.m. every Monday 
in room, 222 Student Union. 




Orientation course undergoes changes for fall term 




ly SONYA RIGAUD 
faff Writer 

Orientation 1010 has joined the 
fcnks of changes at Northwestern. 

According to Fred Fulton, di- 
Sctor of Student Life, the course out- 
ne has undergone serveral changes 
lis semester. The purpose of Orienta- 
on 1010 is to acquaint new students 
> Northwestern's campus and per- 
itonei and to assist them in beginning 
successful college career. 

In the past, the course has been 
Sught by one instructor. This 
temester, however, the course is 
>eing conducted with the help of vari- 
es Northwestern administrators and 
fcaff members. 

Fulton said the Department of 
Student Life, Watson Library and the 
Dean of Instruction's Office are the 
basic areas controlling the orientation 
^lass 

Others helping with the course 
Include Danny Seymour, director of 



Career Planning and Placement. Sey- 
mour is in charge of relating student 
services to each orientation class. Carl 
"Skeeter" Henry, director of Organi- 
zations and Student Activities, is re- 
sponsible for informing orientation 
students of various organizations and 
their purpose here at Northwestern. 
Gene Newman, director of Recrea- 
tional Sports and Leisure Activities, 
will speak of the various activities 
offered through the Intramural De- 
partment. 

Fulton said he is responsible 
for informing students of student 
personnel policies and procedures. 
Fulton uses the 1987-88 Northwestern 
Student Handbook for the course in 
reference to housing, food service and 
other student life areas. 

According to Fulton, the li- 
brary section of orientation is cur- 
rently being handled in the same 
manner in which it was conducted in 
the past. Orientation students attend 
several sessions in the library con- 



ducted by library personnel. Students 
learn how to use the library, where to 
find specific information and what is 
available to them. 

Other instructors in Orienta- 
tion 1010 include Georgia Beasley, 
director of Admissions and Recruit- 
ing and Dr. Mary Dillard, director of 
Academic Support Services Program 
and part-time instructor for reading 
in the Department of Education. Bea- 
sly will speak on Northwestern his- 
tory and traditions and Dillard will 
cover study skills. 

Dr. Hurst Hall, head of the 
Department of Human Services, said 
faculty advisers are also serving as 
instructors for the course. Each stu- 
dent is assigned an adviser and is 
required to meet with the adviser for 
three sessions. 

During the advising sessions, 
which are offered at 11 a.m. Tuesday 
and Thursday, students are informed 
in the areas of class attendance, re- 
quirements for a degree, grades, qual- 



ity points and other academic areas. 

"The intentions of this is to get 
more involvement between the stu- 
dents and advisers, to make sure the 
program and curriculum are thor- 
oughly understood by the student 
and to hopefully provide a closer rela- 
tionship between student and ad- 
viser," Hall said of the faculty advis- 
ing aspect. 

In addition to faculty advising, 
attendance records are being watched 
closely. Hall said students in the 
course will now receive either a 
"pass" or a "fail" grade rather than a 
letter grade. 

Hall added that a student 
evaluation of the course will be made 
upon its completion. The evaluation 
should reveal how adequate the ad- 
vising and information obtained from 
the course was for students. In addi- 
tion to a student evaluation, adminis- 
trators will also evaluate the program 
in order to offer suggestions for im- 
proving and upgrading the course. 



"The increase in average ACT 
scores among freshmen from 15.4 to 
17.4 over the past year clearly shows 
that Northwestern is not only attract- 
ing more students but also students 
with higher academic quality and 
ability," Alost said. 

Alost also pointed out that the 
university's student credit hour pro- 
duction, which is based on the num- 
ber of courses in which students are 
enrolled, has increased from 58,033 
last year to 69,023 this fall. Alost said 
the 18.9 percent increase is important 
because the university's funding is 
based upon a student credit hour for- 
mula. 

In addition to the increase in 
the freshman class, sophomore enroll- 



ment was up from 2,340 to 2,981; jun- 
iors from 574 to 595, and seniors from 
699 to 806. 

'The increases in all under- 
graduate classes offer indications that 
retention has imoproved as a result of 
enriched academic programs, ex- 
paned student life opportunities and 
improvements in dormitories, dining 
halls and other physical activities." 

Northwestern's total enroll- 
ment of 6,091 includes 3,665 on the 
Natchitoches campus, 934 at Le- 
esville-Fort Polk, 836 in Shreveport, 
574 in Alexandria and 82 in other off- 
campus programs. 

Ihe university's male enroll- 
ment increased from 2,192 in 1986 to 
2,412 this fall and femaleenrollment is 
up from 3,080 to 3,679. 



System delivers data 



By MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
Staff Writer 

Dr. Roland Pippen, Depart- 
ment of History, Social Science and 
Social Work, is keeping busy promot- 
ing a computer system found on 
Northwestern's mainframe. The sys- 
tem holds a great amount of informa- 
tion from a national major data base 
on facts and opinions of Americans. 

The computer system is actu- 
ally a large softwear package called 
Statistical Package of Social Science 
(SPSS). The package contains data 
obtained during random sample polls 
given by the National Opinion Re- 
search Center (NORC). In addition to 
Northwestern, LSU in Baton Rouge 
and USL in Lafayette are the only 
schools in Louisiana using the com- 
puter system. 

The NORC is a non-profit or- 
ganization which samples 1,500 
people in the United States each year. 
The polls, which havebeen conducted 
since 1972, ask about 400 questions. 
The amount of information available 
through the system can be figured as 
about 400 questions asked of 1,500 
people for the past 14 years. 

Pippin is currently using the 
system in two of his sociology classes. 
Race and Culture Relations 4080 is 



using the data provided by the com- 
puter system to write research papers. 
Survey Research Methods and Data 
Analysis 4200 is also using the data 
found in the system. 

Using SPSS it is possible to 
compare local opinions to national 
ones by asking the same questions as 
asked nationally. Questions asked by 
the NORC cover such areasas occupa- 
tions, incomes, race, age and sex. The 
NORC also asks for opinionson topics 
such as abortion, politics, religion, 
communism and homosexuality. The 
computer also makes it possible to 
compare the results of people with 
different backgrounds. 

Pippin is planning a six hour 
class on learning how to work the 
system for Oct. 9 and 10. The class is 
open for students and faculty and will 
be located in the computer lab on the 
fourth floor of Kyser Hall. 

Pippin invites all students and 
faculty to use the system. He believes 
the information provided by the 
computer system can be helpful to 
more than just sociology majors. Pip- 
pin believes the system can provide 
information useful to politicians, 
businessman and the general public 
who are interested in facts about and 
opinions of people living near them. 



Demon delight 




Vic the Demon, Northwestern's award-winning mascot, 
snuggles with a youngster at last weekend's Family Day. 
Many parents came on campus for the activities that included 
the Northwestern State -North Texas State football game. 



Writer addresses 
apartheid 

See page three 



p Q9 e2 - CURRENT SAUCE September 22, 198? 



Sept 



Idle fountain creates question on campus 



By BERTHA MAXIE 
Staff Writer 

Taking a look around campus, 
one can't help but notice the efforts 
being made to make Northwestern 
more pleasant and appealing. Signs of 
beautification can be seen in the forms 
of fresh paint, building repairs and 
renovations and the planting of 
shrubbery. 

Among the areas slated for 
campus renovation stands a land- 
mark. Located in front of Watson 
Memorial Library, this landmark — a 
fountain — sits idle. 

Designed and built by Dekey- 
ser Ponthie and Boutte, an Alexandria 
architectual/engineering firm, the 
fountain was built and dedicated as a 
memorial to Eugene Watson for 
whom the library was named. 

Watson was hired as an in- 
structor of English in 1934 and re- 
mained at Northwestern until his 
death in 1964. Wastson served as head 
librarian during 1940-1964. In mem- 
ory of his many contributions to 
Northwestern, the library con- 
structed in 1972 was dedicated in his 
name. 

Before designing the fountain, 
Harold Dekeyser consulted with the 
late Author Watson, Eugene's 
brother. Author Watson, who was 
confined to a wheelchair, shared his 
brother's love for the game of chess. 
The two brothers often played for 
hours. 

Policies 
changed 

By WANDA HAMILTON 
Staff Writer 

Although the 1987-88 Student 
Handbook lists specific housing regu- 
lations to be followed by Northwest- 
ern dorm residents, some of the rules 
have been changed since the dorms' 
opening this fall. 

The most controversial rule 
was the open door policy requiring 
the door be kept open when a guest of 
the opposite sex was visiting. The rule 
was changed two weeks into the 
semester by the administration. 

Fred Fulton, director of De- 
partment of Student Life, said the 
open door policy was changed be- 
cause of three reasons: noise, privacy 
and enforcement. Fulton explained 
that dorms were too loud with all the 
doors open and resident assistants 
were having a difficult time enforcing 
the policy. 

Monte Johnson of Sabine Hall 
said, "The open door policy was ri- 
diculous and the visiting hours are too 
short." Johnson was also upset that 
her fiance, who is not a Northwestern 
student, could not get a pass to visit 
her. A second rule states that guests 
must be Northwestern students and 
have current IDs. 

Current visitation hours for 
members of the opposite sex are 6 to 
10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday 
and 6 p.m. to midnight Friday and 
Saturday. 

Some dorm residents believe 
the visitation policy was created for 
children. Gerald Brown of Rapides 
Hall said, "The university needs to 
realize that they are not housing a 
bunch of babies and the open door 
policy should have never been cre- 
ated." 

Residents of Natchitoches and 
Louisiana halls were equally upset 
about the limited visitation hours and 
policy. Many of the dorm residents 
believe since they are living away 
from home they should be able to do 
as they please. However, Rapides 
resident John Berthlot's only com- 
plaint was that the lighting on the 
stairs and in the hallway was terrible. 

Harold Boutte, director of 
Housing Administration, explained 
why the housing policy exists. He said 
visiting hours end at 10:30 p.m. on 
weeknights for a number of reasons. 

The main reason, Boutte said, 
is so students can study for classes 
without being interrupted. The rule 
also allows students to relax in peace. 
For example, in Sabine the visitation 
cut-off time allows residents the pri- 
vacy to wander around in their gowns 
or make-up free without worrying 
about males seeing them. 

Boutte also explained the rea- 
son for not granting non-students 
visiting passes. Boutte said, "In the 
past, people not attending the univer- 
sity would get a pass and then would 
wander off and bother other resi- 
dents. The university has no way of 
tracking down non-students." 

Students who feel the rules are 
unfair should remember, "Regula- 
tions are necessary to insure the pro- 
tection of each student's rights as an 
individual, while at the same time 
insuring the rights of others residing 
in the hall." It's in the handbook. 



'The fountain is set in levels, 
like the men in a chess game," Dekey- 
ser said. Dekeyser selected stone for 
the building material in order to 
symbolize the inner strength that both 
brothers possessed. 

A few years after its construc- 
tion, vandals poured soap into the 
fountain on several occasions. The 
pump had to be turned off and while 
the water stood still in the fountain, 
algae grew into the pipe system. Sev- 
eral years ago problems developed in 
the mechanical workings of the foun- 
tain and it hasn't been turned on since. 
The last time the fountain worked was 
during the mid-70's. 

According to Dekeyser, it is 
possible the fountain could work once 
again. Dekeyser said the fountain's 
pans and pipes would have to be 
cleaned and waterproofed . In order to 
prevent algea from growing in the 
fountain again, the water would have 
to be chlorinated, Dekeyser said. 

Because the fountain has stood 
idle for so long, Dekeyser believes the 
pump would have to be replaced. He 
estimated it would cost about $2,500 
to repair the fountain. 

Dekeyser offered another sug- 
gestion. With the help of 
Northwestern's students, the cost of 
repairs could be reduced to $400 — the 
price of the pump and cleaning equip- 
ment. 

According to Carol Wells, li- 
brarian for Watson Library, the need 




Chess anyone? 

Fountain in front of Watson Library symbolizes stacked chess 
board and players. Constructed in the early 70's, the fountain now 
stands idle. Proposals have been made to renovate the fountain. 



>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOc 




Thursdays 

"5:30-000 



to repair the fountain may not be so 
important due to a proposal offered 
by Lane Marshall, an architect from 
Texas A&M University. Offered to the 
faculty and staff of Northwestern, the 
proposal calls for the library to have 
two main entrances instead of one 
front entrance. This proposal, made at 
a recent meeting, moves the emphasis 
from the front of the library and its 
memorial to the rear of the library. 

According to Loren Lindsey, 
director of physical plant, a proposal 
to fill the pans of the fountain with dirt 



and plant ivy has also been made. The 
proposal to make the fountain a giant 
planter was made by a member of 
Northwestern's staff during a recent 
meeting, Lindsey said. 

Many believe it is not impor- 
tant which proposal is accepted but 
rather that some action is taken. 
Whether the fountain is cleaned and 
flowing with water or growing with 
ivy makes little difference. What mat- 
ters is that the fountain doesn't stand 
idle flowing only with algae and dis- 
carded trash. 



"MSU 



STUDENTS 
[ WITH ID 




SKATE 
DANCE 

TOP 40 /PROGRESSIVE MUSIC 
POOL TABLES 
VIDEO GAMES . 




■at 




Us 



mm 

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooc 



Before you choose a long distance 
service, take a close look. 




You may be thinking about 
choosing one of the newer 
carriers over AT&T in order to 
save money. 

Think again. 

Since January 1987, AT&T's 
rates have dropped more than 
15% for direct-dialed out-of- 
state calls. So they're lower than 
you probably realize. For infor- 
mation on specific rates, you 
can call us at 1 800 222-0300. 

And AT&T offers clear long 
distance connections, operator 
assistance, 24-hour customer 
service, and immediate credit 
for wrong numbers. Plus, you 
can use AT&T to call from 
anywhere to anywhere, all over 
the United States and to over 
250 countries. 

You might be surprised at 
how good a value AT&T really 
is. So before you choose a 
long distance company, pick 
up the phone. 



AT&T 

The right choice. 



*» I . 



r 22, 198/ 

September 22, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



EDITORIAL 



"•—•j Sauce editor eats crow 



IC 



By GREG KENDRICK 
Editor 

Last fall around this time I was 
rather skeptical. The words to the 
wind was that some administrative 
group was planning and plotting a 
campaign. A campaign, as I under- 
stood, that would require massive 
road trips, overtime hours at the ofice 
and some extracurricular participa- 
tion from other departments through- 
out the campus. The plans where 
painstakingly laid, the money was 
plotted, nails where chewed on and 
then the great Northwestern high 
school recruiting drive began. 

They had a rookie at the helm. 
Rumor had it that this rookie, Georgia 
Beasely, had sharp ideas, an open 
personality and inexhaustible energy. 
The grapevine grumbled a little, sat 
back and watched. 



Soon strange events started 
occurring around campus. Profes- 
sional photographers sprouted up 
overnight trying to capture this newly 
formed and ascending school spirit 
that lurked in the shadows of the 
campus. Then the requisition of 
school vehicles started to flood the 
motor pool with destinations set for 
tOOOOOOti high schools as close as next door or 
on the other side of Louisiana. 



On many occasions, armadas 
of bright yellow buses docked in the 
dormitory parking lots, brandishing 



the flags of various high schools. 
Northwestern was being invaded by 
eager and well informed students. 
"Wait a minute," I grumbled. "High 
school students? Coming here? Who 

is responsible for this crazy, futile 
idea?" I was convinced that the 
Admissions Office had flipped their 
wig. 

I would walk into my adviser's 
office, Tommy Whitehead, and ob- 
serve him trying to achieve three func- 
tions at once. Calling up advertising 
firms to check on the status of North- 
western recruitment paraphernalia, 
or checking with the TV center to 
confirm that the recruiting slide show 
was set up for yet another potential 
student viewing audience, or some- 
times trying to contact Mrs. Beasely to 
inform her that her plans had been put 
into affect. 

Tommy finally learned that 
trying to reach Mrs. Beasely and her 
staff at the Admissions Office was a 
futile attempt. They were always too 
busy. Too busy giving tours of the 
campus for potential students that 
showed just a sliver of interest in en- 
rolling in Northwestern. Too busy 
coordinating presentations, call-a- 
thons and brochures that may bring in 
even more student blood. Too busy 
making road trips to the end of the 
earth, searching for the best and 
brightest students that could be intro- 
duced to the gates of Northwestern. 

Tommy didn't have to call 



Mrs. 668561/5 office, she, or one of her 
workers, were bound to show up at 
his office every five minutes, checking 
up on his contributions to the recruit- 
ing drive or introducing more poten- 
tial students to the journalism depart- 
ment. The woman and her staff were 
social dynamos, zipping from one 
part of the campus to the other, giving 
tours, setting up presentations and 
always showing a positive attitude 
that naturally rubbed on everybody 
that was near. Everybody, that is, 
except me. 

I was the ultimate pessimist. 
"These people are crazy!" I said to 
myself and quite a few other people. 
"Do they really think that this recruit- 
ing drive is going to work?" I was 
positive that the Department of 
Admissions was wasting time, effort, 
money and valuable sleep. 

Well ladies and gentlemen, the 
1987 fall enrollment stats are out and I 
will now admit to you that I eat crow! 

Actually I knew that those sta- 
tistics were going to be incredible. I 
could tell by the electricity and enthu- 
siasm present on this campus that 
enrollment and attitude toward 
Northwestern has skyrocketed. 

Most of the credit goes to that 
former-rookie Director of Admissions 
and Recruiting and the staff that work 
with her. They have proven, underthe 
line of fire, that they can deliver to 
Northwestern the best and the bright- 
est students Louisiana has to offer. 

Mrs. Beasely and the rest of the 
Admissions staff, I salute you. 



Fi re Alarm Fun 




r 



Northwestern f s social capital 
questioned by freshman writer 



...o^coop&e woo'rg 

eNTi'TL£D TO A SECOND 
OPiNiONP. ...BUT NOT 
U)HeN ,T dDMeS -TO M V 

> iX 





Un.vrial Pre« Synd<c«f 



By CHRISTI RHYMES 
Staff Writer 

When I first came to North- 
western I was told of the outstanding 
improvement of the food service. So 
like the trooper that I am, I hiked from 
Boozman Hall to Iberville to try it out. 

I bounced into Iberville and 
gave the lady my card . I gave the place 
a once over and thought to myself, 
"Look at all those happy campers. A 
filled cafeteria — good sign." 

They all seemed to have the 
same "Well, we have to eat" look on 
their faces. A few girls winced as they 
chewed. I concluded they were proba- 
bly from wealthy families and weren't 
used to cafeteria life. 



I walked in to find there was a 
salad bar (sort of) and two separate 
food lines. I glanced up at the menu 
board reading "sizzles" at the top. I 
thought to myself, "What in the hell 
are sizzles?" The other board read 
"chicken" and a long list of goop that 
went with it. That sounded more 
identifiable to me so I ate in that line 
along with a large group of tree- 
shaped people called football players. 
Football players, to the best of my 
knowledge, will eat anything and go 
back not only for seconds but even 
thirds. 

I sat down at the table with my 
food and began to eat. I nowsawgood 
reason in all the sad, disappointed 
looks. I also determined that all the 
girls who winced were not wealthy. 



Suddenly the word "diet" was inspir- 
ing. 

A few days later I discovered 
the reason students waste time at Iber- 
ville. I overheard two girls saying 
happily, "We're going to eat at Iber- 
ville." I cringed and promptly asked, 
"Why?" I was quite impressed with 
the answer, "Because the football 
team eats between 11:30 and 12:00." 
Good answer. 

So now — you walk into Iber-' 
ville and decide whether you'd prefer 
cold bad food, hot bad food, or (let's 
not leave out) Mexican OK food . Then 
you sit down and smile and wave 
between bites. 

What a scene: Iberville, the 
social capital of Northwestern. 



Officer offers reasons 



Dear Editor, 

Due to recent and unexpected 
changes in the development of my 
fledgling writing career, I have de- 
cided not to seek reappointment to the 
position of SGA Parliamentarian. In- 
stead, I plan to revise my first and 
begin work on my second novel. 

That was the message I deliv- 
-*-ered to SGA President Johnny Cox 
yesterday. I wanted to clarify that I am 
not resigning. According to my job 
description, my term in office has 
simply expired, as of last night. 

There are just too many incon- 
sistencies within the organization, 
inconsistencies that are counterpro- 



ductive to eveything I try to or know 
how to do. Correcting those problems 
is beyond the duties of a parliamen- 
tarian and beyond the capacities of 
one human body. 

I am one of those people who in 
order to stay sane, era ves doing some- 
thing that moves forward with direc- 
tion. Not that the SGA will never 
move forward again,but it needs to sit 
still right now, and take time to con- 
sider and correct its difficulties. I 
simply see more vitality in trying to 
get a few more publications under my 
name. 

Sincerely, 
Gynger Ingram 



Writer addresses apartheid, student support requested 



Dear Editor, 

Apartheid n [Afrik., apart- 
ness] strict racial segregation as prac- 
ticed in South Africa. Webster's New 
World Dictionary, pocket edition, 
World Publishing Co., 1975. 

Fine, we know a definition for 
apartheid now, but what is it really? 
Apartheid is daily suffering, pain, the 
insecurity of starvation, the horror of 
widespread unemployment and the 
murder of a proud people who live 
under the Dark Ages' system of an 
oppressive government in South Af- 
rica. 

The anti-apartheid movement 
is not a radical or a racial issue. Op- 
posing apartheid is a matter of love, a 



moral impcrativeand an act of respect 
for the dignity of mankind. 

On Sunday evening, Sept. 20, 
1987, HBO premiered their produc- 
tion of "Mandella." Nelson Mandella 
is a leader in the African National 
Congress (ANC) and has been in a 
South African prison since 1964. 
Mandella was jailed as a result of his 
efforts to promote equal opportuni- 
ties for the rightful citizens of South 
Africa. It will air again for the rest of 
September and is a must-see program 
for any person who is concerned with 
the health of our world. 

In South Africa nearly 70 per- 
cent of Africans in urban areas earn 
less than the figure considered by 



South African economists to be neces- 
sary for survival. The South African 
government may legally detain any- 
one for an indefinite period on any 
suspicion. Security officers enforce 
and pass laws with such diligence that 
one adult in four is arrested annually 
for some kind of violation. Whites are 
paid as much as eight times as much 
as blacks for the same work and white 
South Africans enjoy one of the 
world's highest standards of living. 

We, as students, the future 
leaders of an imperfect world, love 
freedom, democracy, and our now 
200-year-old Constitution. We should 
be aligning ourselves with the people 
of South Africa who are seeking the 



same rights that we hold sacred. 

I guess we could wait for the 
communists to help the South Afri- 
cans and then spend millions of dol- 
lars annually to fight the South Afri- 
can version of Latin America's 
Sandinistas and rebel forces in El 
Salvador. Will we ever learn? Ameri- 
can policies seem to be similar to clos- 
ing the proverbial door after the horse 
is gone. 

I believe that we, as students 
do learn from our mistakes. How can 
we help? The days of college sit-ins 
and protests seem to be gone. But 
today over 114 universities and col- 
leges in America alone have shed 
South African related stocks from 



their endowments. Divestment 
movements are now a nationwide 
effort. Workers at AT&T, Levi Strauss, 
Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance 
Co., and Lotus Development began 
divesting their corporate pension 
plans last year. 

Isn't it time that we stood for 
something, taking action where our 
conscience and morality demand it? 
Have you, as an individual, united 
with others, ever wanted to have 
some say in world affairs? Let's talk 
about it! Bring a friend to the sidewalk 
cafe, in front of the Student Union 
Thursday at 11 a.m. Maybe we can 
help make a difference. 

Chris Wilcox 
Senior/Business Finance 



CURRENT SAUCE 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 



USA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 



KIRK COPELAND 

Sports Editor 



MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
SARAH BULLER 
WANDA HAMILTON 
BERTHA MAXIE 
DAN MEDLIN 
CHRISTI RHYMES 
SONY A R1GAUD 
MICHELLE WEEGO 
Staff Writers 



ALLEN EVANS 

Advertising Manager 



EDD LEE 

Circulation/Distribution 



CHARLOTTE RUSH 

Photo Ediitor 



TEDRIS SMITH 
WILLIAM FRANCO 

Photographers 



ROBERT BROWN 

Layout Editor 



TOM WHITEHEAD 

Adviser 



CURRENT QUOTES 



If you had a problem or a suggestion, would you take it to the SGA? 








J 



Sean Mayfield 

1-1, Broadcasting 
Leesville 

"No, It seems for a government 
body they are not accomplishing that 
much. They area formality. Theyserveno 
purpose." 



Jennifer Gombach 
4-4, Journalism 
Indianapolis,IN 

"No, I'm a commuter, and I don't 
feel like the commuters are represented in 
the SGA." 



Evan Taylor 

1-1, Scholars College 
Natchitoches 

"Yes, they are on our level of 
understanding. I think they can handle 
the student's problem." 



s u*an Smith 
1-1, Accounting 
Delhi 

"Yes, because they are here to help 
us. 1 think they are able to help us." 



Kent Mastainich 
4-1, Bus. Admin. 
Li Place 

"No, they have never given me 
proof that they would do anything about 
student problems." 



The Current Sauce is 
published weekly during the fall 
and spring semesters by the stu- 
dents of Northwestern State Uni- 
versity of Louisiana. It is not asso- 
ciated with any of the 
University's departments and is 
financed independently 

The Current Sauce is 
based in the Office of Student 
Publications located in Kyser 
Hall. The office of the editorial 
staff is 225H. telephone (318) 
357-5456 The adviser's office is 
103 Kyser Hall, telephone 357- 
5213 

The mailing address for 
the Current Sauce is P.O. Box 
5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 
71497. 

All correspondence, in- 
cluding letters to the editor is 
welcome Material submitted 
for consideration must be 
mailed to above address or 
brought to the office 

Th.3 deadline for all ad- 
vertising and copy is Friday by 3 
p.m. Inclusion of any and all 
material is left to the discretion of 
the editor. 

Letters to the editor 
should be typed (double- 
spaced) signed, and should in- 
clude a telephone number 
where the writer can be 
reached. No anonymous letters 
will be printed. 

Current sauce subscrip- 
tion rates are S 1 1 per academic 
year (27 issues) or $6 per 
semester (14 issues). The paper is 
entered as second-class mail at 
Natchitoches, LA, The USPS 
number is 140-660 



Page 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



September 22, 1987 



Lin f s view 
of America 

By MICHELLE WEEGO 
Staff Writer 

Meet Yuchiu Lin, or "Jo" as she 
prefers to be known in America. Jo is 
a 28-year-old sophomore from Taipei, 
Taiwan, majoring in accounting. 

Jo got her first glimpse of 
America in 1981 while on a four- 
month visit to Dallas with her sister. 

"Everything is so big. The 
houses are a lot farther apart and 
everyone has a back and front yard. 
Unless you're a farmer, you don't 
have grass in Taiwan," Lin said. 
"Also, they say in Taiwan that 
America's moon is bigger. I didn't 
believe that until I came here. It does 
appear larger. Maybe it's the way the 
earth revolves." 

Jo went home to Taiwan in 
1981 only to return in 1986. Jo re- 
turned to the United States at the re- 
quest of her brother who owns a busi- 
ness in Dallas. Jo's brother asked her 
to learn English so she could begin 
working at his export business: the 
Zuelong Embroidery Company. 

"It's still difficult. Sometimes 
the teachers talk too fast for me, but 
I'm learning," Lin said of learning 
English. 

Jo, who earned a secretarial 
degreefrom Minchuan College in Tai- 
wan, first attended Wichita State in 
Kansas upon her arrival to the United 
States. However, she found the cli- 
mate too cold and decided to return to 
Texas. While in Texas she met Marion 
Nesom, English instructor and direc- 
tor of the American Language Orien- 
tation Center at Northwestern. After 
visiting with Nesom, Jo decided to try 
out Northwestern State University. 

In comparison to Jo's home, 
Natchitoches seems very small. Al- 
though the island of Taiwan, located 
beween Japan and the Philippines, 
may be considered tiny (only 250 
miles from north end to south end) it 
has several large cities along the coast. 
Jo's home, Taipei, is the capital of 
Taiwan and contains about two mil- 
lion people. 

"With so many cars in Taiwan 
there is a lot of traffic. There is a big 
difference in how people drive. In 
America, everyone mainly sticks to 
the law. In Taiwan we drive wherever 
and however we want," Lin said. 

'Taxis are different too. Here 
they charge by both time and mileage. 
In Taiwan they charge by just mileage 
so the cabs drive extremely fast. A 
normal 15 minute ride to the movies 
usually takes five minutes. 

"Dating in America is strange 
too," Lin said. "Here you can date one 
guy one week and someone else the 
next night. In Taiwan we date just one 
person." 

One of the largest differences 
between American and Taiwan cul- 
tures is the cuisine. Although a few 
meals may be similar, Jo misses the 
large variety of vegetables grown on 
Taiwan farms. "We also tend to eat 
more fruit for dessert rather than 
sweets," she said. 

Jo compared the physical char- 
acteristics of her people and Ameri- 



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Host group formed 



Lin 

cans to rice: "American rice tends to 
be tall and thin and ours is short and 
fat," Lin said. 

One strange transition for Jo is 
the beverages accompanying Ameri- 
can meals. "We drink the bowl of hot 
soup always served with the dish and 
not a coke with ice. I'm used to it now 
though." 

All in all, American life to a 
visitor can be extremely confusing. Jo 
related her most unusual experience: 
"The first time I saw a sign that said 
'Garage Sale' I wondered why they 
were selling just the garage and not 
the whole house. The people with me 
just kept laughing." 



By SARAH BULLER 
Staff Writer 

In keeping with their promise, 
the administration has selected a 
group of students at Northwestern to 
help represent the university. 

'These students represent the 
university and the president's office 
at designated events. They also assist 
in recruiting and admissions," Fred 
Fulton,diretorof Student Life Depart- 
ment, said. 

Fulton is speaking about 
Northwestern's student hosts and 
hostesses. Presently, 25 students are 
involved in the program. 

'These particular ones were 
chosen based on reccomendations by 
the Department of Student Lifeand by 
staff administration," Fulton said of 
. their selection. 

Ranging from freshman to 
senior, the hosts and hostesses are not 
considered an organization and are 
funded by Northwestern State 
Universtiy. The students are asked to 
attend functions on a volunteer basis 
and recieve no benefits other than 
recognition from staff and students. 

Developed last spring, the 
group has represented both the 
Admissions and Recruiting Depart- 
ment and the Department of Student 
Life at several functions. Functions 



include Scholars' Weekend where the 
students gave tours and information 
to visitors and the reception for new 
faculty at which they acted as a greet- 
ing committee. 

The hosts are provided with 
gray blazers with a large "N" sewn on 
the front. For their uniforms, host- 
esses wear purple dresses. 

"We've only met once this 
semester but we're on call to serve at 
university functions," said hostess 
Tina Dutile, sophomore elementary 
education major. Dutile said students 
selected for the group serve the uni- 
versity on a rotating basis. 

"We're supposed to help greet 
people and act as a pubic relations 
arm for the university," Dutile said. 

The Northwestern hosts and 
hostesses are supervised by Marilyn 
Haley, recruiter/counselor. In addi- 
tion to recruiting for Northwestern, 
Haley also acts as hostess and helps 
plan and oversee university events. 
The student hosts and hostesses are 
part of Haley's force. 

The student host and hostess 
group puts in time to help welcome 
visitors and new students to North- 
western when staff is not available. It 
is a group that not many people know 
about but that should be admired and 
recognized for their dedication and 
hard work, Fulton said. 

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Den 

By KIRK O 

Sports Edil 

Afte 
at the han 
Northwest 
feels to take 
dance and 
one else. 

Key 
Demons' : 
which can 
mixed in w 
officiating 1 
a crowd of 
Whe 
71 -yard fiel 
fhapman ^ 
'scoreboard 
Ithe previo 
pons fell 
jMean Gree 
NSU 
like a team 
J loutset, driv 
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giving waj 
piggest thoi 
ugly head < 
30-yard att( 
if he Demon 
the night F 
field goals £ 
sion. 

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delved into 
pmes durin 
fcoming mi 
quarter wh( 
Itookthedet 
W\ Edward; 
b yards. L 
irtons, Edv 
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stage for thi 
Ontl 

NSU 

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September 22, 1987 . CURRENT SAUCE Page 5 



r22, 1987 



Demons fall prey to mistakes, Eagles by 15-13 count 



p.m. 

IVTCS) 

M 

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tours: 

X) Mon.-Fri. 
00 Saturdays 



By KIRK COPELAND 

Sports Editor 

After last Saturday's 15-13 loss 
at the hands of North Texas State, 
Northwestern's Demons know how it 
Ifeels to take the best-looking girl to the 
dance and have her leave with some- 
one else. 

Key mistakes, such as the 
Demons' five turnovers, most of 
which came in crucial situations, 
mixed in with a few examples of bad 
officiating led to NSU's demise before 
a crowd of 11,100 in Turpin Stadium. 

When all was said and done, a 
52-yard field goal by the Eagles' Keith 
jChapman with 28 seconds left on the 
scoreboard clock was the difference as 
the previously fourth-ranked De- 
mons fell in a heartbreaker to the 
ean Green. 

NSU's Men in Purple looked 
ike a team of destiny at the game's 
utset, driving from its own 32 down 
to the NTSU 13 before stalling and 
giving way to Keith Hodnett. The 
biggest thorn in NSU's side reared its 
bgly head at that point as Hodnett's 
BO-yard attempt went wide right and 
he Demons were turned away. On 
he night Hodnett would miss three 
leld goals and an extra point conver- 
sion. 

Head Coach Sam Goodwin 
Jelved into his bag of tricks several 
imes during the game, the first time 
coming midway through the first 
quarter when punter Mark Contreras 
|ook the deep snapand threw a pass to 
'Al Edwards on fourth down netting 
13 yards. Unfortunately for the De- 
mons, Edwards fumbled the ball 
away as he was tackled, setting the 
stage for things to come. 

On the first play of the second 



quarter the Fiery Ones again resorted 
to slight of hand. On fourth-and-four 
from midfield, the Demons left their 
offensive team on the field before 
rushing the punting team out and 
quick-kicking the ball. Not only did 
the ball roll dead on the NTSU one 
yard line but also, in theconf usion, the 
Eagles were caught with too many 
men on the field and the Demon drive 
was kept alive. It did not matter, 
though, as the penetration died at the 
NTSU 23 and Hodnett's 40-yard boot 
was blocked. 

The Mean Green broke on top 
soon after when, following a North 
Texas State punt that was downed 
inside the Demon five, Eagle Roderick 
Manning collared Floyd Turner in the 
end zone on an end around play. The 
Eagles followed with a Chapman field 
goal from 41 yards out in the last 
minute of the half after returner Kevin 
Lewis fumbled on his own 19 yard 
line. 

NTSU came storming out of 
the locker rooms after the half driving 
64 yards, culminating with Wes 
Montgomery snagging a four-yard 
pass from Scott Davis in the end zone. 
Chapman's PAT left the score at 12-0. 

From that point the Demon 
"D" stood up and held North Texas 
State to minus five yards in total of- 
fense until their final drive. 

NSU's offense got on track in 
the fourth quarter driving the ball 78 
yards in eight plays, finally scoring on 
another crafty play. On fourth down 
from the NTSU four, Rusty Slack took 
the snap and pitched to Tracy Palmer 
around right end. Palmer turned and 
threw back to Slack who rumbled into 
the end zone. Hodnett again had his 
kick blocked, making the score 12-6 in 
favor of the Mean Green. 



Again the Demon defense held 
and NSU got the ball back on downs. 
From the NTSU 47, Slack hit tight end 
Orlan Lockhart on a post pattern and 
Lockhart turned it into a touchdown, 
breaking three tackles on the way to 
the goalline. Then, miracle of mir- 
acles, Hodnett hit the PAT, giving the 
Demons a 13-12 advantage. 

On the ensuing kickoff, North 
Texas State fumbled and Northwest- 
ern took over on the Eagle 31. Five 
plays gained five yards before 
Hodnett's 43-yard attempt hooked 
left. 

The Eagles lost fifteen yards on 
their next possession and NSU set up 
shop on its own 46 with 5:32 left in the 
game. Another costly mistake by the 
Demons followed as Slack ran into 
fullback John Stephens and fumbled 
with the Eagles' Tom Middaugh re- 
covering. 

Four plays later, some poor 
officiating came into play. North 
Texas State quarterback Scott Davis 
called timeout on fourth and nine 
from the NSU 41. The Eagles came 
back on the field, lined up, and Davis 
called another timeout. The officials 
disallowed the second but restarted' 
the 25-second clock, which had run 
down to twelve seconds. Davis hit 
Marcus Camper for a sixteen-yard 
completion that set up the winner, 
Chapman's 22 yarder. 

"Anytime you feel you're the 
best team and you lose, it hurts," said 
Goodwin. " Maybe I'm not giving 
North Texas State enough credit, but 
take away our mistakes, and we 
would have won the ball game." 

The Demons, who last week 
had the honor of a number four rank- 
ing by the NCAA, dropped out of the 
Top Ten because of the loss. Current 



NSU Booster club to hold pro football fund-raiser 



It's a good way to support 
Demon Athletics and at the same time 
pick up some pocket money for your- 
self. 

"It" is the NSU Booster Club's 
Pro Football Fundraiser Card, which 
hopes to increase on it's profit of 
$4,600 from a year ago. The card was 
introduced last year and was highly 
popular with NSU supporters both in 
Natchitoches and out of town. 

'Pro football and a chance to 
win a little money - those two selling 
points are popular with a good num- 
ber of people. The Pro Football Card 
offers both," said Greg Burke, Execu- 
tive Director of the Booster Club. 

In plain, simple English, here is 
how the card works: 

1) The program runs for the 

final 10 weeks of the NFL season, 
beginning on October 25. All 28 teams 
are involved and each is coded by 
letter. 

2) As was stated above, the 



computer assigns you three teams (by 
code letter) each week. 

3) It does not matter if your 
teams win or lose. In fact, two of your 
teams may play each other. The key is 
how many (or few) points your 
three team score when added to- 
gether. The top seven high combina- 
tions and the low two combos are win- 



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TOTAL WEEKLY PRIZES. 1 500 



can- 





Yon should have seen J. T. run. Even with the 
physical limitations he had to overcome, there teas a 
special grace to his stride. But it was his face that 
captivated the observer. Such undaunted detennina 
don. such unbridled spirit was gripping, inspiring. 

J.T. didn 't win first place. Not even second. Fact 
is. he just avoided being last by about two steps. His 
victory was from within: through sheer will and 
effort, he transcended the disadvantages that fate 
and nature had imposed on him. He was even inch 
a winner. 



The Louisiana Investor-Owned Electric Companies enthusiastically support 
the Special Olympics program. The courage shown by the competitors in over- 
coming personal adversities serves as a model for us all in today 's difficult 
economic times. These plucky athletes convincingly demonstrate how to draw 
on other strengths when one facility is diminished. 

The LIOEC applauds the contenders, the staff, and the volunteers of the 
Louisiana Special Olympics for setting an example of triumph against the odds. 

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rankings list NSU as number eleven in 
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from number thirteen to seventh. 



up 



John Stephens, who entered 
the game just three yards shy of Sid- 
ney Thornton as the second leading 
rusher in NSU history, picked up the 
necessary yardage on his first run 
from scrimmage, a four-yard scamper 
around right end. 

NSU now enjoys an off week 
before they take on third-ranked 
Northeastern Louisiana for Home- 
coming. The Demons take on the Indi- 
ans at 2 p.m., Oct. 3 inTurpin Stadium. 



4) The cost of the card is $10 
and you are in for ten weeks (that is $1 
per week). During that ten week pe- 
riod, you have 90 chances to win back 
your money. 

For more information or to 
purchase cards, see Greg Burke at the 
Athletic Field house or call 357-5251. 



Johnny's Restaurant 

Located in the El Camino across from NSU 
Open from 6 a.m. - 10 p.m., 7 days a M eek 

Complete menu and short orders, great burgers 
Lunches served daily except Saturday 
Breakfast served anytime 
Takeout orders welcome 

NSU students, faculty, and staff welcome' 
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Page 6 



CURRENT SAUCE 



September 22, 1987 




Library hours 

Watson Library service hours 
for the 1987 fall semester are from 8 
a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday; 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday; 10 
a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; and 2 to 10 
p.m. Sunday. 

The media/serials division 
closes at 10 p.m. weeknights. The 
Gammie Henry Research Center is 
open 8 a.m . to 5 p.m. Monday through 
Friday. 

Due to the increase in aca- 
demic emphasis on campus, students 
are urged to locate and secure study 
and research materials well in ad- 
vance of assignment deadlines. 

Both students and faculty are 
reminded that NSU IDs are necessary 
to check out library materials. 

Academic services 

Academic Support Services 
Program, located in room 104 Kyser 
Hall, offers tutoring in a variety of 
subjects. Tutoring areas include psy- 
chology, sociolgoy, science, business, 
biology, Spanish, education, zoology, 
chemistry and physics. 

In addition to tutoring, Sup- 
port Services also offers support 
groups, peer counseling, role models 
and assistance in financial aid. 

Students interested in the tu- 
toring service should go by or call the 
Academic Support Services at 357- 
5901. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. Monday through Friday. 

Organization cards 

All campus organizations 
must renew their organizational 
cards in room 214 of the Student 
Union this week. In addition to re- 
newing the card, each group must 
submit a copy of their current 
constitution. Groups failing to renew 
the organizational card will be consid- 
ered inactive. 

Phi Alpha Theta 

The Northwestern chapter of 
Phi Alpha Theta will hold an 11 a.m. 
brunch Thursday in room 201 of Wil- 
liamson Hall. The purpose of the 
brunch is to greet all history majors 
and minors on campus. Phi Alpha 
Theta, the history honor society, of- 
fers students the opportunity to get 
acquainted with others in their field. 
The history faculty will be attending 
the brunch. For more information on 
the brunch and on Phi Alpha Theta go 
by room 301 Kyser Hall. 

Resume workshop 

The Center for Career Plan- 
ning and Placement will hold a free 
resume writing workshop 3 p.m. 
Wednesday in room 305 of the Stu- 
dent Union. The hour-long session 
will teach basic resume and letter 
writing techniques. Danny Seymour, 
director of career planning and place- 
ment, said the resume is a written 
representation of an individual and 
will be seen by many people. "The 
resume must be effective to land an 
interview and ultimately a position in 
today's job market," Seymour said. 

BACCHUS 

The BACCHUS organization 
(Boost Alcohol Consciousness Con- 
cerning the Health of University Stu- 
dents) has an office located in room 
311 of the Student Union. Office hours 
are 2 to 4 p.m. Monday, Wednesday 
and Friday and 11 a.m. to noon on 
Tuesday and Thursday. Anyone re- 
questing information about BAC- 
CHUS, alcohol or drug use and abuse 
should go by or call BACCHUS at 357- 
5287. 

BACCHUS is a national non- 
profit, student-oriented program 
which deals with alcohol and drug 
abuse on college campuses. Students 
wishing to join BACCHUS should 
pick up and complete an application 
for membership. Applications are 
available in room 311 of the Student 
Union or from the Infirmary. 

Artist series 

Northwestern's Artist Series 
has announced its five attractions for 
the 1987-88 season. Attractions in- 
clude Tennessee Williams' "The Glass 
Menagerie," the Shreveport Sym- 
phony Chamber Orchestra, the New 
Orleans Philharmonic, the Vienna 
Choir Boys and the Joffrey II Dancers. 

The season opens Oct. 15 with 
the Missouri Repertory Company 
presenting Williams' "The Glass 
Menagerie" at 7 p.m. in A. A. Freder- 
icks Fine Arts Auditorium. "One of 
Williams' most touching, memorable 
plays, this classic is brought to life by 
America's premiere theatrical touring 
company," Tony Smith, Artist Series 
chairman, said. 

Also appearing this fall is the 
Shreveport Symphony Chamber Or- 
chestra. The symphony will perform 
Nov. 2 in A. A. Fredericks Recital Hall. 
The remaining three acts are sched- 
uled for spring performances. 

Tickets for the season are now 
on sale. Northwestern students are 
admitted free to the series with a valid 



Intramurals 

The Department of Leisure 
Activities and Recreational Sports 
held a beach day Sept. 12. The beach 
day was termed a success with more 
than 100 students attending. 

Upcoming intramural events 
include flag football team captains' 
meeting on Wednesday and flag foot- 
ball jamboree on Thursday. Deadline 
for entering flag football is Wednes- 
day. For more information on upcom- 
ing events and registration contact the 
intramural office at 357-5461. 



TEKE 

Tau Kappa Epsilon announces 
its 1987 fall pledge class. Pledges are: 
Richard Amison, Michael Autry, 
Mark Cruz, Tony Duplechien, Shane 
Dupuy, David Ellis, Russell Graef, 
Kirk Green, Carl Hanchey, Brad 
Hicks, Ladd Jackson, Michael 
Jackson, Chris Lee, Jerry Mickey, John 
Miguez, Riley Milner, Bernard 
Pacheco, Trey Rhodes, Lenny Roach, 
Gregg Scott, Steve Smith, Scott 
Warner, Blake Wiggins, Keith Wil- 
liams and Kevin Freeman. 

TEKE was awarded the 
Domino's Spirit Trophy during the 
fourth quarter of the Northwestern v. 
North Texas State game Saturday. 

Library workshops 

The Academic Support Serv- 
ices Program and Watson Library will 
present two workshops on "Using the 
Library." The purpose of the work- 
shops is to introduce students to the 
use of resources and exercises that aid 
in the achievement of successful col- 
lege projects. Workshops will be held 
7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday in room 
111, Reserve Room, of Watson Li- 
brary. 



Cataloging division 
to receive computer 



This article is the second 
in a series on the E.P. Watson 
Library. 

The existence and work of a 
library's catalog division is a mystery 
to many people. Library users often 
take advantage of the catalog system 
but have no understanding of how the 
system is actually organized and 
operated. 

Although different libraries 
have different cataloging systems, 
most systems involve three processes. 
The first is descriptive cataloging 
which gives a brief description about 
the material. Subject cataloging is 
another technique which identifies 
the content of the material. Classifica- 
tion cataloging gives information to 
where the item is located in the li- 
brary. 

The most familiar form of cata- 
loging is the card catalog. The card 
catalog is usually filed as a straight 
dictionary catalog or split into some 
combination of author, title and sub- 
ject. 

The card catalog is usually 
accompanied by a classification ori- 
ented catalog record data base called 
the shelf list. Both of these files are 
basically descriptive catalog records 
with specailized information ap- 
pended to them. The card catalog is 
arranged alphabetically with an ac- 
cess point typed above it. 

Northwestern's Watson Li- 
brary currently operates under the 
card catalog system. However, future 



plans for the library and its catalog 
system include a public access online 
catalog. A public access online catalog 
is a computer operated catalog sys- 
tem. This system will ease individual 
search for materials and will eliminate 
the need for a bulky card catalog. 

A public access online catalog 
has been approved for Watson Li- 
brary. The library staff and admini- 
stration are currently examining vari- 
ous types of computer systems. Hard- 
ware, software and interfacing equip- 
ment are being reviewed by the staff. 

Northwestern's head of the 
catalog division is Leroy Landon, who 
will complete 10 years of service this 
fall. Landon holds a bachelor' s degree 
in education, a master's degree 
plus 30 hours in education, and a 
master's in library science from LSU. 
Prior to working at Northwestern, 
Landon was a cataloger for Northeast 
University's Sandel Library. 

Landon is assisted by two 
civil service employees with the rank 
of library paraprofessional II, Juanita 
Bundrick and Linda Durr. Bundrick 
will retire from library work in Octo- 
ber after 18 years of service at North- 
western. 

In addition to creating catalog 
records, many catalog divisions are 
also responsible for preparing materi- 
als for the shelf. Preparing items for 
shelfing includes attaching lables, 
pockets, property stamps and bar- 
codes. Catalog divisions also estab- 
lish, maintain and revise the catalog 
record data base. 



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Student Activities Board slates Homecoming activities 



MER,R.PH 



"The Student Activities Board 
s a lot of activities planned for 
I Homecoming Week this year, " said 
nya Rigaud, SAB's Special Events 
irman. The Special Events Chair- 
ian is in charge of coordinating ac- 
Svities for Homecoming Week, State 
fair Week, and Spring Ring. 
According to Rigaud, Homecoming 
Jestivities started Monday night with 
^e showing of the movie, "Nothing in 
Common" at 7:30 p.m. in Union Sta- 
n. 

Members of the Homecoming 
urt attended a reception at the 
klumni House Monday from 5:30 
s.m. to 7:30 p.m. All faculty and staff 
nembers were invited to attend, ac- 
ording to Melissa Smith, Homecom- 
ig Chairman for the Student Govern- 
ment Association. Smith is in charge 



of the maintaining of all court activi- 
ties. 

At 8:00 p.m. Tuesday the SAB 
is sponsoring "Homecoming Hon- 
eys" in the Student Union Ballroom. 
"Homecoming Honeys' is a beauty 
pageant for men. I really hope that a 
lot of guys sign up for the pageant. It 
should be a lot of fun, " said Rigaud. 
The participants in the pageant will be 
required to dress like women by 
wearing makeup and dresses. Ac- 
cording to Rigaud and Melissa Smith, 
the Homecoming Court will serve as 
judges for the pageant. 

Rigaud also said that the $50.00 
prize for 1st place may urge some 
contestants to sign up. 

Wednesday students can show 
their school spirit for "Purple and 
White Day" by wearing Northwest- 



ern colors. There will be a pep rally 
Wednesday night at the Student Body 
night club at 9:30 p.m. Johnny An- 
toon, owner and operator of the club, 
said there will be several drink spe- 
cials available. 

According to Melissa Smith, 
each member of the Homecoming 
Court will receive a free dinner at 
Shamrock's located along the Strip on 
Thursday at 6:00 p.m. 

A comedian, Mark Pitta, will 
also be appearing in Union Station at 
7:00 p.m. on Thursday. "Mark Pitta is 
a very good comedian," said Kim- 
berly Antee, president of the SAB. 

"On Friday at 3:30 p.m. the 
members of the SAB will host a recep- 
tion with the Northwestern faculty, 
staff, and administration," said Ra- 
chel Heider, director of Public Rela- 



tions and Advertising for the SAB. 

Melody Smith, SGA Home- 
coming Committee member, has set a 
Homecoming parade for 6:30 p.m. 
Friday. "I feel really confident that we 
will have a lot of participation in the 
parade. 1 want to encourage each 
organization on campus to get in- 
volved with the parade and show 
their spirit," Melody Smith said. 

According to Melody Smith, 
the parade will start at Iberville Din- 
ing Hall and end behind the Student 
Union. 

Rigaud said that there will be a 
Homecoming pep rally in front of 
Union Station immediately following 
the parade. The Homecoming Court 
will be presented to the student body. 
At 7:30 p.m. Tim Settimi, a comedian 
who was named as the Collegiate 



Entertainer of the Year, will appear in 
Union Station on Friday. "We feel that 
having the parade and pep rally right 
before Tim Settimi's act will encour- 
age more students to come on over to 
Union Station right after the rally is 
over," Rigaud said. 

Saturday at 2:00 p.m. the 
Demons will take on the NLU Indians 
for Northwestern's 103rd annual 
Homecoming game. The Homecom- 
ing Court will be presented at 
halftime. 

The queen of the 1987 
Nortwestern Homecoming Court is 
Melissa Canales, a junior majoring in 
Math Education from Leesville. The 
members of her court include Kim- 
berly Antee, a senior majoring in 
Business Administration from Ingle- 
wood, California ; Dayna Dooley, a 



sophomore majoring in Business/ 
Finance from Baton Rouge ; Beth Eitel, 
a junior majoring in Physical Educa- 
tion from Natchitoches ; Karen 
Guidry, a junior majoring in Math 
Education from Larose ; Laurie 
LeBlanc, a sophomore majoring in 
Journalism from Paincourtville ; Cyn- 
thia Ross, a junior majoring in Child 
Psychology from Anacoco ; Patti 
Smiley, a junior majoring in Nursing 
from Pelham, Alabama ; and Kim- 
berly Wilson, a junior majoring in 
Physical Education from Baton 
Rouge. 

"I think that the students of 
Northwestern need to come out and 
support their school this week at each 
of these events. We've got a really 
great team and we need to show them 
our school spirit," Rigaud said. 



IBM offers student discount 



y MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
taff Writer 

IBM microcomputers are now 
vailable to Northwestern students 
nd faculty at a 40 percent discount 
ecause of a special offer through the 
eholars' College. 

Dr. Stan Chadick, acting direc- 
ar of Scholars' College, volunteered 
is IBM education product coordina- 
Dr for Northwestern. With a product 
oordinator on campus, students, fac- 
ilty and staff can purchase IBM 
quipment at state contract prices, 
Chadick said. 

"It allows people to buy this 
BM equipment at a much reduced 
ate, as a matter of fact, cheaper than 
lie university can buy it right now," 
Chadick said. 

Chadick said he was obtaining 
nfbrmation on how Scholars' College 
iculty could buy IBM equipment at a 
iscount when a representative from 
BM approached him with the propo- 
kion. The program benefits not only 
Icholars' College faculty but also 
Northwestern students and faculty. 

Although it is possible for 
ither schools to have such a program, 
Ihadick is unaware of any other pro- 
-ams in Louisiana. 

Scholars' College students are 
leing trained to work on the IBM 
quipment. According to Chadick 
nore than six students have been 
rained to show the basics of the sys- 
5m to anyone who is interested in 
uying a computer through the dis- 
ount program. 

Denise Dixon is one of the stu- 
lents trained to introduce the com- 
pter to buyers. According to Dixon, 
tudents volunteered for the task but 
'ere selected based on previous 
omputer experience. Dixon, who has 
liree years of computer science and 



competition experience, said the IBM 
computer systems at the Scholars' 
College are easy to use and self-ex- 
planatory. 

One of the IBM computer sys- 
tems available through the program is 
the Personal System II microcompu- 
ters. According to Chadick, the Per- 
sonal System II's are top-of-the line 
microcomputers. 

An example of the discount is 
the Model 30. The Model 30 retails at 
$1,950 but can be purchased by a 
Northwestern student or faculty 
member for under $1,200 including 
tax. 

According to Chadick, about 
$25 to $30 on each purchase made 
through the program will be returned 
to the Scholars' College. The money 
will be placed into the foundation in 
the form of a computer account. 
Money from the account will be used 
to purchase a computer which will be 
awarded to a faculty member based 
on a student survey or other process. 

"The Scholars' College is 
trying to provide a service and we're 
not going to get a dollar out of it," 
Chadick said of the refund. 

Although Chadick must iden- 
tify each buyer as a Northwestern 
affiliate, purchasing is as simple as 
filling out a form in Chadick's office 
and waiting for the arrival of the new 
computer system. 

The length of time between 
ordering and the arrival of the equip- 
ment has not been determined but 
Chadick expects the wait to be termed 
in weeks. Chadick also has a catalog of 
all the systems available and prices of 
the systems. 

Anyone interested in purchas- 
ing a computer system through the 
Scholars' College program should 
contact Chadick in room 239 of Kyser 
Hall or call 357-4579. 



KNWD prepares for 72 hour marathon 



KNWD's Bill "the 
Rabbit" Schneider (left) 
and Jay "Noop" Mitchell 
(right) of the "Post Tosties" 
morning show will be 
perched up on Turpin 
Stadium for a 72 hour 
marathon, with the hopes 
of raising money to 
maintain the campus radio 
station. 




Beginning Thursday morning, 
October 1, Bill "The Rabbit" Schnie- 
der and Jay "Noop" Mitchell will 
stage a marathon remote broadcast 
from atop the Turpin Stadium press 
box to raise funds for KNWD FM, the 
student owned and operated campus 
radio station. 

Schneider, a senior broadcast 
journalism major from Blair, Wis., and 
Mitchell, a freshman journalism ma- 



jor from Miami, Fla., are calling the 
fundraising project, "Stairway to 
Heaven '87." 

Schneider and Mitchell said 
they will remain on top of Turpin 
Stadium for at least 72 hours, with 
only one five minute break per hour. 
The person guessing the closest time 
when the two students come down 
from the highest point in Natchito- 



ches will win a cash award of $1 09.1 7. 
Any student who is willing to predict 
when Schneider or Mitchell descend 
from the stadium must purchase a 
two dollar raffle ticket and submit 
their guess. In case of a tie a drawing 
wil be held. 

The two dollar raffle ticket may 
also give a student the chance to win 
oneof 25different prizes being raffled 
off by KNWD every 91.7 minutes. 



Prizes for the raffle was donated by 
local Natchitoches merchants. The 
drawing will start on Thursday. 

Drawing tables will be set up in 
front of Iberville dining hall, the Stu 
dent Union, and Turpin Stadium. 

Marshall Carl, manager of 
KNWD, said, "We are trying to raise 
money to purchase new equipment 
and to fix older equipment." 



Academic Support Services offer tutoring/counseling 



Homecoming Court 




By CHARLIE MOORE 
Staff Writer 

A free lunch is hard to find; 
however, Northwestern's Academic 
Support Services offers counseling 
and tutoring to students at no charge. 

The tutoring program pro- 
vides out-of-class help in such areas as 
science, sociology, psychology, busi- 
ness, biology, Spanish, zoology, 
chemistry and physics. The tutoring 
staff consists of students and work- 
study students who tutor in areas in 
which they have a strong back- 
ground. 

In addition to offering sessions 
in the Academic Support Services 
office, tutors Dan Medlin and Carmen 
Diez are coordinating a program to 
offer tutoring services in the dorms. 
Sessions are held each Monday 6:30 to 
7:30 p.m. in Rapides Hall and 8 to 9 
P-m. in Sabine Hall. 

Under the direction of Dr. 
Mary Dillard, Academic Support 
Services offers more than just tutoring 
for students. The department also 
offers academic counseling. Aca- 
demic counselors examine individual 
students' backgrounds and help the 
student plan a college career at North- 



western. Academic counselors' duties 
include helping students set goals, 
correcting scheduling problems and 
lining up out-of-class services for stu- 
dents' specific needs. 

Beginning in October, the de- 
partment will offer the Master Stu- 
dent Series. The series involves suc- 
cessful people from the community 
meeting with students in the dorms. 
Speakers will discuss methods for 
succeeding in college and commu- 
nity. According to Medlin, the basic 
precept behind the program is to 
show students if they apply them- 
selves, they too can be successful. 

The Support Services depart- 
ment also offers Academic Skills 101 0, 
a class that teaches basic study skills. 
An additional program offering is 
special services which works with 
students in math, reading and English 
courses at the developmental level. 
Math and writing labs are available 
for students enrolled in developmen- 
tal classes. The library skills work- 
shops, which inform students on li- 
brary use, are also connected with 
Academic Support Services. 

For students who don't know 
what types of financial aid are avail- 
able, Academic Support Services of- 



fers advice in obtaining aid and assists 
in completing forms. If a student de- 
sires personal counseling, Support 
Services acts as a referral to profes- 
sional counselers in the surrounding 
area. 

Through the Academic Sup- 
port Services program, several stu- 
dent support groups have been 
formed. One group, Students Assist- 
ing Students, is a support group for 
handicapped students. The group 
works directly with the University 
Police and Northwestern administra- 
tion in developing better access to 
campus buildings. The group also 
offers assistance, if needed, to get 
around campus. Another support 
group consists of female students 
who don't like to attend university 
activities alone. Group members meet 
and attend functions together. 

A commuting and returning 
students' lounge has been placed in 
the Academic Support Services office. 
The lounge offers commuting and 
older students a place to relax be- 
tween classes. 

The Academic Support Serv- 
ices office is located in Room 104 of 
Kyser Hall and is open from 8 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m. , 



Nominees for Louisiana State Fair court announced 



Eight of the nine members from this year's Homecoming Court attend a reception 
at the Alumni Center Monday night. Standing from left to right are Dayna Dooley, 
Beth Eitel, Cindy Ross, Kimberly Antee, Homecoming Queen Melissa Canales, Kim 
Wilson, Karen Guidry, and Laurie Leblanc. Patti Smiley was unable to attend the 
reception. 



The SGA has released the offi- 
cial ballot nominies for the state fair 
court, Miss NSU and Mr. NSU. 

Elections for both positions 
will be held on Wednesday, October 
7, in the Student Union. Photographs 
of the nominees will be posted in the 
October 5 publication of the Current 
Sauce. 

Students nominated for the 



Miss NSU position are: Kim Antee, 
Marti Elkins, Rachel Heider, Monte 
Johnson, Yevette Jordan and Marcia 
Kay McLamore. Students are to vote 
for one. 

Students nominated for the 
Mr. NSU position are: Jerome Cox, 
Steve Horton, John Kulakowski and 
Jimmie McCormick. Students are to 
vote for one. 



Students nominated for the 
State Fair Court are: Brenda Burns, 
Frankie Campbell, Kirsten 
Gernhauser, Nan Goss, Rachel 
Heider, Michelle Hood, Yevette Jor- 
dan, Kelley Kyle, Angela Lacour, 
Darcy LeBlanc, Shu-Fen Lee, Tracy 
Lee, Andrea Madison, Pamela Perk- 
ins, Sonya Rigaud, Mary Simmons, 
Melissa Smith and Melody Smith. 
Students are to vote for nine. 



Page 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 29, 198; 



NEWS 



SGA posts budget/ plans senate election 



<PTEM 

EC 



By GREG KENDRICK 
Editor 

The Student Government As- 
sociation unanimously passed their 
1987 fall semester budget last night 
which amounts to $6,104. This budget 
is derived from the two dollar SGA fee 
that is part of the student association 
fee. 

Some of the expenses listed 
are: $400 for student projects; $800 for 
travel; $150 for office supplies; 
$525.22 for phone services; $1 85.80 for 
advertising; $500 for Homecoming; 
$500 for State Fair; and $300 for print- 
ing. 

The rest of the money is tied up 
in scholarships for the executive 



branch of the SGA. The expense 
stated for scholarships is S2,743. The 
SGA slated a full scholarship for the 
president, and four half-scholarships 
for four other members of the execu- 
tive cabinate this fall. One of the half- 
scholarships, belonging to Commis- 
sioner of Elections Jerome Cox, has 
not been accounted for in financial 
aid. Cox said that when financial aid 
confirms the half-scholarship the fall 
budget will increase to the appropri- 
ate amount. 

SGA President Johnny Cox 
said that even though the money has 
been listed for specific departments 
on the budget statement, there are 
plans to reappropriate the funds from 



these departments whenever needed. 

Cox cited the example of the 
coming $350 fee for the SGA to remain 
on the State Coalition Council; a stu- 
dent government special interest 
group that oftens lobbies at the state 
government level. Cox plans to pull 
money from the SGA traveling ex- 
pense fund to take care of this fee. "If 
we don't pay this fee we can't use this 
valuable service," Cox said, "We de- 
liberately placed more money than 
we needed in some of these expense 
categories to meet such emergencies." 

Another topic brought up at 
the Monday night SGA meeting was 
the filings for the freshman, sopho- 
more, senior, and graduate SGA sena- 
tor positions. Commissioner of Elec- 



tions Jerome Cox said that the filings 
for these positions will remain open 
until Wednesday, September 30, with 
the election being held the following 
Wednesday, October 7, in the Student 
Union. Cox said that students are to 
vote for two representatives from 
each class. 

Elections for the State Fair Court, 
Miss NSU, and Mr. NSU will also be 
held on Wednesday, October 7. Stu- 
dents may vote for nine for State Fair 
Court, but may only vote for one for 
both Miss NSU and Mr. NSU. 

Cox also said if any person 
interested in running for a senatorial 
position may pick up an application in 
room 309 of the Student Union. 



ALV1N DEBL1EUX, R.PH. 



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Graduate receives award 



Reatha Cole, a 1987 graduate of 
Northwestern from Fairview Alpha, 
has been awarded Sigma Sigma 
Sigma Sorority's annual Mabel Lee 
Walton Award, which is a prestigious 
national honor. 

Miss Cole graduated from 
Northwestern in May with a 
bachelor's degree in Journalism with 
a concentration in Public Relations. 
She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Wayne Zumwalt of Fairview Alpha. 

While an undergraduate student 
at Northwestern, Miss Cole served as 
president of the Alpha Zeta chapter of 
Sigma Sigma Sigma. 

Her other honors include Miss 
NSU, the highest elected honor at the 
university, as well as the National 
Collegiate Greek Merit Award and 
the Sigma Sigma Sigma Eve Mouton 
Award. 

Miss Cole was also selected to 
Who's Who Among Students in 



American Universities and Colleges, 
Outstanding Young Women of Amer- 
ica, the Northwestern Purple Jackets 
honorary service organization and as 
a member of the State Fair Court. 

While at Northwestern, she 
served her public relations internship 
with the Natchitoches Area Chamber 
of Commerce. She was also a staff 
writer and advertising manager for 
the student newspaper, the Current 
Sauce. 

Additional activities at North- 
western included serving as vice- 
president of both the NSU chapter of 
Public Relations Student Society of 
America and the Student Activities 
Board. She was also a member of 
Sigma Delta Chi (The Society of Pro- 
fessional Journalists) and the Student 
Government Association. 

Miss Cole is currently serving as 
a national field representative for 
Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority. 





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*PTEMBER29, 1987 
m ^= 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



EDITORIAL 



3NER, R.PH* 



ACY 



.A 71457 

•s: 352-4923 
or 352-4246 



CIS 



The members of the Current Sauce again reminds the student body that 
this paper is here to voice your demands. The mail correspondence has 
increased within the past weeks, but we are positive that there are many 
more complaints that have not been exposed to the public eye. 

We at the Current Sauce will welcome any letters to the editor, any 
comments about our service, or any tips about a story that may affect student 
life. 

Because of the limited size of our staff, the Current Sauce is not able to 
keep abreast of all events that occur around campus. Therefore, we ask that 
all groups and organizations inform the Current Sauce of of any planned 
future events. 

This paper should be a reflection of the student lifestyle at Northwestern. 
With the student body's assistance and cooperation, this paper will cater to 
the interests and demands of this university. 



lours: 

Mon.-Fri. 
30 Saturdays 



Avid football fan on strike 



TD 

17 

233 

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Gas 

ee Refrigerator 
970 




KIRK COPELAND 
oris Editor 

As you know from watching 
vision, listening to the radio, and 
Hding several thousands of editori- 
jn various forms of the print me- 
I the National Football League 
yers Association (NFLPA) walked 
) on strike as of last Tuesday at 
jnight. I, as a fan of all sports, have 
Dice in the matter as well. 

I consider myself to be an in- 
med fan, seeing that I can name 
Super Bowl champion since 
n Bay won the inaugural NFL- 
L World Championship Game 
yback in 1967 and can tell you the 
ne of the player that sat out be- 
se of a headache and started Lou 
lirig's incredible string of consecu- 
! games. However, even though I 
_>w what is basically going on in the 
%e situation, I, like most other fans, 
-re trouble sitting back and feeling 
ry for someone who in one year (or, 
some, one day) what I can only 
am of making in the course of a 
ade. 

For those of you who are fans 
he NFL but still do not understand 
I players gripes, here is a brief 
amary of the players' demands. 

The big issue is, apparently, 
(agency. Players want to have the 
it to auction themselves off to the 
hest bidder after a four-year pe- 
I in the league. This, to me, is 
culous. Say, for example, Jim 
quarterback for the Buffalo 



Bills, miraculously takes the Bills to a 
world championship in 1989. Should 
he have the right to betray the Buffalo 
fans and jump ship to increase his 
salary from over $15 million to, 
maybe, $2 million? I think not. 

On the other hand, say that 
Doug Williams of the Washington 
Redskins fills in for an injured Jay 
Schroeder and leads the 'Skins to a 
title. I could sympathize with Wil- 
liams, who made, say, $50,000 for his 
role in the championship season and 
was stuck in a long-term, non-nego- 
tiable contract. Maybe a compromise 
could be met in this situation whereby 
this type athlete could be compen- 
sated for his phenomenal perform- 
ance. 1 doubt it, though, the way the 
players and owners negotiate. 

Another big issue is player 
pension. The players' gripe, and a 
good one at that, I guess, is that a 
career in the NFL is very brief and the 
players need financial security after 
they retire. Again, this goes back to 
how much money a player makes 
while he is playing. Take, for example, 
someone like Tony Dorsett of the 
Cowboys. He has been making close 
to a million dollars a year (not to 
mention the money he has made on 
endorsements) since he came to the 
NFL in 1976. He probably would not 
need the pension money, unless his 
career tragically ended and he needed 
medical treatment for the better part 
of his life. 

On the other hand, Joe Blow of 
the Buccaneers, who makes the mini- 



mum $50,000, might play second 
team for three years, get into a lop- 
sided game and tear up his knee and 
be forced to retire. He is a victim of the 
system and should be compensated. 

Their are several other smaller 
issues, most of which are silly little 
tidbits hardly worth mentioning. The 
major thing about the strike I would 
like to get across is the stupidity of it. 
The NFLPA isoneofthemost pathetic 
excuses for a union in existance today. 
The players have to go out on strike 
every time their contract with the NFL 
expires because they demand more 
and more in every contract. And 
when the players strike, the losers are 
not the owners, but the fans who pay 
to see these monsters crash into one 
another every weekend. 

What fans should do is go out 
on strike themselves. Quit attending 
the games and watching them on tele- 
vision and then see who loses out. In 
that time you could be watching col- 
lege football or mowing the yard. You 
could start attending your high 
school's football games on weekends. 
Besides, the college and prep teams 
play more exciting football than the 
highly- specialized pros. 

Whenever the NFLPA and 
management settle their strike, join 
with me and others in boycotting the 
games. Make your voice in the matter 
heard. 

Incidentally, Lou Gehrig re- 
placed Wally Pipp at first base to start 
his incredible streak. If you want to 
know the Super Bowl winners, ask me 
around campus. 



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ENTER 



Pre-sophomore 
survival tips 



arents forgotten 

tudent addresses administration 



OS 0f 1 iEdi.0, 
al Parent's Day. A day any parent 

CtiSOV ^ appreciate. Too bad not all 
* tnts were notified in time to attend 
SpXCy | event. Read on. 

My parents are residents of 
ige City, La. (a suburb of New 
feans), and are as proud of this 
tpus as any of us here. However, 
jr did not receive their invitation 
U noon on the Saturday of the 
nt. Why? The letter, postmarked 
1 8, was not mailed by North west- 
Ifirst-class but rather with "more 
Oomical" 8 cents postage. The in- 
on took 11 days to reach its des- 
ion. However, if a 22 cent stamp 




were used, on-time delivery would 
have been practically guaranteed, 
considering first class letters mailed 
both to and from my hometown are 
received within three days. 

I could understand the univer- 
sity using a lower postage rate on mail 
for prospective high school students 
and others not yet part of the North- 
western system, but to utilize this 
method on the registered students of 
the university doesn't make sense. It 
bewilders me that even though my 
parents paid $1,600 plus in tuition and 
fees for my enrollment this semester, 
Northwestern could not spare 14 



cents extra postage for the mailing of 
such an important letter. I myself 
would have gladly provided the few 
pennies it would have taken to see my 
parents invited in time. They were not 
only hurt that they missed the event 
but they felt insulted as well. After all, 
did my mother and father really get 
what they paid for? 

Classmates, if the next time 
your parents receive a letter from 
Northwestern and it is delivered on 
horseback, tell them not to be sur- 
prised. It's only "policy". ..and it's 
cheaper. 

Melvin Lecompte 



By MICHELLE WE EGO 
Staff Writer 

Just when I thought it was safe 
to go back to the classroom I find 
myself being called a freshman again. 

The term freshman brings back 
memories of being sent to non-exis- 
tent hallways, being told to call teach- 
ers by their first names and being 
ringed by seniors in the corridors. 
Being a freshman in college, however, 
isn't bad compared to high school. As 
a Northwestern pre-sophomore (as I 
prefer to be called), I made many dis- 
coveries about college. 

Number one on my how-to- 
survive-college-as-a-pre- sophomore 
list was finding my way around cam- 
pus. Alittleoveramonth ago my folks 
packed me up, drove me to Sabine 
Hall, patted me on my head and left 
saying, "Study hard, darling!" I was 
more concerned with finding the 
bathroom, cafeteria and how to get 
out of the building. Having moved 
my stuff in through the back door, I 
assumed it was the only entrance and 
used it for the next two weeks. 

My roommate and I forgot 
unpacking the first night and decided 
to explore Northwestern and Natchi- 
toches. After examining the campus, I 
decided that whoever designed 
Northwestern either had a sick sense 
of humor or must have been roaring 
drunk at the time. 

For example in the education 
building, someone please explain 
what the heck a "pod" is. The strang- 
est place on campus is Watson Li- 
brary. It took us a full 15 minutes to 
find the entrance. The next architec- 
tual oddity is Kyser Hall. I want to 
know who numbered the doorways. 

As far Natchitoches, all we had 
to master was how to get to "the 
strip," A&P and the bank. 

Number two on my list is the 
Northwestern social scene concern- 
ing pre-sophomores — specifically 
those "of age." Greek rush made me 



CURRENT SAUCE 



realize there is more to college than 
studying. Although I was told this 
year's fraternity rush was "dry," that 
didn't stop anyone from having a 
good time afterward at such places as 
the Student Body and Yesterday's. I 
can pinpoint (I think) the night of my 
first college drunken stupor to Rush 
Week. 

Number three deals with class 
attendance or should I say class non- 
attendance? The first day of class, 
professors unlocked their doors to 
eager college students who pounded 
their way down the hall bearing new 
pens, pencils and paper, dying to 
learn the latest in Shakespeare's son- 
nets. Let's get serious! I think the pre- 
sophomores were the only ones to 
brave the cold tile floors of Kyser for at 
least a week. 

Sitting in an almost empty 
classroom, I soon learned I could skip 
four classes a semester, copy someone 
else's notes, gain an extra day of sleep 
by lying about a deceased grand- 
mother and still pass. 
Number four is living on a limited 
budget. Two weeks into the semester, 
my roommate and I decided it was 
time to start eating real food. We made 
a trip to A&P with an unprepared 
budget. After getting the ticket for 
$1 7.35 and having nothing to show for 
it except soft drinks, Froot Loops, 
milk, cookies and three boxes of Little 
Debbie Snack Cakes, we decided 
domesticity was a little harder than it 
seemed. Luckily my parents antici- 
pated this sort of experience and 
slipped me a few twenties in the mail. 

After a month of learning how 
to survive on my own, I've become an 
experienced college hand. 1 can find 
my way around campus or town, go 
to a party and drive myself home, get 
to an 8:00 class before the teacher 
reaches my name on the role and walk 
into the grocery store to purchase the 
exact item I came for. I guess this 
means I'm ready to tackle the world. 



Have something to say? WRITE A LETTER TO THE EDITOR! 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 



LISA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 



KIRK COPELAND 

Sports Editor 



MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
WANDA HAMILTON 
CHARLIE MOORE 
CHRIS HUNT 
SONYA RIGAUD 
MICHELLE WEEGO 
Staff Writers 



ALLEN EVANS 

Advertising Manager 



EDD LEE 

Circulation/Distribution 



CHARLOTTE RUSH 

Photo Ediltor 



TEDRIS SMITH 
WILLIAM FRANCO 

Photographers 



ROBERT BROWN 

Layout Editor 



TOM WHITEHEAD 

Adviser 



RRENT QUOTES 



i 
i 
i 

i 
i 

4 



Do you think that students are well informed about events around campus? 






■ 





t 



•* Luck 

l English Education 

Hchitoches 

As well as they can be wtth the 



Barbera Clark 
1-1, Business 
Natchitoches 

"The only way I find out is by 



iio station, Current Sauce, and the wor d of mouth. I am never aware of any formed enough. There are not , enough 
ns outside." flyerstfe." 



Melanie Wall 
1-2, Music 
Many 

"For the most part the media does 
a good job about publishing the events, 
signs in view at the Student Union. They There are flyers posted, but it could be a 
are all in the dorm." little better. " 



Eric Davis 
4-1, Business 
Many 

"Off campus students are not in 



Kent Laborde 
Scholar's College 
Mansura 

"Some people are informed, but 
not enough are." 



The Current Sauce is 
published weekly during the foB 
and spring semesters by the stu- 
dents of Northwestern State Uni- 
versity of Louisiana. It is not asso- 
ciated with any of the 
University's departments and is 
financed independently. 

The Current Sauce is 
based in the Office of Student 
Publications iocated in Kyser 
Hall. The office of the editorial 
staff is 225H. teiephone (318) 
357-5456 The adviser's office is 
103 Kyser Had. telephone 357- 
5213. 

The matting address for 
the Current Sauce is P.O. Box 
5306, NSU. Natchitoches, LA 
71497. 

All correspondence, fn- 
cSjcing letters to the editor is 
welcome Material submitted 
for consideration must be 
mailed to above address or 
brought to the office. 

The deadline for oil ad- 
vertising and copy is Friday by 3 
p.m. inclusion of any and oil 
matertal s left to the discretion of 
the editor. 

Letters to the editor 
should be typed (doubie- 
spacea) signed, and should irv 
ciude a telephone number 
where the writer can be 
reached No anonymous letters 
will be printed. 

Current sauce subscrip- 
tion rates are S 1 ! per academic 
year (27 issues) or S6 per 
sem est ei (14 issues). The paper is 
entered as second-class mail at 
Natchitoches, LA. The USPS 
number is 140-660 



Page 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 29, 198}' 



SPORTS 



Demons prepare for homecoming bout with NLU Indians 



By KIRK COPELAND 
Sports Editor 

Northwestern State 
University's Demons spent their 
much-needed off week trying to put a 
toughloss at the hands of North Texas 
State last Saturday behind them and 
working on fundamentals for the 
homecoming game next Saturday, 
according to Demon head honcho 
Sam Goodwin. 

"We've had a hectic week 
working on fundamentals but we've 
also had time to rest," said Goodwin. 
"We had some' misexecution last 
week and we've been working hard to 
correct it. North Texas was a physical 
team but we beat ourselves." 

The Men in Purple have a 
tough task ahead of them as they will 
meet Stan Humphries and the North- 
east Louisiana Indians in a Southland 
Conference showdown this Saturday. 
NLU is coming off of big wins against 
Louisiana Tech, Southwest Texas 
State, and Nicholls State and should 
prove to be the Demons' toughest 
opponent to date. 

"Northeast is a great defensive 
team," said the. coach. "They make 
you do a lot of things you don't want 
to do. They remind me a lot of our 



defense, as far as quickness and ag- 
gressiveness goes. They're a little bit 
bigger than we are. Their linebackers 
swarm to the ballcarrier." 

On offense, the Indians are led 
by Humphries, who has passed for an 
overwhelming 950 yards in just three 
contests while completing a whop- 
ping 55 percent of his passes. More 
impressively, though, is the fact that 
in that stretch Humphries has not 
thrown a single pass to an enemy jer- 
sey. 

"Stan Humphries impressed 
me," said Goodwin. "He's pretty 
mobile and he's every bit as strong as 
(former NLU quarterback Bubby) 
Brister." 

"Offensively, Northeast is 
very sound scheme-wise," continued 
Goodwin. "They're only average in 
the running department (125 yards 
per game) but their passing game 
makes up for it. They have an excel- 
lent kicking game which concerns me. 
(Teddy) Garcia has been an all-confer- 
ence kicker for a couple of years, and 
considering how we've looked on the 
place kick unit, that could be their 
advantage." 

Goodwin said that he had 
worked hard with his kickers and 
hopes that they can improve over last 
week's game when Keith Hodnett 



missed two field goals, had another 
blocked, and had an extra-point con- 
version batted away. 

"We've made some changes on 
our kick team to try and get more 
time," said the Top Demon. "We may 
even use another kicker to get the ball 
up quicker. I hope that they do better 
than in previous games." 

According to Goodwin, the 
Fiery Ones have to "put pressure on 
Humphries on defense and stay away 
from minus yardage plays and turn- 
overs on offense" in order to beat 
NLU. 

This is Northwestern's 38th 
homecoming game since 1 948 and has 
posted a 23-15 record in those con- 
tests. NSU has played the Tribe on 
seven homecoming occasions, com- 
ing out on top in five while dropping 
two. 

In the overall series, the De- 
mons hold an impressive 24-11 ad- 
vantage after taking last year's match 
between the two teams in heart -stop- 
ping fashion, 17-14, on a last-second 
Hodnett field goal. 

The teams square off in the 
friendly confines of Turpin Stadium 
at 2 p.m. Saturday. 



Graduate "N" Club Hall of Fame to gain six members 



By TOM WANCHO 
Sports Information 

Northwestern State will in- 
duct six of its former athletes into the 
school's Graduate "N" Club Hall of 
Fame on Saturday, October 3, 1987. 
Ceremonies, which will be conducted 
in the NSU Fieldhouse, will begin at 
10 a.m. with the homecoming contest 
against Northeast Louisiana sched- 
uled to start at 2 p.m. that afternoon. 

Bringing membership in the 
"N" Club to 91 are Pete Beck, Bert 
Heckel, David Clark, Donald 
Johnson, Danny Bob Turner and 
Johnny Jackson. 

Beck was a fullback on the 
Demon football team from 1948 thru 
1950. He was named to the all-Gulf 
Star Conference team as both a full- 
back and linebacker before entering 
the United States Air Force. From 
1950-54 Beck played for an Air Force 
team in Naoya, Japan and was 
awarded All-Far East honors with a 
record 99 yard touchdown run. He 
prepped at Minden High School, 
where he was all-state in both basket- 
ball and football. 

Heckel was a three-time all- 
Gulf States tackle from 1957 thru 1959 
and was a member of the all-GSC 
track and field team for four years 
after his efforts in the shot put and 

Lady Demons stopped 
in comeback attempt 

By KIRK COPELAND 
Sports Editor 

Victory was not meant to be for 
the Lady Demons Monday night as 
they rallied from a two-game deficit 
only to be turned back by Southern 
University's Lady Jaguars by a score 
of 9-15, 10-15, 15-7, 15-8, 0-15. 

The Lady Demons came back 
after trailing 6-2 in the fourth game to 
take the game and end their scoring 
for the night as Southern reeled off 15 
straight points in the finale to take the 
match. 

Leading the way for North- 
western were Dawn Carlos with five 
service aces, 14 kills and 13 digs; Sonja 
Dale with 21 digs, two block solos, 
two service aces, and 12 kills; Annie 
Bloxson with 18 kills and nine digs; 
Colette Jones with 20 assists; and 
Tonya Champagne with 21 assists 
and 13 digs. 



discus. He set NSU records in both 
events and also broke the conference 
standard in the shot put with a 52-9 
heave. Heckell was Slidell's first foot- 
ball All- American and es a high 
school senior was a co-captain in an 
all- star contest with future LSU Heis- 
man trophy winner Billy Cannon. As 
a prep, he set records in the shot put 
(55-5) and discus (152-10) that still 
stand today as Class A marks. 

Clark was an outstanding bas- 
ketball player at NSU during themid- 
1960's. Currently fifth on the all-time 
member of the Gulf States basketball 
team and led NSU in scoring during 
his sophomore, junior and senior 
campaigns. He averaged over 16 
points during his career, and his free 
throw percentage of 83.3 percent is 
third on the all-time list. Clark was a 
graduate assistant coach for current 
NSU athletic director Tynes Hilde- 
brand following graduation and 
coached at Campti High School from 
1972-84, taking the Gators to the state 
playoffs seven times while being 
tabbed District Coach of the Year on 
four occasions. 

Johnson is fourth on the De- 
mons all-time rushing list with 2253 
yards and was tops on the list (ahead 
of Charlie Tolar) when he left school 
in 1973. His year by year average per 
carry increased from 6.3 to 6.7 (fresh- 



man to junior seasons) and when his 
887 yards in 1 972 were the best ever by 
a Demon back at the time. His post 
season honors includes first team all- 
State, Offensive Player of the Year in 
the Gulf South conference and team 
MVP. 

Turner is one of only two base- 
ball All-Americas from Northwestern 
State, achieving that status in 1 967-68. 
He earned four varsity letters as a 
third baseman and was a Gulf States 
pick at the hot corner in 1966, 1967, 
and 1968. His .444 batting average in 
1967 was the nation's fifth best and he 
owns the record for most triples in 
consecutive times at bat with four 
against Southwestern Louisiana in a 
1967 doubleheader. Turner was also a 
member of the 1966 undefeated foot- 
ball team. 



Jackson was a track and foot- 
ball performer for the Demons in the 
late 1940% enrolling at NSU after 
completing service in the U. S. Navy in 
the fall of 1946. As a running back, he 
was selected to the Gulf States confer- 
ence team in 1947 (first team) and 
competed in the 100 and 200 meter 
dashes along with the 440 and 880 
relays. He was a member of the 1947 
track foursome that won the South- 
western team track title. 



YOU 



are the ke y to responsible 
decisions 



concerning alcohol 




Help prevent alcohol abuse through education 

October 12-16,1987 
Support National Collegiate 
Alcohol Awareness Week 



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Natchitoches, LA 

* * NOTICE * * 

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Student Discount Available 



Demons jump to eighth, NLU second in poll 



By KIRK COPELAND 
Sports Editor 

Even though they had an off 
week, Northwestern's Demons 
climbed up three notches in the na- 
tional polls from number eleven last 
week to number eight in the most 
recent poll. 



Northeast Louisiana, the De- 
mons' opponent in this week's home- 
coming game, went from number 
three in last week's poll to number 
two after defeating Nicholls State 26- 
14 last Saturday in Monroe. 

The Indians ride into town 
Saturday for the 2 p.m.matchup in 
Turpin Stadium. 



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Scout team is big 
part of Demons' 
success formula 

By CHRIS HUNT 
Staff Writer 

Who are the men behind the 
Demon's football success thus far this 
season? One might say the coaches, 
some might say the fans, but very few 
people would come out and say, 
"Hey, it's the scout team." 

What is the scout team? 

Delicately stated, the scout 
team is a group of gung-ho maniacs 
that work out with the football team. 
They give the starters a visual picture 
of what to expect on gameday. 

The scout offense looks at a 
card held up by a coach in practice, 
and they get their assignments to run 
against the Demon defense. It is easier 
to stop an offense if what they are 
doing is familiar. 

The scout defense character- 
izes the next opponents defense. They 
stunt in some situations or they blitz 
in other situations. This gives the 
coaches a good game plan to go on by 
seeing which plays are successful, and 
which plays are easily stopped. 

The scout team consists of 
about thirty five freshmen, and a few 
upperclassmen who have not devel- 
oped into their full potential, or they 
just have to spend more time learning 
the basics. 

One might think that because 
the scout team is always working 
against the starting Demons, they 
never get to improve themselves, but 
they do have their own practices as 
well. They work basically on funda- 
mentals since they have no games to 
prepare for. 

It is easy for one to see how 
depressing it would be to be on the 
scout team, sitting on the bench wait- 
ing. But there is some consolation for 
the average scout teamer. They can 
take heart in every victory earned by 
the Demons because it was their 
preparations and hard work for seem- 
ingly no reward that made the victory 
possible. 

The next time John Stephens 
turns the corner into the end zone, or 
the next time John Kulakowski breaks 
through the line for a sack, about 
thirty-five players on the sideline will 
be smiling knowing that it was their 
dedication that paid off. 



Johnny's Restaurant 

Located in the El Camino across from NSU 

Open from 6 a.m. - 10 p.m., 7 days a week 

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Takeout orders welcome 

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Phone 352-4426 

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Yoh should have seen J. T. run. Even with the 
ph ysicat limi tat ions he had to overcome, there teas u 
special grare to his stride. But it u as Ins fare that 
captivated the observer. Such undaunted detennina 
Hon. such unbridled spirit u as gripping, inspiring. 

J.T. didn 't win first place. Not even second. Fai t 
is. he just avoided being last by ubouf two steps. His 
victory u as from within: through sheer will and 
effort, he transcended the disadvantages that fate 
and nature had imposed on him. He was every inch 
a winner. I 



The Louisiana Investor-^wned Electric Companies enthusiastically support 
the Special Olympics program. The courage shown by the competitors in over- 
coming personal adversities serves as a model for us all in today's difficult 
economic times. These plucky athletes convincingly demonstrate how to draw- 
on other strengths when jone facility is diminished. 

The LIOEC applauds the contenders, the staff, and the volunteers of the 
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SEPTEMBER 29, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 5 



NEWS 



Black greek organization rush continues 



,, r"«ly WANDA HAMILTON 
-all subjects C,_ ff Wri ter 

v.sa/MC or COO " Q " r,Ter 

51-0222 Every student has different 
rehSw, dreams and goals for college. Usually, 
.Angeies CA 90025 the main priority is to eam a college 
abie-aii ;eveis ^ a ^ roa However, life in between 
classes is also an important aspect and 
That's where fraternities and sororities 
come into the picture. 

Many college students con- 
sider joining a Greek organization to 
broaden their college experiences. 
During a period called rush, students 
interested in fraternities and sorori- 
ties examine each group and meet its 
members. Prospective members learn 
of each groups different activities and 
rules. 

Pan-Hellenic rush has been 
taking place at Northwestern the past 
few weeks and more than 25 students 
joined the Greek system. Rush is not 
over, however, as some groups are 
awaiting word from their national 
headquarters before placing prospec- 
tive members on line (pledging). 



Pan-Hellenic is the governing 
board for the black Greek social frater- 
nities and sororities. At Northwest- 
ern, Pan-Hellenic consists of four fra- 



ternities and three sororities. 

Alpha Phi Alpha, the first 
black social fraternity, was founded in 
1906. An Alpha man can be spotted 
wearing the colors of black and gold. 
The Alpha Phi Alpha motto reads, 
"First of all, servants of all, we shall 
transcend all." Alpha men are known 
as "men of distinction." 

The Northwestern chapter of 
Alpha Phi Alpha is on line 22 this fall. 
Presently on line for Alpha Phi Alpha 
are Eric Johnson, Frank Gammage Jr., 
Mark Spikes, Antonio Smith, Joe 
English, Ronald Wilkins, John 
Sampson, Brian Brown, Eric Lee and 
Jarvan Piper. The men will be on line 
for four weeks. 

Kappa Alpha Psi's motto is, 
"Striving for Achievement." The fra- 
ternity presently has 12 active mem- 
bers and can be spotted wearing crim- 
son and cream. The Kappas are also 
well known for the red and white 
canes they use in Greek shows. 

The Northwestern chapter of 
Kappa Alpha Psi is on line 16 this fall. 
On line are Lazar Hearn, Brian Mc- 
Caskill, Val Clay, Henry Dibrell, Mal- 
colm Bernstine, Andre' Johnson, Ger- 
ald Brown and Frank Duson. 



Before announcing their fall 
line, Omega Psi Phi is awaiting infor- 
mation from their national headquar- 
ters. The Northwestern chapter of 
Omega Psi Phi will be on line 25 this 
fall. The Omega's are recognized 
around campus for their purple and 
gold colors and gold boots. Known as 
Q-Dogs, the Omega's can often be 
heard around campus barking greet- 
ings to one another. 

Phi Beta Sigma fraternity 
members strive to be "Men dedicated 
to humanity." The Sigma's presently 
have James Sweeney on line. The fra- 
ternity is known for its blue and white 
colors and canes. 

Concerning the sororities, 
Alpha Kappa Alpha is awaiting word 
from national headquarters prior to 
naming their fall pledges. The AKA's 
are known for their pink and green 
colors. 

Delta Sigma Theta, also await- 
ing approval from their national, will 
be on line 26 this fall. Delta Sigma 
Theta colors are red and white. 

According to the members of 
Zeta Phi Beta, high academic stan- 
dards are placed above everything 
else. The Zeta's, known by royal blue 



and white, currently have five women 
on line. The pledges are Melissa 
Franks, Yetta' James, Tracy Johnson, 
Sonya Dale and Carlett Jones. 

In addition to holding rush 
functions, the Pan-Hellenic fraterni- 
ties at Northwestern have also been 
making plans for homecoming. Alpha 
Phi Alpha will hold a homecoming 
dancell p.m.to7a.m.Saturdayatthe 
National Guard Armory on Fair- 
ground Road. Admission is S3 in 
advance and S4 at the door. The party 
DJ will be the "one and only captivat- 
ing Captain Midnight." 

Kappa Alpha Psi will hold a 
homecoming barbecue Saturday. 
Tickets can be purchased from active 
members. 

The Omega's will hold a home- 
coming party 10 p.m. Saturday to 6 
p.m. Sunday at Ben Johnson Audito- 
rium. Admission is S3 in advance, S4 
at the door or S5 per couple. Everyone 
is invited to attend the overnight 
party. 

Phi Beta Sigma will hold a 
Greek Show homecoming night. All 
students are invited to attend. For 
more information, contact a Phi Beta 
Sigma. 



BACK TO KINKO'S 




Head over to Kinko's for all of your copying needs 
this term and discover outstanding quality and 
abundant services at very affordable prices. 
We're close to campus, open early, open late and 
open weekends. 



kinko's 

621 BOSSIER 
352-8155 



SAB HOMECOMING WEEK ACTIVITIES 



Monday. Sept. 28 - 'Nothing In Common* will be shown St 
7:50 p.m. In Union Station. 

Tuesday. Sent. 29 - 'Homecoming Honeys* — 8:00 p.m. In the 
Student Union Ballroom — Men's beauty 
pageant ..... sign up today and win 
$50.00 for 1st Place. 

Wednesday. Sept. 50 - "Purple and UJhlte Day* — Shorn your 
Northwestern Spirit by wearing our 
school colors. 

'Pep Rally'-Student Body-9:50 p.m. 



Thursday. Oct. 1 - "Mark Pitta" Comedian — will perform 
at 7:00 p.m. in Union Station. 

Friday. Oct. 2 -Facuitu. Staff, & fldmlnistratiue Reception — 
5:50 p.m. at Alumni Center. 
-SGfl Homecoming Parade -- 6:50 p.m. 
-Homecoming Pep Rally and Presentation of the 
Court -- in front of Union Station at 7:00 p.m. 
-"Tim Settlmi" -- Comedian/Mime -- will 
perform at 7:30 p.m. in Union Station. 

saturdau. Oct. 5 - 2:00 p.m. — Beat Northeast i ! ! 

rOR MORE INFORMATION r Hit. 65 1 1 -STUDENT RCTIUITICS BOflRO 





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Page 6 



CURRENT SAUCE 



September 29. 1987 ^ 



CAMPUS LINE 



Senior day 

The Office of Admissions and 
Recruiting is sponsoring 
Northwestern' s annual Senior Day 
this Saturday. Conducted in conjunc- 
tion with the 103rd homecoming, 
public and private high school seniors 
from throughout Louisiana and sur- 
rounding states will attend. 

The day's activities include a 
welcome at 11 a.m. in the A. A. Freder- 
icks Fine Arts Auditorium, a picnic 
lunch at the president's home, a pep 
rally and the 2 p.m. Northwestern vs. 
Northeast football game. Following 
the game, seniors will be treated to a 
dance in Prather Coliseum from 5 to 8 
p.m. and featuring KTUX disc jockey 
Bobby Cooke of Shreveport. 

Organization cards 

All campus organizations 
must renew their organizational 
cards in room 214 of the Student 
Union this week. In addition to re- 
newing the card, each group must 
submit a copy of their current 
constitution. Groups failing to renew 
the organizational card will be consid- 
ered inactive. 

BACCHUS 

Boost Alcohol Consciousness 
Concerning the Health of University 
Students (BACCHUS) is located in 
room 31 1 of the Student Union. Office 
hours are 2 to 4 p.m. Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday and 11 a.m. to 
noon Tuesday and Thursday. BAC- 
CHUS is a non-profit organization 
which promotes responsible decision 
making concerning alcohol and drug 
abuse on college campuses. 

Students wishing to join BAC- 
CHUS should go by or call the office at 
357-5287. Information about BAC- 
CHUS can also be obtained at the In- 
firmary. 

Tax law 

Northwestern's Personnel Of- 
fice announces that it is now manda- 
tory that all dependent children have 
a social security number by Jan. 1, 
1988. 



Dance classes 

Country-western dance 
classes for adults will begin Thurs- 
day, October 1, and continue through 
December 10 under the sponsorship 
of Northwestern's Division of Con- 
tinuing Education and Community 
Services. 

The registration fees are S35 for 
singles, $70 for couples and $15 for 
senior citizens. The classes will run 
from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in room 
123 of the Physical Education Majors 
Building. The instructor will be Cath- 
erine Hanna. 

Pre-law association 

A Pre-Law and Paralegal As- 
sociation has been formed at North- 
western, according to Dr. Maxine 
Taylor, head of Department of His- 
tory, Social Sciences and Social Work 
and pre-law adviser. The first meeting 
is set for 1 1 a.m. Oct. 8 room 206 Kyser 
Hall. 



The purpose of the group is to 
encourage and assist students in 
preparation for law school or the 
paralegal profession. Group plans 
include LSAT review workshops, 
guest attorney speakers, preparing 
students for attending law school 
admissions fairs and to inform stu- 
dents about law school admission 
requirements and available scholar- 
ships. 

Taylor said Northwestern 
graduates have always done well in 
law school. In a recent study the suc- 
cess rate of Northwestern's graduates 
was the highest for the nine public 
institutions of higher learning in 
Louisiana. 

Taylor said most law schools 
do not require a prospective student 
to pursue a pre-law program of stud- 
ies. All prospective law students must 
pass the Law School Aptitude Test 
and should have completed a four- 
year degree with a good grade point 
average. 

For more information on the 
association and law school, contact 
Taylor at 301 Kyser Hall or call 357- 
6195. 



Support groups 

The Commuting and Return- 
ing Students' Support Group will 
meet 11 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 6. The 
meeting will be held in the commut- 
ing and returning students' lounge 
room 104 Kyser Hall. 

Students Assisting Students 
(SAS) will hold its first meeting of the 
semester 11 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 8 in 
room 104 Kyser Hall. All members are 
encouraged to attend. 

Veterinary school 

Dean Besch, from the School of 
Veterinary Medicine, LSU, will be on 
campus 9:30 a.m. Wednesday. All 
students interested in veterinary 
medicine, especially those applying 
for veterinary school in the fall of 
1988, should make plans to meet with 
Besch in Williamson Hall room 209. 
For more information call Dr. 
Younger at 357-5912. 

Iberville 

Campus groups and clubs 
wishing to obtain wallspace in Iber- 
ville Dining Hall for use should con- 
tact James Taylor, director of board 
operations, at 357-6451. Taylor said 
wall space will be issued on a first- 
come first-serve basis. Wall space will 
be assigned to specific groups to use 
as they please for posting notices, 
hanging group pictures or group 
crests. 



Library hours 

Watson Library service hours 
for the 1987 fall semester are from 8 
a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday; 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday; 10 
a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; and 2 to 10 
p.m. Sunday. 

The media/serials division 
closes at 10 p.m. weeknights. The 
Gammie Henry Research Center is 
open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through 
Friday. 

Due to the increase in aca- 
demic emphasis on campus, students 
are urged to locate and secure study 
and research materials well in ad- 
vance of assignment deadlines. 



Inside Watson Library 

Online computer database searching 



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This is the third article in a 
series on Watson Library. 

MacDonald's and Burger King 
may have fast food but Watson Li- 
brary has fast information. 

Online computer database 
searching, using a computer to con- 
tact a mainframe computer database 
at another location, is available 
through Bibliographic Retrieval Serv- 
ice (BRS). The BRS can save students 
hours of poring over and slogging 
through paper indexes to biblio- 
graphic and other types of informa- 
tion. 

BRS and the reference staff at 
Watson Library can put students in 
touch with more than 100 available 
databases such as Resources in 
Education (ERIC). Social Work 
Abstracts, the Merck Index. Disclo- 
sure Online and National Technical 
Information Service (NTIS). 

The online database offers stu- 
dent access to indexes which are not 
available on Northwestern's campus 



or in Natchitoches. Since the data 
bases are updated before their paper 
counterparts are printed, a computer 
search enables students to see the 
most current information in their field 
of inquiry. 

The online service is especially 
useful for performing a "boolean 
search." The computer can take two or 
more subject terms and connect them 
by the boolean operators — "and," 
"or" and "not" — narrowing the re- 
sults of the search to information 
which fits designated parameters. 

The results of the search will 
likely be a list of bibliographic cita- 
tions often with abstracts or summa- 
ries which must be looked up. The 
search does not guarantee that cita- 
tions are materials held in Watson 
Library. Some of the items discovered 
through the search may have to be 
borrowed through inter-library loan. 

The fee for the online search 
service is based on the amount of 



NORT 



IG 

GREG KENC 
or 

The Stud 
ation voted 
s NSU no 
ht after a con 
questioning 




online time or connect time, the tele- § 
communications (telephone line) 
costs, and the fees or royalt ies cha rgoo ; 
by the producer of the database bein^ jj 
researched. Fees may range from 5( 
cents to SI 40 for a complex search oj * 
an expensive database. 

Abbie Landry, coordinator oi 
online services at Watson Library 
said she does her best to prepare i 
search which will get Big Mac resul! 
at cheeseburger prices. 

Landry was trained in data 
base searching at a seminar in Dallai 
sponsored by BRS. She received bot 
her computer training and a master") 
degree in library and information sci 
ence from the University of Texas.|P rocessin 8 
Landry was chairperson of the Louisi-I ^h e mot 
ana Library Association's Onliner* MissNSUn 
Interest Group for 1985-86. 'f the State F ' 

For further details concerningpP' 6 ^ a ^ er 1 
online computer searches, contact! ' tnree time 
Landry or any member of Watson^ mot ' on ^ e 
Library's reference staff. Kmc in its de 

The deba 
|er of contes 
Chairman 
tte Fair Chai 
ka.Inthelette 
estioned the 
}. and Miss Ni 
e election boa 



MICHELE BR 1 
Writer 

"Don't A 
e theme of I 
1 Awareness 1 
•16. 

The acti 
Ing co-sponso 
|nsciousness 
pith of Unive 
IUS), Studen 
(lion (SGA) ai 
rd (SAB). 
National 
Rareness Wee 
it. 19-24 is held 
te by BACC1 
pnsored by ti 
isk Force on 
B. Northwesl 
I Awareness 
tie Fair Week 
ne week as N 
Mayor Jo< 
week of Q 
areness Wei 
isiana Govei 
declared Oc 
use Awarene 
Schedule! 



DAN MEDLIN 
Writer 

Student 
>wnie points 
nth should co 
the annual I\ 
Wies. 

Titled "T 
age," the 3 
oric homes ai 
e River couni 
is set for thi 

Tour attr< 
s as Magnoli; 
u Fort Plant 
House (II 
iquier House 
!use(1776). 
The two- 
three section 
place in th 
ctofNatchi 
es located I 
The Cane Ri 



29, 1987, 



3Q8ER 6,1967 



:■:■:•:•>:;:;:::;.:-»:.:-:-:.:>;.:■:•■ 



111! 



VOL 76 HO, 10 



8 



time, the tele 
iphone line! 
alties charge 
atabase beinj 
ange from 



CURR 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UN1VERS1IY OF LOUISIANA 





NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 7 1497 



search < 



3GA recalls Mr. and Miss NSU nominations 



x>rdinator ol 
:son Library,? 
to prepare a 

g Mac results! GREG KENDRICK who determined the ballot? The letter 

" or also questioned the fact that Jerome 

ned in data-; Th e Student Government As- Cox, SGA comissioner of elections 
inar in Dallasfi ation voted to recall the Mr. and and Mr. NSU nominee, served on the 
received bothr 5 NSU nominations Monday board. 

nd a master's* 04 after a contestation was submit- The letter was submitted last 

r ormationsci-f < l uestiomn 8 tt,e P rC)Cedureofbal " Tuesday to Fred Fulton, director of 
ity of Texas|P rocessin 8- Student Life, after a ballot was posted 

oftheLouisiJ ^ e motion to recall the Mr. by the SGA election commitee. The 
on's Online ji Miss NSU nominations but main- ballot indicated only four men quali- 
.g6 jn the State Fair Court ballots was fied for the Mr. NSU nomination bal- 

ls concerninej ce P ted after bein S revoted on the lot— Jerome Cox, Steve Horton, John 
ches, contact! 01 tnree times. The first two times Kulakowski and Jimmie McCormick. 
?r of Watson^ motion failed because it was not A new ballot was issued last 

ecific in its demands. Friday which stated eight nominees 

The debate was sparked by a 
r of contestation submitted by 
Chairman Dave DeCuir and 
Fair Chairwoman Sheila De- 
In the letter, both SGA members 
ioned the ballot processing for 



ballot. The nominees are Kim Antee, was selfish and he wanted to be the 

Caprice Brown, Debbie Cable, Marti only black on that (Mr. NSU) ballot." 

Elkins, Ruth Eitel, Kim Hebert, Rachel Both DeCuir and Delozia ques- 

Heider, Monte Johnson, Yvette Jor- tioned the fact that many campus 

don, Marcia McLamore and Karen organizations did not receive voting 

Sparks. forms to vote for a Mr. NSU nominee. 

DeCuir said he is concerned Some groups who did submit nomi- 

that Cox misplaced ballots or tallied nation f °rms were considered invalid 



for Mr. NSU — Jerome Cox, Dave 
DeCuir, Dewey Granger, Steve Hor- 
ton, John Kulakowski, Jimmie 
McCormick, Grady Norton and Todd 
Sterling. 



The election board also in- 
\. and Miss NSU. The letter asked if creased the number of Miss NSU 
) election board met, and if it did, nominees, from five to 11 on the new 



ballots before the election committee 
could meet. "I think he had counted 
the ballots first before he had pre- 
sented them to the election commit- 
tee," DeCuir said. "I don't think it 
would hurt it we recalled the elec- 
tion." 

Delozia said she feels ballots 
were either misplaced or mishandled 
by Jerome Cox between the time the 
ballots were actually collected and the 
time they were tallied by the election 
committee. "There are too many ques- 
tions about how Cox processed elec- 
tion ballots," Delozia said, "I think he 



Awareness week slated 



MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
Iff Writer 

"Don't Abuse to be Amused" 
(he theme of Northwestern' s Alco- 
1 Awareness Week to be held Oct. 
46. 

The activity-filled week is 
ing co-sponsored by Boost Alcohol 
msciousness Concerning the 
alth of University Students (BAC- 
1US), Student Government Asso- 
tion (SGA) and Student Activities 
ird (SAB). 

National Collegiate Alcohol 
rareness Week (N6AAW) set for 
1. 19-24 is held on campuses nation- 
de by BACCHUS chapters and is 
)nsored by the Inner-Association 
5k Force on Campus Alcohol Is- 
s. Northwestern is holding Alco- 
. Awareness Week early due to 
te Fair Week being scheduled the 
me week as NCAAW. 

Mayor Joe Sampite will declare 
week of Oct. 12-19 as Alcohol 
areness Week for Natchitoches, 
uisiana Governor Edwin Edwards 
s declared Oct. 15-17 as Substance 
use Awareness Week for the state. 
Scheduled activities for the 



week at Northwestern include an al- 
cohol awareness game show to be 
held 6:30 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday in the Student Union lobby. 
The game show, entitled "Alcohol 
Jeopardy," will consist of teams of 
four. Players will be asked trivia ques- 
tions concerning alcohol. Game show 
finals will be held Thursday and will 
be followed by a talent show in the 
ballroom. 

A mocktail competition will be 
held Wednesday night in the Student 
Union lobby. Participants will create 
non-alcoholic frozen drinks. Accord- 
ing to alcohol awareness week chair- 
man, Ericka Montgomery, outlets, ice 
and water will be provided for the 
mocktail competition. ' However, 
competitors must supply their own 
ingredients. 

The mocktails will be judged 
and SAB will serve free samples of the 
winning mocktail Thursday night 
during the game show finals and the 
talent show. A poster contest will also 
be held and the winners announced 
Thursday. 

Cash prizes will be awarded 
for the game show, mocktail competi- 



tion and the poster contest. A rotating 
plaque will be awarded to the club or 
organization with the most participa- 
tion during the week. Students or 
groups wishing to participate must 
complete an entry blank. Applica- 
tions are available from the BAC- 
CHUS or Student Activities offices in 
the Student Union. 

In addition to activities, speak- 
ers will lecture on alcohol awareness 
throughout the week. Speakers in- 
clude Rudolph Hamilton and Eric 
Barrilleaux. Hamilton, who was a 
prisoner for 17 years, started an alco- 
hol awareness program within the 
prison system. Barrilleaux is from 
Charter Counseling in Shreveport. 

Other speakers include the 
Louisiana State Police on driving 
while intoxicated (DWI), District At- 
torney Mike Henry on the legal drink- 
ing age in Louisiana and several sup- 
port group# on the importance of 
support groups and the purpose of 
the groups. 

See awareness 
page 5 



istoric homes to open doors 



I DAN MEDLIN 
[Writer 

Students wanting to win 
pwnie points with parents this 
bnth should consider inviting them 
Ithe annual Natchitoches Tour of 
imes. 

Titled "The Natchitoches Pil- 
Image," the 33rd annual tour of 
[toric homes and plantations in the 
ne River country and Natchitoches 
i is set for this Saturday and Sun- 
Tour attractions include such 
fes as Magnolia Plantation (1830' s), 
Vu Fort Plantation House (1790), 
House (1830's) Prudhomme- 
uquier House (1800) and the Wells 
|use (1776). 

The two-day tour is broken 
) three sections. The town tour will 
place in the historic landmark 
Jtrict of Natchitoches and will cover 
nes located throughout the dis- 
t. The Cane River country tour will 



cover homes located in Cane River 
country surrounding Natchitoches. 
The candlelight tour is a special walk- 
ing night tour. 

All tour tickets are good for a 
special lagniappe tour in town. The 
lagniappe tour includes Fort St. Jean 
Baptiste (1715), Bishop Martin Mu- 
seum (1853), Immaculate Conception 
Catholic Church (1856) and Trinity 
Episcopal Church (1857). 

Headquarters for the tour is 
the historic Lemee House (1 830) at 31 
Jefferson Street. Hours of operation 
are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. 

Tour times are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
both days. A special evening candle- 
light tour is scheduled for Saturday, 7 
to 10 p.m. The candlelight tour is a 
walk through the historic district with 
refreshments available at the last stop. 

Tickets are available at the 
Chamber of Commerce Office, 781 
Front Street, or at Melrose Plantation 
and Bayou Folk Museum. 

Tour prices for students are $5 



each for the town and Cane River 
country tours and $4 for candelight 
tour. Individual house tours are $2. 

Adult prices are $10 each for 
town and Cane River country tours 
and $7 for Saturday's candelight tour. 
Individual house tour for adults is $4. 
Children's town tour and Cane River 
country tour is $3 and the candelight 
tour is $2. Children's individual 
house tours are $1. 

Much of the early history of 
the Louisiana purchase was made 
right here in our back yard. Those 
taking the tour may catch the spirit of 
an age not too distant and still in the 
hearts of many area residents. 

The Natchitoches Pilgrimage 
is presented by the Association for the 
Preservation of Historic Natchitoches 
and has been listed several times on 
national lists of U.S. historic attrac- 
tions. 

For more information on the 
tour or tickets, call 352-8072. 





Natchitoches Parish Fire Department answers a false alarm at Sabine Hall 7 pJn. Sunday. 



by the election committee. 

In an interview, Cox said the 
reason he had only posted four mem- 
bers on the original Mr. NSU ballot 
was because of a technicality in the 
new SGA election code. 

According to Cox, the code 
states the minimal amount of nomi- 
nees to appear on the ballot is four. 
The maximum number of nominees is 
nine. The nominees are posted from 
the most number of votes to the least. 
The code states if a tie exists among 
nominees, their names may be placed 
on the ballot as long as they do not 



exceed the number of 12. 

"When we first tallied the bal- 
lots, we had a tie between nine 
people," Cox said. 'This placed us 
over the 12 person ceiling. After the 
contestation was submitted we went 
back and evaluated the nominees and 
discovered that several people were 
not qualified for the Mr. NSU posi- 
tion. After we weeded these people 
out the nominations dropped to 
nine." 

The ballot dropped to eight 
when SGA president Johnny Cox 
decided to withdraw from the nomi- 
nation. 

"In the interest to keep the elec- 
tion balanced between the men and 
the women, I decided to increase the 
number of nominees for Miss NSU," 
Jerome Cox said of the increase in 
Miss NSU nominees. 

In regard to the fact that Cox, a 



nominees served n the election 
board, Cox said he had no idea he was 
going to be nominated and it was still 
his legal right to serve on the commit- 
tee. T was not aware of being on bal- 
lot," Cox said. "I have done this more 
than once. The same thing happened 
to me last year and I resigned. I feel I 
don't have to do this." 

After the letter of contestation 
was submitted to Fulton, the Depart- 
ment of Student Life obtained all 
nomination ballots from the election 
committee and began an investiga- 
tion into the matter. 

"We have the nomination bal- 
lots and are i n the process of verifying 
that the ballots are correct," Fulton 

See nominations 
page 5 



KNWD fundraiser successful 




Noop and the Rabbit face Shamu in a challenging game of Monopoly during KNWD's 
fundraiser atop Turpin Stadium last week. 



KNWD's Bill 'The Rabbit" Sch- 
aiederand Jay "Noop" Mitchell came 
3own from atop Turpin Stadium 953 
i.m. Sunday to end the station's 
"Stairway to Heaven '87" fundraiser. 

According to Marshall Carll, 
station manager, about $1,400 was 
raised during the three-day fun- 
draiser. KNWD-FM, 91.7, is the stu- 
dent-owned and operated campus 
radio station. 

The station held a marathon 
remote broadcast from the top of 
Turpin Stadium beginning last Thurs- 
day morning. The fundraiser was 
aired over KNWD and broadcasted 
over the campus. The broadcast could 
be heard as far away as Rapides and 
Sabine dorms. 



During the broadcast, person- 
nel sold raffle tickets to students 
guessing when the broadcast would 
end. The tickets also made students 
eligible for 50 prizes given away dur- 
ing the broadcast. 

According to Carll, four stu- 
dents guessed the correct time for the 
broadcast to end. Of the four, one 
name was drawn by Tommy 
Whitehead, Student Media Advisor, 
as the winner. Rodney Kitterlin was 
declared the winner of the raffle. Kit- 
terlin was awarded 5109.17. Randy 
Vickers, Jerome Cox and John Bon- 
nette will be awarded a consolation 
prize as runners-up. 

A day-by-day breakdown of the 
three-day event showed Friday to be 



the most profitable day with abou'. 
S520 raised. On Saturday $310 was 
raised with $180 being raised Thurs- 
day. Business sponsors chipped in 
about $500 to bring the total to 
roughly $1,400 after expenses. 

Carll said funds raised during 
the remote broadcast will be used to 
purchase new equipment and to re- 
pair exisiting equipment. At the top of 
the list is to purchase new records, 
record shelves, record cleaner and 
new needles. 

Other projects include repairing 
thecart machines in the studio and the 
production room , purchasing tele- 
phones, microphones and turntable 
preamps for the new home of KNWD 
in South Hall. 



NSU student relates Stark experience 



By LISA DARDEN 
Managing Editor 

Eddie Manint, a freshman from 
Jefferson Parish, finds life at North- 
western relaxed compared to his life 
aboard the U.S.S. Stark 

Manint, 24, served four years of 
active duty in the U.S. Navy before 
coming to school at Northwestern. 
Two of those years he spent aboard 
the guided missile frigate Stark. 

The Stark was struck by missiles 
fired from an Iraqui fighter plane May 
17, 1987, in the Persian Gulf. Of the 
more than 230 crewman aboard, 37 
Americans died from the attack. 

Although he finished his tour of 
duty aboard the Stark in May of 1984, 
Manint said he felt a variety of emo- 
tions upon hearing news of the attack. 
He first heard about the attack from 
his mother. 

"At first I felt relieved I wasn't 
on board at the time," Manint said. "I 
then began to worry about the crew 
and wondered if I knew anyone on 
board." 

Manint knew one crew member 
and spotted him on a news telecast 
two days after the attack. "I saw Mike 
(O'Keefe) on TV being interviewed 
and knew he was alive. Once they 
released the names of the dead I saw 
that there was no one else on board I 
knew," he said. 

Once the initial shock wore off, 
Manint said he felt guilty. "It shook 
me up. It made me feel guilty because 
they were going through all this stuff 
and I was sitting at home." 

Manint, who is currently serv- 
ing two years of inactive duty, will 



receive an honorable discharge this 
December. He served as an E-3 hospi- 
talman aboard the Stark where he was 
responsible for maintaining medical 
and dental records, giving inocula- 
tions and answering sick calls. At 
Northwestern he is majoring in physi- 
cal education. 

While on board the Stark, 
Manint traveled to the Panama Canal, 
Bahamas, Virgin Islands, New York, 
San Francisco, Puerto Rico and Cuba. 
The crew was also posted along the 
coast of Honduras during the El Sal- 
vador and Nicaragua conflicts. "We 
were there to let them know we were 
backing them up," he said. 

The crew held battle training 
twice a year in Guantanamo Bay, 
Cuba. "We were trained in nuclear 
biological, chemical warfare and went 
through specific training sessions 
such as fires and leaks," Manint said. 
While in Cuba, crewmembers were 
not allowed to leave the ship. The 
Naval base was separated from Cuba 
by a large fence and a section covered 
with land mines. The crew also con- 
ducted training and weapons testing 
exercises in the Carribean and Atlan- 
tic. 

The Stark, Manint explained, is 
440 feet long and carries about 300 
people. The ship primarily protects 
and escorts aircraft carriers. The frig- 
ate is responsible for either intercept- 
ing missiles or getting hit. The frigate 
can travel about 32 knots or 50 mph. 

Compared to Navy life, dorm 
life is almost luxurious, Manint who 
lives in west Rapides said. Aboard the 
Stark, men were berthed in common 
sleeping areas and bunks were 



stacked three high. The men with the 
highest rank had the lowest bunks 
while those with the lowest rank had 
to climb up to sleep each night. 

While out at sea, the men 
worked 12-hour days. During their 
f r ee time they amused themselves in 
tl e library, the weight room or by 
playing basketball and volleyball in 
the helicopter hangar. "It was rough 
playing ball while at sea," Manint 
said. The men also amused them- 
selves by fishing while at port. 

"I enjoyed the ship. I got to see a 
lot of places," Manint said of his Navy 
experience. 

The one area, Manint said, in 
which the Navy outdoes Northwest- 
ern is food service. "The Navy has 
better food," Manint said shyly. 




Page 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



October 6, 1 987 



ELECTIONS 






Brenda Burns 



Frankie Campbell 



Kirsten Gernhauser 



Nan Goss 





Yvette Jordan 



Kelley Kyle 




Angela Lacour 



Darcy LeBlanc 



Shwu-Fen Lee 



Tracy Lee 





«*& *t* **V» : 





Andrea Madison 



Pam Perkins 



Sonya Rigaud 



Mary Simmons 



Melissa Smith 



Melody Smith 



POTPOURRI ORGANIZATION PHOTOS 


• 

POTPOURRI ORGANIZATION/ 


POTPOURRI ORGANIZATION/ 


POTPOURRI ORGANIZATIONS/ 




GREEK SCHEDULE 


GREEKS PICTURE SCHEDULE 


GREEK SCHEDULE 


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1987 


WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 14, 1987 


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1987 




ALUMNI CENTER 


CHAPLIN'S LAKE - ACROSS 


COLUMMS 






FROM COLISIUM 




4:00 


ACS 




4:00 PANHELLENIC 


4:05 


ALPHA BETA ALPHA 


4:00 PERIAKTOI 


4:05 PHI MU 


4:10 


ALPHA ETA RHO 


4:05 PHI ALPHA THETA 


4:15 SIGMA KAPPA 


4:15 


ALPHA KAPPA DELTA 


4:10 PHI EPSILON KAPPA 


4:25 SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA 


4:25 


ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA 


4:15 PHI KAPPA PHI 


4:35 IFC 


4:30 


ANTHROPOLOGY CLUB 


4:20 PHI MU ALPHA SINFONIA 


4:40 KAPPA ALPHA PSI 


4:35 


ANIMAL HEALTH TECH. 


4:25 LE CERCLE FRANCAIS 


4:50 PHI BETA SIGMA 




ASSOC. 


4:30 PRSSA 


4:55 ALPHA PHI ALPHA 


4:40 


ASSOC. FOR STUDENTS 


4:35 PHI BETA LAMBDA 


5:00 OMEGA PSI PHI 




ATRISTS 


4:40 PSYCHOLOGY CLUB 


5:05 KAPPA ALPHA ORDER 


4:45 


BSU 


4:45 PSI CHI 


5:15 KAPPA SIGMA 


4:50 


BETA BETA BETA 


4:50 RANGER TEAM 


5:25 SIGMA TAU GAMMA 


4:55 


BETA GAMMA PSI 


4:55 RIFLE TEAM 


5:30 TAU KAPPA EPSILON 


5:00 


BLACK KNIGHTS 


5:00 SAM 


5:40 THETA CHI 


5:05 


COUNCIL OF YE REVELS 


5:05 SIGMA ALPHA IOTA 




5:10 


CHURCH OF CHRIST 


5:10 SIGMA DELTA CHI 






DEVOTIONAL 


5:15 SNA 




5:15 


CORPS OF CADETS 


5:20 SLAF 




5:20 


ASSOC. OF THE US ARMY 


5:25 STUDENT DIETETICS ASSOC. 




5:25 


DELTA PSI KAPPA 


5:30 STUDENT PERSONAL 




5:30 


GERMAN CLUB 


ASSOC. 




5:35 


DPMA 


5:35 NSU IMAGES 




5:40 


FWCC 


5:40 INTERNATIONAL STUDENT 




5:45 


GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY 


CLUB 




5:50 


LOUISIANA HOME 


5:45 YOUNG DEMOCRATS 






ECONOMICS ASSOC. 


5:50 SAB 




5:55 


IOTA LAMBDA SIGMA 


5:55 SGA 




6:00 


PHI ETA SIGMA 


6:00 PAN-HELLENIC 




6:05 


MICROBIOLOGY CLUB 


6:05 ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA 




6:10 


NACUS 


6:10 DELTA SIGMA THETA 




6:15 


NCAS 


6:15 ZETA PHI BETA 




6:20 


NAIT 


6:20 PURPLE JACKETS 




6:25 


KAPPA OMICRON PHI 


6:25 BLUE KEY 




6:30 


ORENTEERING CLUB 


6:30 BACCHUS 




6:35 


WESLEY FOUNDATION 






6:40 


PENTECOSTAL FELLOWSHIP 






6:45 


FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN 








STUDENTS 






6:50 


IEEE 







DP Junction 

Juniors - Petites - Misses 



Dixie Plaza 
Shopping Center 




f 6, 1987 



October 6, 1 987 
EDITORIAL 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



INegative editorials, positive results 




ftood 



ee 



ie Plaza 
)ing Center 

tes 



By LISA DARDEN 
Managing Editor 

Well, here we go again. Another 
exciting episode of "As the SGA 
Turns." 

Although I have been given 
more than ample opportunity to at- 
tack the Student Government, I will 
instead discuss another topic which is 
related to SGA. 

It seems that we (those of us 
brave enough to write editorials) at 
the Current Sauce have been accused 
of taking a negative stand on certain 
issues and creating bad morale 
among the student body. 

HA! I'm hooting at that one. 



Bernstein accused of damaging the check the stories and soiites before 
morale of the United States when they printing them and nevenun a story 
made public the Watergate scandal? based merely on heresa> 
And how about the Iran Contra Scan- I truly believe oj editorials 
dais? Journalists covering and uncov- have a purpose. They seve to inform 
ering these topics weren't accused of the student body of wha's potentially 
bringing the country to its knees. In- wrong and what cod use some 
stead these journalists were enlight- improvement. What I blieve is mor- 
ening the public on some important ally damaging to the sJdent body is 
topics which affect their daily life (just that these things are hppening (over 
as SGA actions affect our life here at and over and over aain) by those 
Northwestern). representing the stu^nts. The stu- 

Since a college is considered a dents are discouragedJy the constant 
training ground for future leaders and contestation of elecuns and petty 
productive members of the American achievements. I don'oelieve our edi- 
society in their particular fields, I torials are damaginjbut rather that 
would think we should want students the actions of the representative 
to learn how to take an active part in 



group are damaging 

These people need to take off their society— all aspects of society. We I said it once bc'»re but I guess it 

rose-colored glasses and take a real should want students to be able to needs to be said ag.h. Last spring I 
look at the situation at hand. Yes, we discern between right and wrong and quoted Melvin Merier, a journalism 
have written some strong editorials know when people representing 
about Student Government and stu- them are not representing them as 




9 dent life at Northwestern. However, they deem necessary. We should want 
1 these so called 



professor at Columia University, as 
saying one of the rnny purposes of 
the news media is ogive voice to all 
groups, not solely tn>se who hold the 
power. This voice srves as a system 
of checks and balaves for the power. 
Mercher stated, "fcpression and ig- 
norance are the onsequences of un- 
checked power." 

If we're so herested in educat- 



damaging" editorials to produce students who know when 
have actually brought about some to speak out when they feel they are 
positive changes. being wronged — not apathetic stu- 

For example: Following an edi- dents who sit back oblivious to the 
torial in the Sauce, Student Govern- ways of the world, 
ment opted to discard some ridicu- I could understand being ac- 

lous bylaws which would have ere- cused of damaging the morale if I was 
ated more problems than they would camped out in front of Rapides Hall ing students at Nrthwestern, let us 
have prevented. The SGA also finally each night spying on the Cox brothers truly educate then May they not only 
unplugged the message board in the trying to find out if they were leading 
cafeteria which was six months be- illicit sex lives. I could understand if 
hind. Plus, after an editorial appeared the Current Sauce practiced yellow 
in the Current Sauce this summer, a journalism and ran a publication simi- 
shuttlevan was obtained for students lar to the National Enquirer (Lord 
needing a ride to the Recreation knows we could certainly have a hay 
Complex day with the gossip at Northwestern). 

On a national yet somehow re- However, we here at the Current Sauce 
lated level, were Woodward and try to represent both sides equally. We 

SGA crash diet plan revealed 



learn from classroms and textbooks 
but also from tic college experience 
itself. Let the sidents be informed 
and capable o thinking for them- 
selves. 

Cast aside those rose-colored 
glasses and relze that everything's 
not coming uproses. 




By GREG KENDRICK 
Editor 

The Greg Kendrick weight 
ontrol program is here! Now even 
ur university can lose that listless, 
bitimidating fat which slows down 
bur functionability and taints our 
reputation, all without the means of 
lieting, drugs or exercise. It's easy 
|nd has no detrimental effects. All we 
avc to do is get rid of the commis- 
ioner of elections on the SGA. 

That may sound like a rash 
jtatemcnt to some students. How- 
er, I believe the actions of Jerome 
ox speak for themselves. I have 
iven up trying to count the number 
technicalities that have snarled the 
A eleetorial processes under this 
dividual's regime. 

The major drawback of our 
mmissioner of elections is his fail- 
re to communicate. He does not dis- 
kirse the information of an election in 
I ime or to the proper sources. An ideal 
Itxample is the homecoming court 
I Sections which were held — twice — a 
I ew weeks back. Why twice? Because 
I erome did not maintain communica- 
I jon with our ShrevepOrt campus and 
I ailed to place one of the women on 
I he ballot. This simple slip of commu- 
I lication may sound trivial but add the 
Bpect that about half the students at 
e Shreveport campus maintain a 
11-day practicum away from cam- 
jus on the same day that Cox posts the 
Sections (Monday), and we have 
tential for contestation. 



If the students on the Shre- 
veport campus are beginning to feel 
like they are being kept in the dark by 
Cox, get ready for a full eclipse. Our 
commissioner of elections went ahead 
and conducted elections yesterday at 
the Shreveport campus regardless of 
the presence of a stated contestation 
and the rumor of a -possible -recall. I 
know he was aware of the contesta- 
tion and he had ample time to call and 
cancel it. 

I can see a valid reason why he 
didn't make an effort to call the elec- 
tion off in Shreveport, he didn't have 
the means to publicize it in the first 
place. A clause in the SGA election 
code states the commissioner of elec- 
tions is responsible for providing 

publicity for every election in a man- 
ner decided by the election board. 
Will the election board please en- 
lighten me on what they consider a 
solid means of publicity for an elec- 
tion. Apparantly it isn't the Current 
Sauce. 

No wait I take that back. 

The means of election publicity is not 
the Current Sauce until it is Friday 
night publication deadline and about 
20 pictures, along with statements, are 
forced in the office mail slot with the 
request to run in the next Tuesday's 
publication. So has been my situation 
for the last two elections. I imagine 
there are not too many out there who 
have the perpetual dilemma of decid- 
ing whether to run eight pages or six 
pages each issue because of the insta- 



bility of a post J election date. To give 
you a taste: it f 1:30 in the morning, I 
dropped myjght page layout after 
the SGA merfng and I am finally 
pounding ou ny editorial after com- 
posing filler io patch up my paper 
when I shoui be home in bed count- 
ing contestaons. 

I denot care if the SGA Su- 
preme Courdiscovers any dirt about 
the last elction or not. I feel that 
impeachmet or resignation is inev- 
itable for or commissioner of elec- 
tions. Cox hs dug his own grave. He 
has angere too many students, in- 
cluding theaucus that was probably 
responsibltfor him winning the posi- 
tion. The fct that Cox, the commis- 
sioner of eictions, placed himself on 
the originf ballot against three pre- 
dominant nembers of the student 
body who re all caucasion has some 
rather dar;erous implications in it- 
self. To aote SGA representative 
Sheila Delcia: "I think it was selfish... 
he wantedo be the only black on that 
ballot." 

1 cbnot consider this a racist 
issue but i ts obvious what the out- 
come of th» Section would have been 
had the ordinal ballot endured. 

I arinire both Dave DeCuir 
and SheilaEelozia, who are members 
of the SGA for actually recognizing 
the wronj committed within their 
organizatin and bringing to the at- 
tention to he public. Now it is our 
responsiblty as the public to make 
damn sun that this crap does not 
happen ajan. 



WRITE A LETTER 



TO THE EDITOR! 



Tue DiPFeKff.';: One SeceMr. C*m tic*?; 

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SGA amazes writers 



Dear Editor, 

Since my arrival at Northwest- 
ern, I have been amazed and 
dumbfounded at the number of con- 
tested elections held by the Student 
Government Association. For a gTOup 
that is supposed to be knowledgable 
about elections and representing the 
student body as a whole, they have 
instead proven themselves only to be 
a pseudo-council, an imitation of 
what a real Student Government 
should be like. 

After the excellent effort in 
recruiting new students and intro- 
ducing better services, upgraded pro- 
grams and more qualified faculty 
members to Northwestern, I see only 
that the SGA is canceling out any good 
these changes might bring. It seems 
that this year we have stressed the fact 
that we are getting back on our feet. 
We are finally ready to be compared 
with other collegeson a national level. 
Yet when the incoming students ar- 
rived here with great expectations, 
they found that their very own Stu- 



dent Government could not handle 
even the simplest elections such as 
Mr. and Miss NSU, State Fair and 
Homecoming. 

I believe the student body 
should become more aware of who 
exactly is running for office and what 
their qualifications are. In a school the 
size of Northwestern, we should be 
able to find more than enough stu- 
dents capable of handling the job of 
representing students efficiently and 
fairly. Also, getting the right man or 
woman into office is as important as 
getting them to run for the position. It 
is the responsibilty of each student to 
take the time to vote for the correct 
representative and voice his or her 
own opinion. 

The SGA was founded to rep- 
resent us, the students of Northwest- 
ern, and to carry out our views and 
wishes. I certainly hope that our Stu- 
dent Government is not a representa- 
tion of America's future political sys- 
tem. 

Mary Miller 
& Michelle Weego 




Activities conference 
learning experience 



Dear Editor, 

If I had to entitle this letter it 
would be "Thanks to Think." First my 
thanks go to the six hard working 
students that attended the Regional 
National Association of Campus Ac- 
tivities (NACA) conference. These 
students were Todd Sterling, Rachel 
Heider, Mary Miller, Joe Robertson, 
Kelley Kyle and Charlotte Rush. 

Let me explain what we do at a 
NACA conference. We start the day 
around 8 a.m. attending education 
sessions until lunch. After lunch we 
participate in the exhibit hall. Around 
2 p.m. the entertainment showcases 
start and we observe them until we 
break for supper. We finish the eve- 
ning with dance showcases running 
until 1 a.m. So as you can tell, we have 
a busy schedule to follow filled with 
work, learning and fun. We accom- 
plished a good deal at NACA, lining 
upentertainment for the rest of the fall 
semester and some things for the 
spring. 

The learning part of the confer- 



ence is the "thinking" aspect I want to 
stress. In one of my cd-sessions (edu- 
cation sessions) we discussed campus 
involvement. I constantly hear at 
Northwestern, "We don't have any- 
thing to do." This simply isn't true. 
There are activities sponsored by the 
Student Activities Board, Panhellenic, 
IFC, campus groups as well as dormi- 
tory and intramural organizations. 
But, the students must meet us half- 
way by coming out and getting in- 
volved. For example a student came 
bymyofficeand asked meiftherewas 
anything she could do to help me or 
SAB with homecoming. She met me 
more than half way. 

I guess what I want to say is it is 
up to you and you as a student have 
the option to participate or not. Re- 
member this: you might be missing a 
lot of fun, so take that step and get 
involved. 

Think about it! 

Marjorie Poss 
Program Adviser 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 



LISA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 



KIRK COPEIAND 

Sports Editor 



MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
DAMATIA GIPSON 
SONYA RIGAUD 

Staff Writers 



ALLEN EVANS 

Advertising Manager 



EDD LEE 

Circulation/Distribution 



CHARLOTTE RUSH 

Photo Ediltor 



TEDRIS SMITH 
WILLIAM FRANCO 

Photographers 



ROBERT BROWN 

Layout Editor 



TOM WHITEHEAD 

Adviser 



IEN1 QUOTES 




Compared to home, what is the biggest inconvenience 
of living in the dorm? 






lonyaRigaud Todd Sterling Michle Lavergne 

[2, Public Relations 4-1, Journalism 4-1, 2>ology 

■organ City Baton Rouge Opelusas 

"J miss having my dogs, Buffy "The biggest inconveniences "Compared to home, the big- 

hd Gizmo, with me. I also miss my are not having a bathroom in your gest iiconvenience of living in the 

i Kama's cooking-" room and the visitation rules." dormas the community bathrooms." 



Geovanny Canizares 
1-1/ Pre-Professional 
Shreveport 

"My major complaint is our 
limited visitation policy. Our visita- 
tion hours should be extended." 




J 



Kimberly Antee 
4-1, Business Adm. 
Inglewood, Ca 

"The washing machines eat 
my clothes. Not to mention after 
paying 50 cents to dry my clothes, I 
still have to hang them all over my 
room to dry." 



The Current Sauce is 
published weekly during the foH 
and spring semesters by the stu- 
dents of Northwestern State Uni- 
versity of Louisiana. It is not asso 
dated with any of the 
University's cepartmenfs and is 
financed independently. 

The Current Sauce ts 
based in the Office of Student 
Publications located in Kyser 
Hall. The office of the editorial 
staff is 225H. telephone (318) 
357-6456. The adviser's office is 
103 Kyser Ha8. telephone 357- 
5213 

The mailing address for 
the Current Sauce is P.O. Box 
5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 
71497. 

Ail correspondence, in- 
cluding letters to the editor is 
welcome Material submitted 
for consideration must be 
mailed to above address or 
brought to the office 

Tho deadline for all ad- 
vertising and ccoy is fnday by 3 
p.m. inclusion of any and a!) 
material is left to the discret.cn of 
the editor. 

Letters to the editor 
should be typed (double- 
spaced) signed, and should in- 
clude a teiepnene number 
where the writer can be 
reached. No anonymous letters 
will be printed. 

Current sauce subscrip- 
tion rates are S 1 1 per academic 
year (27 issues) or S6 per 
semes>er (14 issues) The paper is 
entered os second-class mail at 
Natchitoches. LA. The USPS 
number is 140-660 



Page 4 



CURRENT SAJCE 



i ucTooero, \ K m 



SPORTS 



'Hail Mary' on game 's final play wins it 



Octobe 
NEW 

continued f 



Indians perform rain dance on Demon Homecoming parade, 33-3f° 



By KIRK COPELAND 
Sports Editor 

Set your time machine for the 
middle 1970's in Bloomington, 
Minnesota.lt is an icy cold, late De- 
cember day and the Minnesota Vi- 
kings are just 30 seconds away from a 
victory over the Dallas Cowboys in 
the first round of the playoffs. 

Cowboy field general Roger 
Staubach takes the snap, fades to pass, 
pumps and fires in the general vicin- 
ity of Drew Pearson deep downfield, 
but, alas, the ball falls incomplete, 
batted away by a Viking defender. 

But wait! Pearson somehow 
latches onto the ball and slides into the 
end zone for the game-winning 
touchdown. Thus, the "Hail Mary" 
pass was born. 

Northeast Louisiana's Indians 
took a page out of that book Saturday 
to beat Northwestern State by a score 
of 33-31. 

The only d if f erence in the no w- 
famous Cowboy bomb and the now- 
infamous Indian pass is the cast of 
characters. Playing the roles of an- 
tagonists this time were Stan Humph- 

Demons improve 
in SW Louisiana 
Cross Country 
Invitational 



By TOM WANCHO 

Sports Information 

For the first time this year, 
Northwestern State had a perform- 
ance that put coach Steve Thomas in a 
good mood afterwards. 

"We ran much better as a team 
and closed the gap on both McNeese 
and USL,"Thomas said after the 
Demons took fifth place in last 
Friday's Southwestern Louisiana In- 
vitational. The NSU women's contin- 
gent faired even better, taking home a 
fourth place finish. 

Thomas, who was sporting 
fangs after the Demons lack of per- 
formance at the McNeese State Invita- 
tional two Mondays ago, said that 
senior Ronald Wilkins "ran the best 
race of his college career and finished 
eighth overall. Gerald Semien also 
finished second for us for the second 
straight time and has really improved 
since we started. Ricky Carroll, who 
had usually been our sixth, seventh, 
and eighth place finisher, moved up 
to fifth at USL." 

Closing in on McNeese State is 
a significant stride for the Demons as 
the Cowboys are expected to contend 
for the Southland Conference cham- 
pionship in November. McNeese 
blew the Demons away two weeks 
ago by 58 points. On Friday, the 
Demons were within nine points at 
the finish line. 

The Lady Demons also seem to 
be rounding into shape under the 
guidance of Mark Molesworth. 
"When our girls who are finishing 
third, fourth, and fifth start raising 
their finish, we'll move up some in the 
team standings," Molesworth said. 
"And I feel that they will move up. 
These are girls who have never ran 
cross country before. Really, what 
they're doing now has been outstand- 
ing. Of course, Vicki (Robarge) and 
Kate (Christmas) have been doing a 
commendable job all year." 

NSU finished ahead of Louisi- 
ana Tech, a team that had come out on 
top of the Lady Demons in an earlier 
dual meet this year. Robarge finished 
first among all NSU finishers with a 
20:14 time over the three mile course. 



ries, the NLU quarterback, and his co- 
conspirator Jackie Harris, the receiver 
on the play. 

NLU took the ball at their own 
13 after the Demons were stopped 
inches short of a first down on fourth 
and three with 16 seconds to play in 
the game. Humphries fired a 39 yard 
pass to Jeff Steele, then threw the ball 
out of bounds to stop the clock with a 
mere one tick left on the clock. 

Then came a play the Indians 
call "Victory 99". Humphries threw a 
long pass into the end zone where it 
was tipped by no less than four De- 
mons into the waiting arms of Harris, 
who was on the ground in the end 
zone. The crowd of 13,600, a Turpin 
Stadium record, watched the play in 
disbelief. 

NLU's miracle not only rained 
on Northwestern's Homecoming pa- 
rade but also negated an incredibly 
courageous performance by Demon 
backup quarterback Scott Stoker, who 
led the Demons in rushing (48 yards) 
and passing (198 yards, 13 of 17). 
Stoker time and time again thrust his 
body, all five-foot-eight, 157 pounds 
worth of it, into the Northeast line to 



pickup crucial yardage, and each time 
he got up for more. 

The Indians' jumped on top 
first, taking the opening kickoff and 
marching downfield to set up a touch- 
down catch by Kenneth Johnson from 
one yard out. Teddy Garcia added the 
first of his five successful kicks on the 
day to give the Tribe a 7-0 lead. 

Northwestern came back with 
a one yarder of its own when John 
Stephens capped a drive with a 
plunge from a yard out. Keith Hod- 
nett, who had his best game of the year 
in terms of efficiency, booted the extra 
point through to knot the score at 
seven. 

Northeast came back with 17 
straight points in the second stanza on 
scoring plays by Mike Manzullo on a 
12 yard pass play, Tommy Minvielle 
on an 11 yard scamper, and Garcia on 
a 55 yard field goal. Stephens got NSU 
back in the game with another one 
yard run, but Garcia kicked a 17 yard 
field goal to end the first half scoring 
with the Indians up 27-14. 

The Demons opened up the 
second half with the much-publicized 
big play, this time a 40 yard bomb 




Back of All Trades 

Scott Stoker breaks into the Indian secondary in Saturday's 33-31 loss. 



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from Stoer to "Mr. Excitement", 
otherwiseknown as Floyd Turner, 
drawing te Men in Purple to within 
six at 27-2: 

At tis point the Demon Big 
Guys on Dfense took over and held 
the Indianso just 40 total yards in the 
second halbefore the final drive. Of 
those 40 yais, only six were through 
the air, givig an indication of how 
well prepard the secondary was for 
Humphries and the Southland 
Conference'ieading passing offense. 

After ie Demons got the ball 
back, Stoker xi them on the road to 
the lead, cheMng up 4:51 of the clock 
before puncmg it in himself from 
three yards oi. Hodnett's PAT gave 
North westents first lead of the game 
with 10:09 lefth the game. 

Once agin the defense rose to 
the occasion 'ith Leonard Parker 
making a key iterception to set up a 
Hodnett field gal from 32 yards out 
at the 5:34 mark 

Northwetern's defense held 



on the next possession, and Stoker 
and company took over again with 
5:08 to go. The Demons steadily 
moved downfield, picking up two 
first downs before Stoker came up 
short on fourth and three at the thir- 
teen, setting the tide for Humphries to 
work his sorcery. 

"If we had kicked, and they 
came back and scored a touchdown 
and kicked an extra point, then it's a 
tie and we're out of the conference 
race at 1-1-1," said Top Demon Sam 
Goodwin. "If we get the first down 
then that's the last play of the game 
because they had no timeouts." 

"Right now we're basically out 
of the conference race and the only 
thing we've got to shoot for is the 
playoffs," Goodwin said. "There's so 
much of the season left, but we've got 
to focus on USL this week." 



Southwestern Louisiana is October 10 




said. "We an 
Hots that v 
on board." 
James 

next for the Demons as thev start a fi/ irector of S 
game road trip. The Ragin ; Ca juns ^ esil S atlon 1 
coming off consecutive losses to Okif" 11 SOme qi 
homa State (36-0) and Alabama ( 3p° minatlon b 
10), both Division 1-A schools. *«™f»ncy 

- jctually sub 

committee. T 

'They're improving and :dection com 
looks to me like they played their ^nomination 
game of the year against Alabamaf leado " ^ 
said Goodwin. "Going down there, Unn . 

going to make it vcrv touch to \vin ing ' ma ' 

landed an < 

nci ■ i- i-i ;M es were c 
USL is sporting a 1-3 recow ^ 
u i ,u r« i-ii v ,;preme Court 

while the Demons are still hckfif «. 
*u • a u . i ■ ,,, jnthecontes 

their wounds after two straight heaf Ij7 

breaking losses, evening their recor • j 

at 2-2. The loss to NLU dropped if ' 
„ , . • , • iommittee di 

Demons from number eight m th ij j 

.. ■■ u m invalid due I 

nation to number 19. ., 

lowever the 

arried to the 

The Ragin' Cajuns and til t u ^^'c 
Purple People Eaters clash at 7:30 p. n , flz ™l 
■ r • ■ Ti- u • i c . c . vMr. NSUbal 
in Caiun Field in Lafavctte Saturdai 

«cause it we 

Jerome Cox s 




65^ 




*0W the propi 
ing the balk 
igned ballot 

SGA 
irgued that t 
plete agreem 
iherefore no 
Jackie 
arge and act 
Sept. 24 SGA 
ocumented 
hich stated 
ent in nomi 
fSU. Nomir 
Ind Rachel h 
"I war 
vestern to ki 
vas not inde 
dr. and Miss 
lations shoul 
rickland sa 
Durinj 
g, Jerome 
estions as 
landled. He' 
lallots were c 
5 and were 
ion committ 

Your Choice Of Jte.Coxsaid 
Original heSGAoffk 

3 _ . Other 

Extra CrispJbout elec 

Hot & Spicy Monday's mc 
'eport camp 
lay. The elec 
he announc 
Arhich is an 



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Customer pays all applicable sales tax. 



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This coupon good for 2 pieces of Original 
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^■al W^tk H HHH I 



"Educa 
key to hoi 
communic 
sity. In the 
wearing p 
in humorx 
how to ad 
Frierson ; 
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October 6, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 5 



tro, i vo. 



^ NEWS 



t^ominations 

continued from page 1 



said. "We are attempting to verify all 

3r± jjallots that were viewed by the elec- 
mm "\ lion board." 

"* James Meadors, assistant to the 
they start a fj/ irector of Student Life - said tnc in " 
igin''CajutK a J' esti 8 ation is Sti " 0pen " " There are 
? losses to Ok']r* iU 50016 °. uestlons concerning the 

. ., , nomination ballots. There is too much 

I Alabama nL . , , ,, 

schools fniscrepancy in how the ballots were 

- (dually submitted to the election 
committee. There was no way for the 
oving and '^ 1 ' 011 committee to determine if a 
laved their bcP° mination sheet was turned in '" 
inst Alabama * eado !: ssaid - 

; down there Dunn S Monda y' s ^ A m «*- 

tough to win?* the ma ) orit y of the s*™^ de ' 
-nanded an explanation on how the 

j ^ r ^ .yotes were processed and if the Su- 

^ 3 . ii i^Itren 16 Court had reached a decision 
re still hckit n. „ L t t - 
... bn the contestation. 

°. Car At the meeting, Jerome Cox 
ng their rccoi ., _„ . . °. 

U dro-> ed if 8 election appeals 

f ,uT C 'Wimittee declared the contestation 
° jivalid due to insufficient evidence, 

lowever the contestation is being 
arried to the SGA Supreme Court. 

, , Another topic of heated debate 
aiuns and tr , . / 

i i. .Tin "as that the SG A s nomination for the 
lashat /:30p.n, xi^it, ... 

a » r - NSU ballot was declared inva id 
vctte baturda: 

because it was not turned in on time. 

je rome Cox said the SGA did not fol- 

ow the proper procedures in submit- 

ing the ballot and did not turn in a 

signed ballot form. 

SGA President Johnny Cox 
irgued that the SGA was not in com- 
plete agreement for the nominations, 
:herefore no ballot was submitted. 

Jackie Strickland, senator-at- 
arge and acting secretary during the 

e>pt. 24 SGA meeting, presented the 
Kumented minutes of the meeting 
hich stated SGA did reach an agree- 
ent in nominations for Mr. and Miss 
SU. Nominees were Todd Sterling 
id Rachel Hieder. 

"I want the students of North- 
vestern to know that the SGA senate 
vas not indecisive about nominating 
dr. and Miss NSU and that our nomi- 
lations should have been submitted," 
Jrickland said. 

During Monday's SGA meet- 
Jg, Jerome Cox was asked many 
^^^■^^^tucstions as to how the ballots were 
^^^k landled. He would only state that the 
A (allots were collected on Friday, Sept. 
5 and were not viewed by the elec- 
ion committee until Monday, Sept. 
Lee Of Cox said the ballots were kept in 
n a 1 he SGA office over the weekend . 

Other arguments brought up 
d^i-SpJj OUt election procedures at 
Sp i cy Monday's meeting included the Shre- 
'eport campus elections held Mon- 
1ay. The elections were held prior to 
he announcement inCurrent Sauce, 
Arhich is an election code require- 




ment, and without having the nomi- 
nation ballot declared official. 

The senate's main argument 
was that the commissioner of elec- 
tions was either careless or deliberate 
in his procedure of distributing ballot 
application forms to campus organi- 
zations, in processing and tallying the 
submitted ballot application forms 
and in judging which application 
forms were valid or invalid. 

The topic neared conclusion 
with a round of heated debates on 
whether the Mr. and Miss NSU nomi- 
nations should be declared invalid. 
The senate was split on deciding 
whether to void just the Mr. and Miss 
NSU nominations or to void all nomi- 
nations submitted including the State 
Fair Court. The motion to void Mr. 
and Miss NSU nominations was re- 
jected twice. The motion carried on 
the third attempt. 

Heated debate continued on 
how the third and final motion was 
worded. Some senators wanted to 
void the entire nomination ballot on 
the grounds that if the Mr. and Miss 
NSU nomination ballots were mis- 
handled, so were the State Fair Court 
nominations. 

To prevent another revote, 
four representatives, Kevin Hopkins, 
David Wolfe, Andrew Harrison and 
Michael McHale, walked out of the 
meeting to break senate quorum. 

Supreme Court Justice Mi- 
chael Mason said the decision on the 
election committee procedures is still 
pending. 

Awareness 

continued from page 1 

Exhibits by local and state po- 
lice, Coca-Cola and other organiza- 
tions will be on display in the Student 
Union throughout the week. Natchi- 
toches Parish Sheriff's Department 
will demonstrate the Breathalyzer 
which is used to determine the level of 
alcohol content in the blood. 

Local businesses are also play- 
ing a part in Alcohol Awareness 
Week. Domino's Pizza donated 25 
cents for every pizza sold during 
homecoming weekend. Kinko's do- 
nated 1,500 flyers for BACCHUS and 
Budweiser will provide free samples 
of 'Texas Select" alcohol-free beer. 

NC A A W buttons will be avail- 
able for a donation of 25 cents to 
BAACHUS. All funds raised will go 
toward alcohol education programs 
at Northwestern. 

Videos and shows concerning 
alcohol awareness week will be 
shown daily in room 240 of the Stu- 
dent Union. In addition to the regu- 
larly shown movies in The Addition, 
special movies will be offered. Special 
movies inlcude "Sweet Dreams," 



"The Rose" and "Arthur," according 
to Montgomery. 

Local radio stations are also 
contributing to the cause. KZBL and 
KQID are airing Northwestern stu- 
dent public service announcements. 
KNWD will air live endorsements by 
Northwestern students, faculty and 
staff. KNOC will air information con- 
cerning NCAAW at Northwestern. 

According to Dan Dupree, 
president of BACCHUS, the main 
goal of the organization is to "pro- 
mote responsible decision making 
concerning alcohol use." Dupree said 
BACCHUS is not out to preach but to 
educate students. "Prevention 
through education is our goal," he 
said. 

BACCHUS is already plan- 
ning future events including fun- 
draisers and speakers and slide shows 
in the dorms. According to Dupree, 
BACCHUS will concentrate on pre- 
holiday periods. The group will offer 
activities similar to Alcohol Aware- 
ness Week during the week prior to 
holidays. 

Pauline Ackel, a former nurse 
at Northwestern, organized BAC- 
CHUS on campus. Ackel, who saw a 
need for an alcohol awareness pro- 
gram at Northwestern, began organ- 
izing the program more than a year 
ago. At the first meeting of the organi- 
zation, eight members joined. This 
year the membership has grown to 
more than 45 members. 

BACCHUS was founded at the 
University of Florida in 1 976 and no w 
has more than 250 chapters on college 
and university campuses in the 
United States and Canada. The group 
is based on the premise that young 
people play a unique and effective 
role in encouraging their peers to re- 
flect on, talk honestly about and de- 
velop responsible habits, Dupree 
said. 

BACCHUS is a non-profit alco- 
hol awareness and education pro- 
gram on college and university cam- 
puses promoting responsible use of 
beverage alcohol. The group pro- 
motes informed, independent deci- 
sion-making and respect for the 
choice of abstinence. 

For more information on BAC- 
CHUS or Alcohol Awareness Week, 
go by the BACCHUS office in room 
311 Student Union or call 357-5287. 
Office hours are 2 to 4 p.m. Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday and 11 a.m. to 
noon Tuesday and Thursday. Infor- 
mation about BACCHUS can also be 
obtained in the Infirmary. 



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TEACHERS' PETS 




Michael Frierson 
and his wife, 
Martha Garrett, 
spend their week- 
ends filming lumps 
of clay. Their pur- 
pose: to make 
math fun. 
Math . . . few? 



"Education through entertainment is the 
key to holding attention," says Frierson. a 
communications professor at Loyola Univer- 
sity. In their films, cone-shaped clay "knights," 
wearing positive or negative pennants, engage 
in humorous medieval battle scenes to show 
how to add and subtract negative numbers. 
Frierson and Garrett did the films for the 
Children's Television Workshop series "Square 
One Television," seen weekday afternoons 
on FBS. 



Louisiana's Investor-Owned Electric Com- 
panies support efforts to inspire and develop 
young minds in basic high-tech studies. Pro- 
grams such as "Square One Television" help 
intrigue children with math at the age when 
they usually turn it off, between 8 and 12. 

Appetites acquired early endure. 

The national MATHCOUNTS program con- 
tinues the effort to excite them in junior high 
through challenging, rewarding math com- 
petitions against other schools. In Louisiana, 
the LIOEC sponsors the competition admin- 
istered by the Louisiana Engineering Soci- 
ety, an affiliate of the National Society of 
Professional Engineers, to help encourage 
young people to pursue careers in high-tech 
industries. 

As energy companies, we place top prior- 
ity on helping develop our state's future 
supply of scientists, mathematicians, and 
engineers. 



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Date: Oct. 19-23 Time: 9:00-3:30 Deposit Required; $20.00 
Place: University Bookstore 
ON OCTOBER 20, "REPRESENTATIVE AVAILABLE 
Meet with your Jostens representative for full details. See our complete ring selection 
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Page 6 



CURRENT SAUCE 



m 

October 6, 1987 



CAMPUS LINE 



I 




Arthritis Foundation drive Wesley Foundation 



SAB and SG A are co-sponsoring 
a fund drive for the Arthritis Founda- 
tion Oct. 12-16. The theme of the fund 
drive is "Up, Up, and Away with 
Arthritis." Northwestern will com- 
pete against Tech by selling $1 tickets. 
For each ticket sold by a Northwest- 
ern student, a purple or white balloon 
will be released at the State Fair Game 
in Shreveport on Oct. 24. All area civic 
groups and other organizations are 
asked to help Northwestern in this 
fund raising activity to help beat ar- 
thritis and Tech. For more informa- 
tion, contact Carl Henry or Kenneth 
Holmes at 357-6511 or 357-6512. 

SAM 

The Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management (SAM) is selling 
M&M candy as a fund raising project. 
The candy can be purchased from any 
SAM member. 

Membership dues for all mem- 
bers of SAM should be paid by Oct. 7. 
The next meeting of SAM will be held 
Oct. 29. Business majors interested in 
joining SAM should contact Dr. 
Burkhead by Oct. 7 in the Business 
Administration Building. 

The Department of Business has 
a new policy that all signs are to be 
posted on bulletin boards only. Any- 
thing posted on building walls will be 
removed. \ 

TKE 

Tau Kappa Epsilon announces 
the association of Daniel Anderson, 
Corey Wilkerson, Joe Roy, Donald 
Gros and Wayne Bonnette to the fra- 
ternity. The addition brings the total 
for the 1987 pledge class to 30. TEKE 
also announces the arrival of Mike 
Sewell back to the active chapter 
bringing the total of active members 
to 15. 



Tax law 

North western's Personnel Of- 
fice announces that it is now manda- 
tory that all dependent children have 
a social security number by Jan. 1, 
1988. 



The Wesley Foundation has 
planned a fund raising supper for 
Thursday. The menu consists of 
world famous Natchitoches meat 
pies, hot tamales, dirty rice, tea and 
cake. Serving will begin at 4:30 p.m. 
and end 7 p.m. Take-out meals will be 
available, but customers will have to 
provide their own container. 

A car wash and bake sale has 
also been planned for Saturday from 9 
a.m. till noon at the Foundation. 
Trucks and cars will be washed for $3 
and vans will be washed for S5. The 
Foundation is located on College 
Avenue across from the Alumni Cen- 
ter. 



Baseball 

The Northwestern Demon 
baseball team will face the Tech Bull- 
dogs in a scrimmage Wednesday af- 
ternoon at the NSUbaseball diamond. 
Admission is free. Students are en- 
couraged to attend and support the 
Demons. 



Sigma Kappa 

Sigma Kappa Sorority's annual 
Dream Man party has been planned 
for Oct. 14. Active members and 
pledges must turn in their invitations 
by Wednesday. 

Invitations will be handed out 
by Friday. The male with the most 
invitations will be crowned Sigma 
Kappa's Dream Man. Only a few 
chosen men will be invited to the 
party. 

Purple Jackets 

The Purple Jackets are sponsor- 
ing a raffle for "A Night on the Town" 
as a fundraiser. The raffle will include 
items necessary to make a perfect 
date, including dinner at the 
Mariner's. See a Purple Jacket for 
more information. 

The next Purple Jacket meeting 
will be 11 a.m. Thursday. A speaker 
has been scheduled to appear. Ex- 
cuses for absences are to be turned in 
to Monte Johnson. 



Demon FTX 

ST' • | | 

More than 300 JROTC cadets 
will arrive at Northwestern Friday 
from area high schools for the annual 
Demon Field Training Exercises. The 
JROTC cadets will be assigned to pla- 
toons during their stay. During the 
three-day training weekend, cadets 
will be exposed to land navigation, 
first aid, rope bridges and basic sur- 
vival. The cadets will prepare a Satur- 
day evening meal using a live chicken. 
This activity is being sponsored by the 
Demon Battalion. 

Cucka 

John Cucka, assistant profes- 
sor of accounting at Northwestern, 
has been appointed to serve as a 
member of the education committee 
for the Society of Louisiana Certified 
Public Accountants. 

Cucka is one of 14 professional 
accountants named to the state 
society's education committee. 

A certified public accountant 
and member of the Louisiana and 
American Societies of Certified Public 
Accountants, Cucka has been a mem- 
ber of the Northwestern faculty since 
the summer of 1974. 



Whitten 

Barry Whitten of Shreveport, a 
senior vocal performance major at 
Northwestern, will present a recital 8 
p.m. Wednesday in the Recital Hall of 
the A. A. Fredericks Creative and Per- 
forming Arts Center. 

Whitten's senior rectial, which 
is being given in partial fulfillment of 
the requirements for the bachelor of 
music degree, will feature works for 
vocalists by George Fried rich Handel, 
Robert Schumann, Franz Joseph 
Haydn, Henri Duparc and Ralph 
Vaughn Williams. 

The recital program is spon- 
sored by the Northwestern Depart- 
ment of Music and Theater Arts and is 
free of charge. 

Iberville 

Campus groups and clubs 
wishing to obtain wallspace in Iber- 
ville Dining Hall for use should con- 
tact James Taylor, director of board 
operations, at 357-6451. Taylor said 
wall space will be issued on a first- 
come first-serve basis. Wall space will 
be assigned to specific groups to use 
as they please for posting notices, 
hanging group pictures or crests. 




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Loan services offered 



This is the fourth article in a series 
on Watson Library 

Watson Library offers many 
services to the Northwestern commu- 
nity including the Interlibrary Loan or 
I.L.L. as it is commonly called in the 
library business. 

When Watson Library lacks 
journals or books which are needed 
for research projects, the I.L.L. allows 
patrons to draw upon the resources of 
other libraries. 

Annually, Watson Library re- 
quests more than 500 books and pho- 
tocopies of journal articles to help 
fulfill research needs. In addition, an 
equal number of books and articles 
are loaned to other libraries. 

Watson Library processes 
interlibrary loan requests through the 
I.L.L. Subsystem. Based in Columbus, 
Ohio, the subsystem is a computer 
network of more than 6,000 libraries 
in the United States, Canada, Great 
Britain, Europe and the Pacific. It 
provides almost instantaneous access 
to a database listing more than 13 
million books and journals. 



Requests are sent to the poten- 
tial lending library via computer, 
saving time over conventional mailed 
requests. After the request is made, it 
takes two to three weeks for the mate- 
rials to be recieved by Watson Library. 
The materials travel to Natchitoches 
via the U.S. Postal Service. 

Some requests, however, are 
made through libraries participating 
in the Green-Gold van system. These 
libraries, which include surrounding 
parish libraries, Shreve Memorial, 
and libraries at Southern, LSU-Shre- 
veport and Centenary, sponsor a van 
which delivers materials on a twice- 
weekly basis. Requests made through 
the van system arrive within a week to 
10 days. 

Students, staff and faculty 
from Northwestern and the Scholars' 
College are encouraged to take ad- 
vantage of Watson's Interlibrary Loan 
Service. Parish residents have access 
to the same services through their 
local public libraries. Fees may be 
charged for postage, photocopying or 
handling, depending upon the type of 
request and the fulfilling library. 




Paul Hardy 

Paul Hardy, candidate for lieu- 
tenant governor, will speak Oct.15 at 
3:30 p.m. in room 321 in the Student 
Union. The College Republicans are 
sponsoring the candidate's appear- 
ance. 

Library hours 

Watson Library service hours 
for the 1987 fall semester are from 8 
a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday; 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday; 10 
a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; and 2 to 10 
p.m. Sunday. 

The media/serials division 
closes at 10 p.m. weeknights. The 
Gammie Henry Research Center is 
open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through 
Friday. 

Due to the increase in aca- 
demic emphasis on campus, students 
are urged to locate and secure study 
and research materials well in ad- 
vance of assignment deadlines. 




\sv\ 



"Sid* 



y GREG Kl 
dltor 

A mc 
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on failed i 
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The n 
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lleged: me 
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Come Join 
The Fun!! 



r LISA DAK 
anaglng I 

Despiti 
»ut forme 
paying stu 
n graduatf 
cords in h 
ents. 

Accord 
unting c 
ce, North 
ult rate c 
ly the ^ 
n. The na 
I repay loa 
ur h a m said 

The F 
tanged nai 
Resident Rc 
Igher Edu 
HI, is a loa 
iidents reqi 
Accord 
: rof Financi 
the Gua 
SL) excepl 
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1 .hool not a 
irkins Loar 
e federal g 
nt by these 
ian is five p 
Defauli 
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pna Tech, 1 
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r usiana anc 
H ing State. 
H I Gil Gil! 
^ llancial Ai 
"i*r default i 
^ Irham. "Tl 
^ ;so low is 
J 611 with gra 
^ *r students 
h tyments," 1 
p&\ Faust i 
ts are we 

Itud 

' MICHELE 
taff Writer 

The bit 
•4 | becoming 
►<fents living 
We recently 

^ Maintenance 

hi „ 
1 During 

w 'the major 

k water in 

| Richard i 

trector, stuc 

*i *g for two v 

i We or no h< 

* [d late eve 

/j iedorm wei 

^ & hot durin 

^ [ Accord 

^ illy St. Anc 

pt 'nee facili 

Pi fety for th 

*i ^intenance 

fcter were 

Pusing Dej 

item for F 

ted la 

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6, 1987 



ed 



to the potcn- 
ia computer, 
tional mailed 
est is made, it 
>forthemate- 
atson Library. 
Natchitoches 
ce. 

however, are ; 

participating 
;ystem. These 

surrounding 
'e Memorial, 
rn, LSU-Shre- 
sponsor a van 
Is on a twice- 
nade through 
thin a week to 




VOL 76 NO. 1! 




.^■t m itt ^^mMhh^^'. ^^^^^^^^^^^ 

AUCt 



WESTERN STATE UNIVE8SHY OF LOUISIANA 



NiATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 71497 



and faculty 
I the Scholars' V GREG KENDRICK 
d to take ad- jfltor 
srlibrary Loan 
ts have access 



SGA senators' impeachment of Commissioner of Elections fails 



A motion to impeach Student 
lovernment Association (SGA) 
through their k mm i ss i oner of Elections Jerome 
Fees may be . fix failed on the floor Monday night 
otocopymg or tthe weekly SGA meeting. The mo- 
xm the type of „,„ failed after a secret ballot was 
eld among SGA senators. The sena- 
>rs voted seven for, seven against 
pd one abstention for impeaching 
le commissioner of elections. 

The motion was introduced to 
je floor by senator Andrew Harri- 
jn. Harrison's opening statement 
(leged: members of the appointed 
lection board were not the same at 
omination meetings; general incom- 
etence of the commissioner of elec- 
pns caused the contestation and re- 
dl of several past elections; the 
j>mmissioner of elections mis- 
indled nominations of state fair and 
fr. and Miss NSU; and that it would 
e in the best interest of the student 



\ 



body that the commissioner of elec- 
tions be dismissed. 

Following the proposal by 
Harrison, Cox said, "All I have to say 
is I feel 1 have done my job well." 

As part of SGA impeachment 
procedure, Supreme Court Justice 
Michael Mason took over as parlia- 
mentarian and allowed the senate to 
state the accusations and interroga- 
tion against Cox. 

Harrison opened the line of 
inquiry by asking Cox about the origi- 
nal ballot, which was comprised of 
four names. Harrison then asked why 
names were added to the ballot at a 
later date. 

In reply, Cox said the SGA elec- 
tion code does not allow tied candi- 
dates to increase the ballot above 12. 
In order to bring the number of candi- 
dates down to an acceptable number, 
Cox said he and the election commit- 
tee eliminated some of the candidates. 
Cox said he did not know why these 



candidates, who did not meet qualifi- 
cations for Mr. NSU, were eliminated 
before the first ballot was posted. 

When asked by Harrison if he 
could name the candidates that were 
eliminated, Cox could not comply. 

Cox was then questioned as to 
why the Shreveport campus received 
a ballot before the official ballot was 
posted. Cox said he was not aware of 
that fact. 

When Cox was asked if the 
election board actually met, he said 
the meeting was held Monday, Sept. 
28, but he could not remember two of 
the names of the four individuals who 
served on that committee. 

Cox also denied the allegation 
that in an earlier interview with the 
Current Sauce he had said the contesta- 
tion was withdrawn by the two indi- 
viduals who had submitted it. 

When Cox was asked if all Mr. 
and Miss NSU nominees were con- 
tacted after the new ballot was com- 



NSU leads in loan repayment rates 



cm 



iana 



f USA DARDEN 
bridging Editor 

Despite current bad publicity 
tout former college students not 
(paying student loans, Northwest- 
n graduates have one of the best 
jcords in Louisiana for loan repay- 
ments. 

According to Betty Durham, 
(counting clerk in the Controller's 
mce, Northwestern has a 2.5 percent 
(fault rate on the Perkins Loan, for- 
jerly the National Direct Student 
lan. The national average on failure 
I repay loans is about 11 percent, 
'Jk urham said. 

The Perkins Loan, which 
Ranged names Jan. 1, 1987, after 
resident Ronald Reagan signed the 
igher Education Reauthorization 
ll, is a loan issued by schools to 
jjdents requesting a student loan. 

According to Terry Faust, direc- 
fof Financial Aid, the loan is similar 
\ the Guaranteed Student Loan 
►* 1SL) except that the interest rate is 
itver and that it is issued by the 
1 hool not a lending institution. The 
^ Jrkins Loan is funded 90 percent by 
' k federal government and 10 per- 
jnt by the school. Interest rate on the 
- an is five percent. 

■1 



h *ana Tech, 10.2 percent at Northeast, 
m '..43 percent at Southeastern 
fusiana and 22.36 percent at Gram- 
fng State. 

Gil Gilson, assistant director of 
"> Hancial Aid, said Northwestem's 
default rate can be attributed to 
^jBrham. "The reason the default rate 
~[So low is because Betty works so 
jell with graduates. She contacts for- 
^Sr students if they are late making 
h tyments," he said. 
p> Faust said Northwestern stu- 
*i Snts are well informed on the loan 



jnt 



Default rates of other schools in 
e state include 5.59 percent at Lou- 



^Students complain about dormitory water 



Edorm were complaining of having Tyree said w « n^notified about 
2 » hot during any part of the day 



and repayment procedure. Students 
receiving a Perkins Loan from North- 
western are required to attend two 
interviews — an entrance interview, 
which occurs when the loan is 
granted, and an exit interview, which 
occurs when students graduate or 
resign from school. Both interviews 
are used to inform students on the 
loan and repayment procedures. 

Faust attributes the low default 
rate to the selectiveness of issuing the 
Perkins Loan, a computer package, 
which allows for quicker processing 
of loans and payments, and Durham. 

"She's (Durham) very educated 
in this area and knows how to collect 
loans. With 98 percent of the students 
paying back loans we have one of the 
lowest rates in the state and probably 
in the nation," Faust said. 

The low default rate is good not 
only for Northwestem's reputation 
but also for its students. According to 
Faust, repayments received from 
loans goes into a revolving account 
which is used to fund future Perkins 
Loans. 

Each time a loan is issued, 
Northwestern must pay 10 percent of 
the amount of the loan up front. This 
amount is paid out of the account 
from past loan repayments, Faust 
explained. The more loans that are 
repaid, the more Northwestern has to 
lend to current and future students. 

Durham said Northwestern 
currently receives about $7,000 quar- 
terly from past loan repayments. 

In addition to processing Perk- 
ins Loan repayments and keeping 
contact with former students, Dur- 
ham is also responsible for keeping 
track of the Nursing Student Loan 
(NSL) repayments. The NSL is a loan 
issued to students pursuing a 
bachelor's degree in nursing. The 
default rate on the NSL is 35 percent. 



Students receiving Perkins 
Loans are given a six month grace 
period after graduation before begin- 
ning repayments on the loan. Repay- 
ments are made quarterly for a maxi- 
mum of 10 years. Students in the mili- 
tary are allowed a three year grace 
repayment period. 

Durham said special arrange- 
ments can be made for hardship cases 
in repaying the loan. Examples of 
hardship cases include unemploy- 
ment and sickness. The loan repay- 
ment is cancelled if permanent or total 
disability occurs or upon the death of 
the former student. A special cancella- 
tion clause hiis cilso been created for 
teachers teaching for five years at a 
low income school or with physically 
or mentally handicapped students, 
Durham said. 

Durham said the government is 
strict in granting hardship or cancella- 
tion cases and that the situation must 
be proven through documentation. 

Although Northwestern has a 
low default rate, Durham occasion- 
ally has trouble getting former stu- 
dents to repay loans. If a former stu- 
dent or student's relatives refuse to 
cooperate and payments are not made 
within 120 days, the defaulted loan is 
turned over to the U.S. Attorney 
General. The Attorney General's of- 
fice will pursue the case and will 
charge 33.3 percent interest instead of 
the five percent interest charged by 
the school. In some cases prosecution 
of the default takes place. 

Durham makes an extra effort to 
prevent such events from happening 
to Northwestern graduates. She tries 
to stay in close contact with students 
despite the difficulty in keeping up 
with changing names, addresses and 
numbers. 

"The personal contact made by 
Betty has a lot to do with the low 
default rate," Gilson said. 



H V MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
H tatf Writer 

H J The bittersweet taste of "home" 
; becoming more of a reality to stu- 
-i ents living in the dorms. Students 
*i *ve recently had difficulty in getting 
^ Maintenance problems corrected. 

During the past two weeks, one 
Ithe major problems was the lack of 
water in Rapides Hall. According 
^ j Richard Darden, Rapides house 
Irector, students had beencomplain- 
for two weeks about having very 
t *tle or no hot water in the mornings 
^>d late evenings. Some sections of 



ing water for use in Rapides Hall. The 
steam trap was replaced Wednesday. 

Kirk Tyree, Northwestem's 
plant engineer, said that while Rapi- 
des was without hot water for two 
weeks, water heaters were being in- 
stalled in Bossier, Caddo, and 
Prudhomme halls. Tyree said the 
dorms receiving heaters had no alter- 
nate source of hot water. 

St. Andre said the Maintenance 
Department was notified of the hot 
water problem in Rapides as soon as 
maintenance slips were turned into 
the Housing Department. However, 



, According to both Darden and 
^5ly St. Andre, coordinator of resi- 
H'nce facilities maintenance and 
« *fety for the Housing Department, 
K laintenance notices concerning hot 
^•ater were turned in daily to the 



the problem until Wednesday. Tyree 
said he heard nothing concrete about 
the hot water problem in Rapides 
until Wednesday. 

St. Andre said a change in proce- 
dure at the power plant has eased the 
lack of hot water. According to St. 



Pusing Department. The hot water Andre the hot water was being turned 



3<>rthwestern's Maintenance Depart- turned on at 4:30 a.m. Tyree said hot 



B333 



item for Rapides was finally cor- 
ded last Wednesday by 



off at 11 :30 p.m. and turned back on at 
5:30 a.m. The hot water is now being 



►-'ent 

*i Darden said it took about three 
•Tnutes for the Maintenance Depart- 
mt to assess the hot water problem 
*ce someone arrived to examine the 
stem According to Darden, the 
blem was a bad steam trap. 
The bad steam trap was pre- 



water would be unavailable for only 
three hours, if any, in the dorms. 

Tyree said that between 1 and 4 
a.m. students may not find hot water 
readily available. Rapides has a thou- 
sand-gallon water tank which holds 
excess hot water after the boilers have 
been shut down for the night. Sabine 



'Mine steam, provided by the cam- is equipped with two 800-gallon tanks 
4s underground system, from heat- for holding excess hot water. 



Harold Boutte, director of 
Housing, said parts of Sabine and 
Bossier have also been having hot 
water problems. However, St. Andre 
said he has received no maintenance 
slips concerning hot water problems 
from any of thedorms except Rapides. 
Boutte attributed the hot water prob- 
lem to a switch in the current steam 
system. Boutte said a new system is 
being installed at the Power Plant. 

Tyree said some of the problems 
in Bossier Hall are caused by a satellite 
boiler being rented for use while the 
main steam system is shut down for 
renovation. According to Tyree the 
satellite boiler is located outside the 
building and has been turned off sev- 
eral times by unauthorized individu- 
als. The flame has also gone out a 
couple of times. Tyree said the satel- 
lite boiler costs about $4,000 to S5,000 
for three weeks rental. 

Boutte said, "The two biggest 
dorms are the ones that have more 
personnel in it, more of our students 
in it. That's why they have most of the 
problems because of more people 
using a lot of water." 

Boutte said he believed the 
power plant has been doing a "pretty 
good job" dealing with the hot water 
situation and other maintenance 
problems presented to them. "I know 

See Water 



Page Seven 



pleted, Cox said, "I contacted all the 
people on the ballot." However, Sena- 
tor Harrison submitted a signed state- 
ment by Miss NSU candidate Darcy 
Leblanc which stated she was not in- 
formed by Cox of the ballot results. 
Cox then said he did not contact all 
nominees. 

Senator Kevin Hopkins asked 
Cox if the same members of the elec- 
tion board processed the nominations 
when it had to be processed a second 
time. Cox replied, "No, some of the 
numbers had to go home over the 
weekend and I was not able to contact 
them." 

Hopkins argued that the same 
members of the committee should 
have been present at both meetings. 
"Members of the SGA who serve on 
committees should know their re- 
sponsibilities and should be account- 
able for their actions," Hopkins said. 

Senator Jackie Strickland ar- 
gued with Hopkin's point saying that 



Cox should not be held accountable 
for the actions of other committee 
members. "How was the commis- 
sioner of elections to know that his 
committee was leaving town for the 
weekend," Strickland said. 

Later in the proceeding, Cox 
listed the members of the Mr. and 
Miss NSU election committee as being 
Troy Guillory, Melissa Smith, Donald 
Hall and Elliot Jones. 

State Fair Chairman Sheila 
Delozia presented a signed statement 
by Donald Hall stating that Hall was 
approached by Jerome Cox the day 
after the first nomination ballot was 
submitted. At that time Hall was 
asked to approve the ballot with his 
signature. 

In an earlier interview with the 
Current Sauce ,Hall admitted to hav- 
ing no affiliation with the Mr. and 
Miss NSU election committee. "I 
never wanted to be involved with the 
election committee. I had no idea I 



was supposed to be on the election 
committee," Hall said. 

Cox denied having such a con- 
versation with Hall. "I just wanted 
Hall to serve on the Mr. and Miss NSU 
election committee during the second 
time," Cox said. 

Senator David Wolfe, said "I 
have worked on each and every elec- 
tion we have had this year here and it 
appears to me that we have too many 
meetings by the election committee 
that have no accountability of who 
were at those meetings." 

The SGA senate decided to 
suspend the code which mandates a 
newly developed issue be tabled for a 
week before voting and proceeded 
with the voting of impeachment. The 
SGA decided to vote by secret ballot. 

The motion failed with seven 
for impeachment, seven against im- 
peachment, and one abstention. The 
senate needed two-thirds vote to 
achieve the impeachment. 



"The Glass Menagerie" scheduled 




"How are you feeling now? Any better?" 

The Gentlemen Caller (Mark Robbins) asks Laura (Elizabeth Robbins) in this 
scene from "The Glass Menagerie." The Missouri Repertory Theatre will present 
Tennessee Williams' poignant memory play Thursday, October 15, at 7:30 p.m., in 
the A, A. Fredericks Fine Arts Auditorium. 



By MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
Staff Writer 

Northwestem's Artist Series 
will present the national tour produc- 
tion of the Tennessee Williams play 
"The Glass Menagerie/' by the Mis- 
souri Repertory Theater 7:30 p.m. 
Thursday in the A.A. Fredericks Crea- 
tive and Performing Arts Center. 

In addition to the performance, 
members of the Missouri Repertory 
Theater will conduct a special work- 
shop Thursday afternoon. Classes in 
audition techniques, use of the voice 
and theater improvisation will be 
held 2 p.m. Thursday in Theater West 
located in the old portion of the A.A. 
Fredericks Art Center. The workshop 
is being offered to the public and stu- 
dents at Northwestern and Louisiana 
School for free. 

"The Glass Menagerie" is the 
first of five events scheduled for the 
1987-88 Artist Series. Tony Smith, 
chairman of the Artist Series for sue 
years.said the Series has been held for 
about 25 years. Other shows sched- 
uled are the Shreveport Symphony 
Chamber Orchestra, Nov. 2; the New 
Orleans Philharmonic, Jan. 25; the 
Vienna Choir Boys, Feb.lO; and the 
Joffrey H Dancers, March 3. Smith em- 
phasized that the Series is not a dressy 
occasion. Casual dress is appropriate. 

Smith said he believes the tour 
group will have a tough task of top- 
ping the tourgroup which performed 
last spring. According to Smith, this is 
the first timethat the Artist Series has 
worked with the Missouri Repertory 
Theater. "Th ev are the most profes- 
sional theater group I have ever 



worked with," Smith said. 

Smith said the Series has been 
trying to get one of Tennessee Wil- 
liams' works on campus and added, 
"I must admit one of the main reasons 
that we are bringing them here is 
because of the play they are doing." 

Smith said he believes art is a 
part of the educational system. "The 
idea behind the Series is to bring in 
artistic attractions that are of a reaUy 
high level in terms of presentation — 
to bring in the very best that the arts 
have to offer," he said. 

Smith said the SAB is in charge 
of bringing entertainment to the col- 
lege campus but believes their duty is 
to bring a different type of entertain- 
ment to the students. Smith said the 
Artist Series works with the SAB on 
other projects. Smith has spoken with 
some SAB members about working to 
bring a major musical on campus next 
year. 

Director of "The Glass Menag- 
erie" for the Missouri Repertory Thea- 
ter is George Keathley. Keathley di- 
rected the Broadway revival of "The 
Glass Menagerie" in 1965. The 1987 
national tour by the Missouri Reper- 



breaking or shattering of the Ameri 
can dream." She added, 'It is almost! 
un-American." Burroughs said she 
believes "The Glass Menagerie" is a 
classic tale of America. She said she 
sees the young people' of America 
having a better understanding of the 
autobiographical play because of the 
nature of the characters in the play. 
Burroughs said her favorite perform- 
ance of "The Glass Menagerie" is the 
television movie starring Katherine 
Hepburn. 

The Missouri Repertory Thea 
ter, originated in Kansas City, was 
founded in 1964 at the University of 
Missouri-Kansas City. The theater 
group was established as a non-profit 
corporation in 1979. Grants from the 
Missouri Arts Council, the Mid- 
America Arts Alliance, the North 
Carolina Arts Council and Hallmark 
Cards Inc. make the tour perform- 
ances possible. 

Tickets are S5 for adults and S3 
for students and senior citizens. Sea- 
son tickets for the Artist Series are also 
available. Cost of season tickets are 
S25 for family membership, $15 for 
adults and $10 for students and senior 



tory Theater is Keathley's eighth pro- citizens, 
duction of the play. 

"The Glass Menagerie" was 
Williams' first great hit. He wrote the 
story in 1944 and it was performed in 
Chicago that same year. It was pro- 
duced for the New York stage in 1945 
where it won the New York Critics' 
Circle Award for best plav. 

Dr. Sarah Burroughs, Lan- 
guage Arts Department head, ex- 
plained that the play reflects "the 



Students of Northwestern and 
the Louisiana School for Math, Sci- 
ences and the Arts will be admitted 
free by presenting their student ID 
card. Smith said some of the funds 
used for the production of the Artist 
Series comes from the student activity 
fee each full-time Northwestern stu 
dent pays at the beginning of the 
semester. "It is student fees that 
largely pays for all of this," Smith said. 



Students address SGA election issues. 

See pages five and seven. 



PAGE 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



OCTOBER 13, 1987 OCTOE 



NEWS 



ELE 



Robberies reported at Alumni Center/BSU 



— ~— 



By USA DARDEN 
Managing Editor 

The Alumni Center, located on 
College Avenue, reported a break-in 
and robbery to University Police last 
week. 

According to Elise James, direc- 
tor of External Affairs, the theft took 
place between 9 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 4, 
and 7:30 a.m. Monday. 



James first noticed the robbery 
when she entered the kitchen and 
noticed the liquor cabinets had been 
pried open and the contents missing. 
She immediately called University 
Police. 

James said about $75 in liquor, 
which is used for alumni functions, 



was taken from the building. 

Entrance into the building was 
gained at the rear of the house. The 
robbers kicked in a French-style door 
on the sun porch and crawled in 
through the hole. Damages to the 
door were estimated at about $30. 



The Alumni Center, con- 
structed in 1927, was orginally the 
President's Cottage for Northwest- 
ern. 

University Police Chief 
Crawford Ficklin said the department 
has one strong suspect in the robbery 
who is currently under surveillance. 

Ficklin was uncertain if this 
robbery was connected with a similar 
theft that occurred in the Student 



Union Sept. 10. Robbers in that inci- 
dent broke into the Student Union but 
took only 23 cents from the bookstore 
and several cans of beer from Union 
Station. 

Ficklin said if the current sus- 
pect is arrested, questioning of the 
Student Union break-in would take 
place. 

Also reported on Sunday night, 
Oct. 4, was an attempted break-in at 
the Baptist Student Union (BSU) lo- 
cated on College Avenue across from 
Watson Library. 

According to Brad Bates, BSU 
resident host, someone attempted to 
enter the building at about 10:30 p.m. 

Bates heard someone rattling 



the back door of the BSU but thought 
it was only a friend coming to visit. 
Bates next heard the window shatter. 
When he went to investigate, the in- 
truders ran away. Bates then called 
the police. 

Although nothing was taken 
from the BSU, about S35 in damages 
was reported from the attempted 
break-in. 

Ficklin said no other major inci- 
dents have been reported to the Uni- 
versity Police. Several incidents of 
attempted car break-ins have been 
reported although nothing has been 
stolen. 

"The semester is finally calming 
down and the parking problems are 
getting progressively better," Ficklin 
said. 



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Northwestern sorority to host regional leadership school 



By SONYA RIGAUD 
Staff Writer 

The Northwestern chapter of 
Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority, Alpha 
Zeta, will be hosting the sorority's 
Regional Leadership School (RLS) 
this weekend. 

According to Laurie LeBlanc, 
Alpha Zeta's RLS chairman, the pur- 
pose of the program is to teach Tri- 
Sigma ritual, introduce rushing tech- 
niques and promote sisterhood. 

LeBlanc said more than 130 
Sigma women are expected to partici- 
pate in the school with Tri-Sigmas 
from all across the nation arriving in 
Natchitoches Friday night. The Alpha 

NSU Republicans 
sponsor speech 

By GREG KENDRICK 
Editor 

Northwestern's College Re- 
publicans are sponsoring a speech by 
lieutenant governor candidate Paul 
Hardy 3:30 p.m. Thursday in Room 
321 of the Student Union. 

Hardy, who switched from the 
Democratic to the Republican Party a 
year ago, served as state senator of 
Iberia and St. Martin parishes in 1971, 
as secretary of state in 1976, and as 
secretary of the State Department of 
Transportation and Development 
from 1980-84. 

According to campaign infor- 
mation released by Hardy, Louisiana 
had more than a $1.2 million return 
after Hardy's first year as secretary of 
state. The information also states that 
Hardy reduced his $4 million budget 
by 28 percent, the largest reduction 
ever in that office. 

Hardy earned a B.A. from the 
University of Southwestern Louisi- 
ana in 1965 and a juris doctorate de- 
gree from Loyola Law School in 1966. 
Hardy's business interests include 
attorney at law and consultant for 
financial, governmental and insur- 
ance institutions; associate producer 
and actor in the motion picture "Beli- 
zaire the Cajun" released in 1986; 
president of Saint Agnes Nursing 
Home Inc. in Breaux Bridge; vice 
president of Grant Manor Nursing 
Homes Inc. in Colfax and Saint 
Martinville; and member of the Board 
of Directors for Saint Martin Bank and 
Trust Company in Saint Martinville. 

Clint Person, Northwestern's 
College Republicans chapter presi- 
dent and youth coordinator for guber- 
natorial candidate Robert Livingston, 
said the College Republicans chapter 
is a subgroup of the Louisiana Young 
Republicans Federation and has been 
recharted this year. 

Person said functions of the 
College Republicans include working 
for different republican candidate 
campaigns throughout the state and 
coordinating republican election ac- 
tivities on campus. 

"We have accumulated about 
50 members 4n three weeks time," 
Person said. 

Person said the next College 
■ Republicans meeting will be held 4 
p.m. Tuesday in room 321 of the Stu- 
dent Union. Any individual inter- 
ested in joining is welcome to attend. 
The purpose of Tuesday's meeting is 
to coordinate activities for the Hardy 
speech. 



Zetas will host a reception party at 
their house on Greek Hill. 

According to LeBlanc, the 
Alpha Zeta Chapter was chosen to 
host the leadership school because of 
its strong standing in the eyes of Tri- 
Sigma national officers. The chapter 
was also chosen because of its success- 
ful rush programming. 

Cindy Ross, Alpha Zeta treas- 
urer, said, "We really have great rush 
parties, especially Roaring 20s. It's 
really a lot of fun and the rushees love 
it." Ross said the Roaring 20s party is 
significant because the Alpha Zeta 
Chapter of Tri-Sigma was founded in 
1928. 




According to Brenda Grayson, 
Roaring 20s party chairman, the 
Northwestern chapter will provide its 
guests will a complete list of decora- 
tions, food, dances and music needed 
for the party. 

"We will have an outline stating 
exactly how everything should be 
done so that the other chapters can 
start doing Roaring 20s if they want," 
Grayson said. 

LeBlanc said the Alpha Zetas 
will demonstrate this party to the vis- 
iting Sigmas on Saturday. In addition 
to attending the rush party workshop, 
Sigmas will attend a variety of work- 
shops. 



ARA Food Service will cater a 
banquet for the group Saturday night 
in the Purple and White Room. Fol- 
lowing the banquet, an Inspiration 
Ceromony will be held. 

Activities for Sunday include a 
ritual workshop for initiates, a pledge 

orientation and a luncheon at 
Lasyone's. 

"I believe this weekend will be 
a growing experience. The various 
educational programs will give both 
pledges and actives insight that is 
paramount in a good Tri-Sigma chap- 
ter," LeBlanc said. 



Tuesday 

11:00-11:30 

MatchitochesCity Police; 

video presentation 

12:00-12:30 

Rapides CDU 

Topic matter: Cocaine 

1:00 Bruce Copple 

LSMSA Counselor 

1 :30 Dr. William Zeiehner, 

vascular surgeon 

2:00 Lillian Cohen, 

Questions and Ansxvers 

Wednesday 

11:00 

Mike Henry* 

Legal Drinking Age 

11:30 

Lillian Cohen 

Questions and Answers 

11-00-12:30 

Rapides CDU 

Marijuana 

1:00-1:30 

Rudolph Hamilton 
Drugs, Alcohol and Crime 



2:00 

Linda Chance 

ALANOX 

230 

Lt. Askew 
University Police 

Thursday 

11:00 University Police 
1:00 

DeWayne Book 
Substance Abuse Qinic 
1:30 

Bruce Copple 
LSMSA Counselor 

2O0 

Linda Chance 
2:30 

Dr. William Zickner 



KIMB 



Other speakers 

may fill in 

on related topics 




Hardy 



Before you choose a long distance 
service, take a close look. 



YVET 




Mr. 



You may be thinking about 
choosing one of the newer 
carriers over AT&T in order to 
save money. 

Think again. 

Since January 1987, AT&T's 
rates have dropped more than 
15% for direct-dialed out-of- 
state calls. So they're lower than 
you probably realize. For infor- 
mation on specific rates, you 
can call us at 1 800 222-0300. 

And AT&T offers clear long 
distance connections, operator 
assistance, 24-hour customer 
service, and immediate credit 
for wrong numbers. Plus, you 
can use AT&T to call from 
anywhere to anywhere, all over 
the United States and to over 
250 countries. 

You might be surprised at 
how good a value AT&T really 
is. So before you choose a 
long distance company, pick 
up the phone. 



jero: 





AT&T 

The right choice. 



tiortl 

V CHRISTI RH 
'cm Writer 

Northwe 
lluad has un 
Ganges for 
Ganges inch 
"Uforms, an in 
fav managem 
Placed 1 
'ill Brent of I 
Apartment, tl 
tached by Bi 
heerleading 
emale memt 
ssisted by B 3 



3, 1987 OCTOBER 13, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 3 



ELECTIONS 



ISA! 

OF 

RY 

r CARD 
1ED 
_L: 
02 



Miss NSU nominees 



(vote for one) 



NESS WEEf 



ice 



linic 





KIMBERLY ANTEE 



DEBBIE CABLE 



a* 



MARTI ELKINS 




RACHEL HEIDER MONTE JOHNSON 



:ers 






NO 
PICTURE 
SUBMITTED 




YVETTE JORDAN DARCY LEBLANC 



BERTHA MAXIE MARSHA McLAMORE KAREN SPARKS 



Mr. NSU nominees 



(vote for one) 



)Ut 





s 
in 

han 

ar- 
i 

00. 

ng 
tor 
r 

lit 

u 

iver 
r 

at 

liy 





NO 
PICTURE 
SUBMITTED 



JEROME COX 



lis— , -00' «^* ? 



DAVE DECUIR 



DWAYNE DUPUIY DEWEY GRANGER 



DONALD HALL 





\ Si: I Ml 

STEVE HORTON JOHN KULAKOWSKI JIMMIE MCCORMICK TODD STERLING 



Northwestern cheerleading squad undergoes changes 



ce. 



VCHRISTI RHYMES 
taff Writer 

Northwestern's cheerleading 
buad has undergone a variety of 
Wees for the 1987-88 season. 
Changes include new cheers, new 
'niforms, an increase in members and 
tew management. 

Placed under the direction of 
*ill Brent of Northwestern's music 
Apartment, the 17-member squad is 
bached by Brad Arnold, Universal 
heerleading Association instructor. 
*male members of the squad are 
ssisted by Barbara Hernandez, a lo- 



cal dance and gymnastics instructor. 

According to Arnold, the squad 
has changed the style of cheering to 
promote crowd participation and has 
changed the name to "yell leaders" to 
accommodate the new style. 

The 1987-88 squad consists of 13 
women or pom-pon girls and four 
men known as yell leaders. Although 
the majority of the squad are first-time 
members, five of the women were on 
last year's cheering squad. 

According to Arnold, the squad 
practices two hours a day promoting 
Northwestern spirit. The squad alter- 



nates days of working out and practic- 
ing game cheers. Being a new squad, 
the yell leaders also spend an hour 
each day working on stunts. The 
squad will be incorporating stunts 
into cheers as the season progresses. 

Yell leaders believe the changes 
have affected crowd participation. 
"From when I sat in the stands last 
year, I believe that participation in the 
crowd has increased 100 percent," yell 
leader Bodein Rachal said. 

Other students have also noticed 
increased crowd involvement in sup- 
porting the Demons. 



"I think there's been more sup- 
port this year. Everyone used to go 
home on the weekends and now ev- 
eryone seems to be staying for the 
game," Van Bush said. 

In addition to spending several 
hours a day practicing, many of the 
members are involved in a variety of 
campus activities including fraterni- 
ties, sororities, Student Government 
Association an d Student Activities 
Board. Of the male members, two are 
ex-football players. 

"Having former athletes as a 
part of the yel] leader squad has estab- 



lished a closer relationship with the 
football team," Rachal said. 

Yell leader John Kingsley said, 
"Being an ex-football player, people 
appreciate the fact that those of us 
cheering are in touch with the game. 
We know how much time and effort is 
put into practice and how hard it is to 
be a football player." 

The improved relationship be- 
tween the football team and squad 
members also enhances crowd par- 
ticipation. "We've learned a lot from 
the yell leaders that were football 
players for NSU," yell leader Shawn 



American 
view 

of Korea 

By BERTHA MAXIE 
Staff Writer 

During the past summer I had 
the opportunity to spend five weeks 
in Seoul, Korea, while participating in 
Cadet Troop Leader Training (CTLT), 
an Army ROTC program. 

CTLT is a long-running pro- 
gram which recently implemented 
active units in Korea. The program is 
designed to give cadets experience in 
leadership and in the role as an Army 
officer. 

My decision to participate in 
CTLT was what took me to South 
Korea, Land of the Morning Calm. 
Although my stay in Korea gave me 
vital insight into the duties of a U.S. 
Army officer, which I will be in a few 
short months, it also taught me a lot 
more. 

The time I spent in the Republic 
of Korea were five of the most eye- 
opening weeks I have ever experi- 
enced. The Korean culture is a color- 
ful one that conflicts with the 
country's controversial political state. 

Several years ago, South Korea 
was thrust from its ancient, tradi- 
tional ways into the mainstream of the 
modern world. It has recovered from 
culture shock quickly and is now 
making giant strides in creating its 
own place in the modern world's 
society. 

The Korean people are hard- 
working and dedicated. It was amaz- 
ing to watch how they combined tra- 
ditional ways of making a living with 
modern ways. Examples of this could 
be seen early in the morning when 
tiny old men would push carts loaded 
with goods through the modern 
streets of Seoul or when street ven- 
dors sold traditional Korean food off a 
cart just down the street from a Burger 
King. 

Seoul, the capital of South Ko- 
rea, is a thriving modern city with 
more than eight million people. Look- 
ing out the window of a modern lux- 
ury hotel, clusters of small traditional 
homes surrounded by modern build- 
ings and highways can be seen. 

The streets are forever full of 
people and vehicles. Even lateat night 
or early in the morning it's possible to 
get caught in traffic. During certain 
times of the day a standard two-lane 
highway would automatically be- 
come a six-lane expressway. Korea is 
the only place I know of where U- 
turns are a common practice. 

The streets are not the only 
places that are crowded. Sidewalks 
and shops are packed both day and 
night with people rushing from one 
place to another, street vendors with 
goods on push carts reaching out and 
grabbing for customers, and Ameri- 
cans out for a good bargain or a good 
time. They can be found at any time of 
the day or night. 

South Korea is fast becoming 
Americanized. Korean youth can be 
seen sporting the fads and hairstyles 
of teenage Americans. In the after- 
noons they gather in the Korean ver- 
sion of Burger King or Kentucky Fried 
Chicken to discuss the latest record 
album or movie. Koreans are con- 
stantly exposed to Americans mainly 
because of the large number of mili- 
tary personnel located there. Not only 
do the youth model themselves after 
military personnel but also after the 
dependents of the the personnel. 

Perhaps it is the large number of 
Americans present which makes Ko- 
rea the Americanized place it is. In 
downtown shopping areas vendors 
are aiming sales pitches at Americans 
because they are the ones with the 
money. Every part of the Koreans' 
lives is being turned into tourist at- 
tractions for the sole purpose of mak- 
ing money. The economy depends 
largely on the American people and 
the American dollar that they bring 
with them. Americans love to spend 
money and the people of Korea are 
aware of the fact. 

Korean youths are in college 
studying business administration 
and marketing. Although males are 
required to spend two years in the 
R.O.K Army, they return to school as 
soon as they can to study how to make 

See Korea 
page eight 



Bailey said. 

"After the Arkansas State game, 
some of the football players took the 
time to tell us they could hear us 
cheering and it really meant a lot to 
me," yell leader Dana Dooley said of 
the football team's reaction. 



Rachal said people in the stands 
are beginning to take notice of the yell 
leading squad and are beginning to 
participate. "After all, we're all striv- 
ing for the same goal — to make NSU a 
winner," he said. 



PAGE 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



OCTOBER 13, 1987 QCTO 



NEWS 



NSU construction continues 



By MICHELLE WEEGO 
Staff Writer 

Northwestern is continuing 
construction around campus in an 
effort to improve both the artistic and 
functional value of the university. All 
construction and renovations, includ- 
ing the recently poured concrete side- 
walk in front of Kyser Hall, are part of 
a master plan to better both the school 
and its environment. 

Loran Lindsey, Physical Plant 
director, said campus improvements 
are part of the utilities master plan. 
The plan is a series of projects divided 
into phases aimed at improving vari- 
ous aspects of the school. 

Although plans were begun in 
1977, Lindsey said actual work was 
instigated five years ago. The plan is 
currently in the last stages of develop- 
ment. The entire plan of modernizing 
services and equipment will cost an 
estimated $9 million dollars. 
Northwestern's Planning, Construc- 
tion and Maintenance departments 
are responsible for the many improve- 
ments included in the master plan, 
Lindsey said. 

Recent major renovation proj- 
ects include Boozeman Hall, formerly 
Louisiana Hall. Boozeman was reno- 
vated this summer at a cost of 
$600,000, Lindsey said. In addition to 
renovation, Boozeman received a 
new coat of paint and was redeco- 
rated with older reupholstered furni- 
ture. 

Presently the Warren Easton 
Elementary Lab School is being refur- 
bished. Although fourth and fifth 
grades have moved into the school 
from the P.E. Majors' Building, re- 
maining grades will not move in until 
the building is completed in the fall of 
1988. 

Also under construction at 
this time are the President's Room 



and the Cane River Room located on 
the second floor of the Student Union. 
The rooms are being renovated in 
order to create medium-sized recep- 
tion and dining areas for banquets 
and meetings. 

'The Student Union is 21 years 
old. It's about time NSU had some 
nice meeting rooms there," Lindsey 
said. 'The President's Room will be 
slightly smaller than the ballroom and 
ideal for the eating-meeting type 
gathering." 

Also under construction is 
Northwestern's steam system. As a 
final phase of the master plan, the 
system is undergoing a steam re- 
habilitaion overhaul. 

"We're having a lot of prob- 
lems with the old line. The steam sys- 
tem was built in 1939 and we have to 
redo a lot of it," Lindsey said. 

The $2 million construction 
project includes replacing many of the 
steam supply lines which are respon- 
sible for heat and hot water in all the 
buildings and installing satellite boil- 
ers. The phase includes placing new 
lines underground with a circulation 
system so the campus can reuse the 
steam and chemicals. As a result of 
this project, maintenance had to re- 
pair part of the sidewalk in front of 
Kyser. 

In addition to construction 
purposes, other sidewalks around 
campus were replaced due to exces- 
sive cracking. New sidewalks were 
placed between buildings. For ex- 
ample, new sidewalks were laid be- 
tween Kyser Hall and Watson Library 
and also between Fornet Hall and 
Boozeman Dorm. 

"Students were leaving paths 

See Construction 
page seven 



Greek mixer party slated 



By SARAH BULLER 
Staff Writer 

Panhellenic, Junior Panhellenic 
and the InterFraternity Council (IFC) 
are sponsoring an all-Greek mixer 8 
p.m. Wednesday at the Recreation 
Complex. Held in conjunction with 
Alcohol Awareness Week, the mixer 
will be a toga party. 

Northwestern's Greek organi- 
zations are holding the mixer in an 
effort to make members aware of the 
effects of alcohol and to stress respon- 
sible drinking. 

Although alcohol will be 
served at the mixer, non-alcoholic 
drinks will be available. A Breatha- 
lyzer test will be administered to 
those drinking alcoholic drinks. 
Panhellenic will hold a signature test 
in which participants must sign their 
names each time they get a new drink. 
The signature test demonstrates the 
effects alcohol has on motor control. 

In addition to tests, rides back 
to the campus will be available for 
guests drinking alcohol. Police offi- 
cers will be on duty at the party to help 
determine when students have had . 



The keys to 
responsible decisions 




When it comes to alcohol abuse - you 
hold the keys to prevention 



Support 



National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week 



too much to drink. 

Marjorie Poss, Panhellenic 
adviser, believes the mixer will help 
bring Greek organizations together, 
both black and white. Each group will 
have three to five monitors to watch 
their members. 

'This is the first mixer of this 
semester. We want everyone to have 
fun but be responsible," Poss said. 

"If you are Greek and you see 
that one of your brothers or sisters is 
drinking too much, then be a friend 
and take care of him." Poss said. 

M'lissa Harkins, president of 
Junior Panhelinic, said, "I think the 
mixer is an excellent idea. It pulls all 
the Greeks together. I think that drunk 
driving is a major problem among the 
Greeks and this should give them a 
chance to have fun in a safe way." 

Jenifer Walsh, a Sigma Sigma 
Sigma pledge from Baton Rouge, said, 
"I think this mixer will be an excelllent 
way to have fun for all Greeks if they 
will take advantage of this opportu- 
nity. However, I feel that afterward 
people will go back to being just as 
irresponsible as before." 



Hootenanny musical event begins Qq 



By CHARLIE MOORE 
Staff Writer 

The Louisiana Folklife Center is 
sponsoring a series of musical events 
known as a "Hootenanny" at 11:30 
a.m. on Tuesdays in Kyser Audito- 
rium. 

A hootenanny is a singing or 
instrumental event open to anyone 
wanting to play, participate or listen. 
The program is being coordinated by 
Monte and Marsha Brown of the 
Louisiana Folklife Center. 

According to Monte Brown, the 
program is open for acoustical instru- 
ments only and no electrical amplifi- 
ers or p.a. systems will be used. Many 
different styles of music such as folk, 
blues, bluegrass and ethnic music are 
associated with the hootenanny. 

Hootenannys got their start 
back in the mid-1950s in coffeehouses 
and college campuses across the na- 
tion. The musical style grew out of the 
poet-music scene that was popular 
during that era, according to Brown. 

During the 1960s a folk music 



revival took place and the hoote- 
nanny grew popular once again 
especially in the Greenwich Village 
area of New York and San Francisco. 
The hootenanny was similar to a tal- 
ent show which gave people the op- 
portunity to play their latest songs, 
gain exposure or just hang back and 
play their old favorites. Brown said. 

"It was sort of a singing move- 
ment. More people got together to 
sing and play instruments, whereas 
people today just listen to the radio," 
Monte Brown said. 

The Louisiana Folklife Center is 
also responsible for holding the 
Natchitoches Folk Festival each sum- 
mer. The Folklife Center likes to use 
local talent during the Folk Festival. 
The hootenanny gives musicians a 
chance to preview their music and 
possibly get an offer to play during the 
Folk Festival. 

The series begins Oct. 13. Indi- 
viduals or groups wanting to reserve 
a spot on the program should call 357- 
4332 or go by the Folklife Center in 
Room 213 in Kyser Hall. 



POTPOURRI ORGANIZATION PHOTOS 



POTPOURRI ORGANIZATION/ 
GREEK SCHEDULE 
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1987 
ALUMNI CENTER 

4:00 ACS 

4:05 ALPHA BETA ALPHA 
4:10 ALPHA ETA RHO 
4:15 ALPHA KAPPA DELTA 
4:25 ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA 
4:30 ANTHROPOLOGY CLUB 
4:35 ANIMAL HEALTH TECH. 

ASSOC. 
4:40 ASSOC. FOR STUDENTS 

ATRISTS 
4:45 BSU 

4:50 BETA BETA BETA 
4:55 BETA GAMMA PSI 
5:00 BLACK KNIGHTS 
5:05 COUNCIL OF YE REVELS 
5:10 CHURCH OF CHRIST 

DEVOTIONAL 
5:15 CORPS OF CADETS 
5:20 ASSOC. OF THE US ARMY 
5:25 DELTA PSI KAPPA 
5:30 GERMAN CLUB 
5:35 DPMA 
5:40 FWCC 

5:45 GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY 

5:55 IOTA LAMBDA SIGMA 

6:00 PHI ETA SIGMA 

6:05 MICROBIOLOGY CLUB 

6:10 NACUS 

6:15 NCAS 

6:20 NAIT 

6:25 KAPPA OMICRON PHI 
6:30 ORENTEERING CLUB 
6:35 WESLEY FOUNDATION 
6:40 PENECOSTAL FELLOWSHIP 
6:45 FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN 

STUDENTS 
6:50 IEEE 



POTPOURRI ORGANIZATION/ 
GREEKS PICTURE SCHEDULE 
WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 14, 1987 
CHAPLIN'S LAKE - ACROSS 
FROM COLISIUM 

4:00 PERIAKTOI 

4:05 PHI ALPHA THFTA 

4:10 PHI EPSILON KAPPA 

4:15 PHI KAPPA PHI 

4:20 PHI MU ALPHA SINFONIA 

4:25 LE CERCLE FRANCAIS 

4:30 PRSSA 

4:35 PHI BETA LAMBDA 

4:40 PSYCHOLOGY CLUB 

4:45 PSI CHI 

4:50 RANGER TEAM 

4:55 RIFLE TEAM 

5:00 SAM 

5.05 SIGMA ALPHA IOTA 
5:10 SIGMA DELTA CHI 
5:15 SNA 
5:20 SLAF 

525 LA HOME ECONOMICS ASSOC. 
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>, 1987 OCTOBER 13, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 5 



EDITORIAL 



Commissioner addresses editor 



the hoote- 
mce again 
■ich Village ; 
n Francisco. 
Oar to a tal- 
aple the op- , 
atest songs, 
ig back and 
Irown said, 
iging move- 
together to 
its, whereas 
a the radio," 

life Center is 
lolding the 
i\ each sum- 
likes to use 
oik Festival, 
musicians a 
music and 
yduringthe 

>ct. 13. Indi- 
ig to reserve 
uld call 357- 
fe Center in 



to Whom it may concern, 

This letter was submitted as a 
Letter to the Editor. However, the is- 
sue at hand has been so grossly blown 
out of proportion that this is to ad- 
dress any and all students who have 
been affected by it. 

To you, Mr. Kendrick, my first 
observation is that you have handled 
quite poorly the problem you obvi- 
ously have. Not only have you been so 
unprofessional as to use your position 
as editor of the student newspaper to 
voice your own biases (sic), but you 
have made quite painfully conspicu- 
ous the campaign which you and your 
cronies have against "the Cox broth- 
ers," as they put it. I tend to wonder 
how many quality news stories have 
gone down the drain because of the 
inches you have devoted to berating 
your own student government. But it 
is not really the student government, 
is it? Let's get to brass tacks, Mr. Ken- 
irick. The whole subject of your edito- 
rials, front-page leads and everything 
in between has been "the Cox broth- 
,ers." Some would-be journalist com- 
mented on the scarcity of "those of us 
brave enough to write editorials." On 
my part, sir, it is not bravery which has 



shame to waste space explaining the 
mechanics of voting and elections, 
when our SG A has an open-door pol- 
icy. Any student who has enough 
concern about these processes is wel- 
come to educate himself or herself on 
the matter. A more significant reason 
is that I have done nothing but carry 
out my duties in the office to which I 
have been elected for three consecu- 
tive years in the most professional, 
decent manner possible. Where no 
crime has been commited (sic), there 
is nothing to explain or to justify. It is 
nothing short of amazing to me how a 
vast majority of people will not carry 
out their own responsibilities con- 
cerning elections, then insist upon 
starting over merely to satisfy their 
own juvenile desires. If these people 
have half a brain in the right place, 
they know who they are. It is also 
amazing to me how people in posi- 
tions of leadership can make state- 
ments of such blatant hypocrisy. And 
you. Miss Delozia, are probably still 
unaware of how you have been used 
in this process. 

Everyone has a way of holding 
his breath until someone is angry 
enough to blurt it out. It has been 



been lacking for the past three years hinted at too long already. You say 

tince these attacks began, but the will- you do not consider this a racist issue, 

ingness to sink to the level of myene- Mr. Kendrick. If in fact you do not, 

mies. I am "brave enough," and com- perhaps you should have your eyes 

petent enough - to write an editorial, examined. The sad thing is, it only 

fir, if you are brave enough to print it becomes racial when one side lets its 

iccurately, professional (sic), in con- hatred surface for the other sidc.and 

text and without erroneous quotes members of that side let their hatred 

which characterize your operation in for and jealousy of each other divide 

the Current Sauce office. Here it is, friendships, create scandals and cor- 

Mr. Kendrick, -student body- void of rupt student business, 
words such as "damn" and "crap." There was no mention of 

Fortunately, the Lord has blessed me "black" and "white" before Miss De- 

jrith the abitlity to express myself lozia stated her mistaken supposition 

without the use of the undignified that I wanted to be the only black on 

jargon you have used. It would seem a the Mr. NSU ballot. The second men- 

Lessons in politics, media offered 



tion came when you agreed with her 
in the same October 6 edition of the 
Current Sauce . 

I have no problem with black, 
white, red, yellow or brown packag- 
ing among human beings - for that is 
exactly what we truly are - beneath the 
packaging. ..although some may 
choose to act differently. Some three 
years ago I campaigned for an office 
which I hoped would be an outlet for 
my concern and desire for excellence 
and involvement in NSU's student 
government. The students chose me 
for that office - three times. Despite the 
strife, envy, prejudice and political 
power swings which have been at 
work since I first took office, I would 
be less than sincere not to continue in 
my purpose. Mr. Kendrick, I have not 
dug my own grave, and you cannot 
dig it for me, in spite of what you may 
fathom. No, I have no intentions of 
resigning as Commissioner of Elec- 
tions. I have a job to do. In reference 
to your October 6 statement that I 
"placed myself on the (Mr. NSU) bal- 
lot, "I was nominated onto the ballot. 
That fact and the fact that it is my job 
to oversee elections have nothing to 
do with each other. 

This is my statement, Mr. 
Kendrick... for now. I dare you to give 
it the fair coverage it deserves - uned- 
ited and just as I have written it. Blow 
the dust off a journalism textbook that 
might be lying around your office, or 
ask the Current Sauce advisor to do 
so. I'm sure it instructs on the ethics of 
good journalism. It should also dis- 
cuss slander, defamation of character, 
sensationalism and yellow jounalism, 
as well as their consequences. 

God bless, 
Jerome Cox 
SGA Commissioner of Elections 



ly LISA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 

Run Jane run. 
See Jane run. 

Today, class, we will open our 
primers for two very important les- 
ions — politics and the media. 

First we will cover politics. We 
must understand how politics 
(perate in order to gain a better un- 
derstanding of the purpose of the 
'inedia. Please reach into your desks 
*nd remove the dust covered books. 

Politics at Northwestern can be 
defined as the body of people called 
me Student Government Association. 
Can you say Student Government 
Associaton? This body of people is 
Elected by the students to represent 
me students. Normally student gov- 
ftnments are active, productive 
groups which operate in the students' 
lest interest. However, there are 
fanes when some groups become 



first page with big headlines. The 
news story must report actual events 
and back up each statement with facts, 
figures and quotes. A reporter's 
number one priority is to take accu- 
rate notes and present the news story 
in an unbiased manner. It makes the 
politician angry and defensive when 
he/she realizes he/she has been 
caught in a "mistruth" or realizes that 
the statement he/she made sounds 
silly. 

The editorial, on the other hand, 
is the only chance that the writer (or 
would-be journalist if you must) has 
to present his/her own personal opin- 
ions. On a more elementary level, 
personal opinions are usually biased. 
The editorials have more of a bite to 
them since the writer has a broader 
legal area in which to make accusa- 
tions and to point out existing prob- 
lems. 

Also found on the editorial page 
are letters to the editor. Letters to the 



Jogged down in petty problems and editor ^ an { ^ q{ ^ 

•he only thing they produce are chaos . ... _„_. 



paper since it allows anyone to make 
a printed statement. Editors and his/ 
her cronies are usually begging for 
letters to the editor and turn no letters 
away. Some editors even run weekly 



tad frustration. Would-be leaders 
become more involved in personal 
iain and power struggles. This is 
fchen the media comes in to play. 

Now class please open your aski student - tQ ^ 

woks on media. Can you say Current ^ 

'•Sauce? The media exemplifies a basic 
ilreedom as protected by the First 
Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. 
Ihe media becomes exteremely im- 
;portant when the public suspects that 
'the politicians are getting out of hand. 
Ihe media has a dual role in this prob- 
lem — they must make accurate and 



such letters. 

Now class, as you can see the 
politicians and journalists are walk- 
ing a precarious line. When the politi- 
cans are doing well, all is fine. How- 
ever, if the politicians are failing to 
uphold their obligations, things get 
touchy between the two groups. It is 
the politician's responsibility to serve 



•truthful reports (commonly called a the ^ ^ as j, fa thg j^^i^,. 

Hews story) and braver and bolder responsib ii ity t0 act as a public watch- 
»rticles (commonly called an edito- dog Ag a resuU of the tWQ factionS/ 

,fla1 )- thick skins must be developed by 
The news story is found on the [hQse ^ the public eye . 

r- 



Many times as the plot thickens, 
a red herring is tossed into the scene 
by the politician. (For those of you 
who didn't study your political 
lingo — a red herring is a topic com- 
pletely off the subject which is tossed 
in to change the direction or line of fire 
from the politican him/herself). It is 
the reporter's duty to ignore the red 
herring and stick with the more rele- 
vant subject at hand. 



Many times the reporter pres- 
ents facts, which when printed in their 
stark reality are shocking to the politi- 
cian. It is quite unsettling for the poli- 
tician to see his/her bad performance 
record printed in newsprint for the 
world to see. For example, imagine a 
situation where a large number of 
elections had to be reheld due to in- 
competenceor silly mistakes. This fact 
would be especially hard for the poli- 
tician to swallow when it is his/her 
major and only elected responsibility 
in the governing group. Situations 
such as these serve only to increase the 
tension between the two groups. 

OK class, your lesson for the day 
is over. Don't forget to do your home- 
work and study hard. 

On a serious note — after last 
night's attempt to correct past prob- 
lems, I can see the SGA is unwilling to 
make any improvements and would 
rather hold elections that must be 
reheld. The group is spinning their 
wheels and getting nowhere. I myself 
am guilty of kicking a dead dog. It is 
obvious the SGA has no intentions of 
correcting their problem and would 
rather continue the unpleasant expe- 
riences. As for myself, I am tired of the 
issue. Elections at Northwestern are 
like aerobics in hell — never ending. 



\W\ll II I I 111// 




Alcohol 
Awareness 
Week 




Biff and Skip well 
l^now +he effects 

of Alcohol 



(mum. fJJ 7<y(n 



Senator's point of view 



Dear Editor, 

As an SGA senator I have had 
the privilege of representing you, the 
students of Northwestern. I know that 
many of you are concerned with the 
state of our student government at 
this time. There are those involved in 
the SGA (many in the executive 
branch) whose only intent is to serve 
themselves instead of the voters who 
placed them in office. 

I am writing this not only to 
Greg Kendrick but also to the student 
body to assure you that concerned 
representatives are working on your 
behalf. Northwestern should not be a 
battleground between comic book 
characters. One objective of a student 
government association is to work 
together to bring about what the stu- 
dents want and need. I feel we are not 
accomplishing a thing by jumping 
down each other's throats — whether 
in an official meeting or in the school 
newspaper. 



I give you my promise to try to 
work along with the other student 
leaders as well as members of the 
administration in attempts to solve 
the students' concerns. I agree that 
something needs to be done about the 
unnecessary problems revolving 
around the lack of good leadership, 
but there remains (as I have said) 
thoseof us who are truly committed to 
the job at hand — taking care of the 
students of Northwestern State Uni- 
versity. 

At this point, I would like to 
stress that the SGA can only find solu-. 
tions to those problems brought be- 
fore us. If you, the student, have a 
concern, notify myself or one of my 
colleages. We cannot change the situ- 
ation if we do not know what the 
problem is. I will be happy to work 
with anyone dealing with any prob- 
lem. 

Andy Harrison 
Senator-at-Large 
SGA Office: 357-4501 



Writer stresses change 



Dear Editor, 

I am writing to address a situ- 
ation that has been in deterioration for 
a long time at Northwestern. The situ- 
ation is the university's election pro- 
cedures handled by Jerome Cox, 
commissioner of elections. 

Students, can you remember 
the last time an election wasn't re- 
called? Students, can you remember 
the last productive thing the Student 
Government Association did? 

The most recent examples of 
election screw-ups are the Homecom- 
ing Court and the Mr. and Miss NSU 
and State Fair Court balloting. As you 
know, Homecoming Court votes 
were tallied and then recalled because 
of incompetence on behalf of the elec- 
tion committee. One girl's name had 
been left off the Shreveport ballot and 
"oops" it had to be done over again. 
Northwestern was represented 
Homecoming weekend by three Phi 
Mu's, five Tri-Sigma's and one inde- 
pendent young lady. Out of all the 
other sororities on campus as well as 
independent ladies, how could this 
happen Jerome Cox? 

That brings me to the point of 
the Mr. and Miss NSU and State Fair 
Court balloting. In case you don't al- 
ready know, some students were 



slighted by the original balloting. It 
seems as if ole Mr. Jerome Cox, 
commissioner of elections and coinci- 
dentally a Mr. NSU nominee, handled 
the ballots without the help of his 
election board. Last Tuesday a list of 
the Mr. and Miss NSU nominees came 
out; however, I believe it was not the 
students' nominees but rather 
Jeromes's view of the nominations. 
Now the Mr. and Miss NSU ballot has 
changed because of an appeal by 
some students who knew the ballots 
were wrong. Why weren't the ballots 
handled fairly in the beginning Jer- 
ome Cox? 

Students, it's time for a 
change. We pay for the SGA executive 
officer's scholarships. The president 
gets a full scholarship and the rest of 
the executive board gets half scholar- 
ships. Why are we paying Jerome Cox 
for screwing up? The SGA has not 
been able to hold a decent election 
since Cox's term as commissioner of 
elections began. 

It's time for a change. I think 
we, the student body, need to move 
for an impeachment and revocation of 
Jerome Cox's scholarship. Someone 
else on the SGA can do the commis- 
sioner of elections job fairly. Lets give 
them a chance. 

Todd Sterling 



CURRENT SAUCE 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 



USA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 



KIRK COPEIAND 

Sports Editor 



MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
SARAH BULLER 

CHRIS HUNT 
BERTHA MAXIE 
DAN MEDUN 
CHARLIE MOORE 
CHRISTI RHYMES 
SONYA RIGAUD 
MICHELLE WE EGO 
Staff Writers 



ALLEN EVANS 

Advertising Manager 



EDD LEE 

Circulation/Distribution 



TEDRiS SMITH 
WILLIAM FRANCO 

Photographers 



TOM WHITEHEAD 

Adviser 



Letters continued 

on page seven 



Do you feel the students of Scholars' College have more 

privileges than the students of Northwestern? 




Saynell Old we11 
K Office Adm. 
Hunpti 

"Yes, because they are trea ted as 
kllege students and we are treated as 
Vgh school students." 



Lyndon Posey 

2-1, Industrial Tech. 

Bastrop 

"Yes, because they have better 
dorm facilities that should be given to 
upperclassmen." 



Donna Tatum 
1-1 Fashion Mdse. 
Boyce 

"No. / believe that NS U remem- 
bers who their students are." 



Kim Slaton 

4-1, Interi 0r Design 

Rodessa 

"There is no comparison be- 
tween ihe forms that the Scholars' 
College freshmen live in and the dorm 
1 feew-^^: 



Jeff Williams 
1-1, Photography 
Shreveport 11 

"I am not too sure about all of 
their privileges but as far as their 
dorms go, I feel that we, the average 
students, should have the same com- 
forts." 



The Current Sauce is 
published weekly during the faH 
and spring semesters by the stu- 
dents of Northwestern State Uni- 
versity of Louisiana, it is not asso- 
ciated with any of the 
University's departments and is 
financed independently. 

The Current Sauce is 
based in the Office of Student 
Publications tocated in Kyser 
Hal The office of the editorial 
staff is 225H. telephone (318) 
357-5466 The adviser's office is 
103 Kyser Hail, teiephone 357- 
5253. 

The mailing address for 
the Current Sauce is P.O. Box 
5306, NSU. Natchitoches, LA 
71497. 

All correspondence, in- 
ciudirtg tetters to the editor is 
weiccme. Materia} submitted 
for consideration must be 
maiied to above address or 
brought to the office. 

The deadline for ait ad- 
vertising and copy is Friday by 3 
p.m Inclusion of any and all 
material is tefttothe discretion of 
the erfrtor. 

Letters to the editor 
should be typed (doucie- 
spaceti) signed, and should in- 
clude a Telephone numper 
where tne writer can be 
reached. No anonymous letters 
writ be printed. 

Current sauce subscrip- 
fiOn rates ore S ! ! per academic 
year (27 issues) or S6 per 
semester ( 1 4 issues). The paper is 
entered as second-class mail at 
Natchitoches. LA, The USPS 
number is 140-660 



PAGE 6 



CURRENT SAUCE 



OCTOBER 13, 1987 QCTC 



SPORTS 



Mistake-plagued Demons fall to 2-3 
after 13-3 loss to USL Ragin 1 Cajuns 



Passing the test 



By KIRK COPELAND 
Sports Editor 

Northwestern's . Demons 
dropped its third close game in three 
tries Saturday as Southwestern Lou- 
isiana stopped the Men in Purple, 13- 
3, despite Scott Stoker's season-high 
240 yards through the air and another 
impressive showing by the Demon 
defense. 

As in previous weeks, North- 
western beat themselves, losing three 
of eight fumbles (four total turnovers) 
and getting whistled for 44 yards on 
six penalties. 

The Fiery Ones showed signs 
of things to come on their first drive of 
the football game. NSU took the open- 
ing kick-off and drove down to the 
Cajun 25 yard line before Stoker threw 
an interception, only the third by 
Demon signal callers all year, to halt 
the penetration. As would happen 
throughout the game, however, the 
defense stood up and kept USL off the 
scoreboard. 

The Ragin' Cajuns opened the 
scoring in the second quarter after a 13 
play, 59 yard drive, which took 6:40 
off the clock. Patrick Broussard 
booted a 24 yard field goal to give 
Southwestern Louisiana a 3-0 lead. 

The Demons took the ensuing 
kick-off and again drove deep into 
Cajun territory before a Stoker 
fumble, that took a 25 yard roll back- 
wards, gave USL the ball. 

Again the Big D gave North- 
western an opportunity as they 
caused a fumble on the very next play. 
This time, Stoker and company came 
away with points on the scoreboard 
after a five play, 42 yard drive set up 
Keith Hodnett's 31 yard field goal to 
knot the game at three apiece. Unfor- 
tunately for the Demons it would be 
all the points the Ragin' Cajun defense 
would allow all game. 

USL took the lead late in the 
third quarter after NSU's Mark Con- 
treras got off a short punt that gave the 
Cajuns good field position at 
midfield. Southwestern Louisiana 
then drove to the Demon 25 where 
Broussard came on to boot a 42 yarder 
to give them the lead for good at 6-3. 

Again NSU took the ball into 
the USL end of the field before yet 



NSU golf returns 
after year absence 
of team program 

By CHRIS HUNT 

Staff Writer 

After having been cancelled 
for the 1986-87 season, 
Northwestern's golf program is back 
with a fresh team. The Demon golf- 
ers, however, have not been success- 
ful enough to draw the attention of the 
school. 

The golfers have competed in 
two tournaments so far this season, 
but they have not placed well. The 
first meet was held in Monroe at 
Chenault Golf Course, and the second 
tournament was held this past week- 
end at Stephen F. Austin State Univer- 
sity in Nacogdoches, Texas. The 
Demons, as expected after the year 
layoff, gained cellar-dweller finishes 
in both. 

Volunteer coach Terry Gandy 
is planning to turn things around for 
the Demon golf team. 

"We are going into our third 
meet looking at the first two as learn- 
ing experiences. Hopefully, we will 
be able to shake some nerves," Gandy 
said about the team's upcoming tour- 
nament against Sam Houston State in 
Huntsville, Texas. 

The team has no set practicing 
time, but the players come to the golf 
course and hit range balls in their 
spare time. In fact, most of their free 
time is spent at the recreation complex 
practicing. 

Being such an individual sport, 
golf basically allows no oppurtunity 
to play as a team, but the players on 
the Demon team are very close-knit 
and they get along great together. 

Gandy does not get paid for his 
duties as the golf coach. He is strictly 
a volunteer. He travels with the team, 
and, in fact, is the teams true coach. 
Because he is not on the payroll, his 
players have a very high opinion of 
him. 

The golfers are senior Jeff Pace, 
Keith Bolar, a transfer out of LSU- 
Shreveport, freshman Scott Kendrick, 
junior Ricky Trum, and Bom Ransi, a 
transfer out of LSU-Baton Rouge. 

With the first two meets be- 
hind them, the Demon golfers can 
look towards improvement, and with 
the help of Coach Gandy they can turn 
the once-defunct golf program into a 
winning tradition at Northwestern. 



another fumble by Stoker on the first 
play of the final stanza gave the ball 
away. The defense again took over as 
end John Kulakowski recovered a 
Cajun fumble (yes, they can do it, too) 
on the USL 48 yard line, giving the 
offense a chance to tie or take the lead . 
Three plays netted nine yards, and on 
fourth and one, Stoker was stopped at 
the line for no gain. That was the last 
time the Demons advanced into 
Cajun territory. 

Southwestern Louisiana 
scored the game's only touchdown 
and iced the game midway through 
the fourth quarter after a Leslie 
Luquette punt rolled to a stop on the 
Demons' four yard line. On third 
down, Stoker got hit behind the line 
and fumbled, the ball finally being 
corraled by Cajun Stanley Hall in the 
end zone. Broussard added the point 
after to seal the Demons' fate. 

"USL was very good defen- 
sively," said Demon head honcho 
Sam Goodwin. "We didn't play very 
well offensively. In the second quarter 
we moved the ball pretty good . . . but 
either turned it over or called the 
wrong play at the wrong time." 

John Stephens, the Demons' 
preseason All-America tailback, did 
not dress for the game and is question- 
able for this week's conference battle 
against Southwest Texas State. 

"He maybe would have made 
a difference," Goodwin said. "As far 
as his injury, if he doesn't do anything 
the first part of this week, we'll have 
him scoped (orthoscopy). Kenneth 
DeWitt is a winner and a great back." 

Southwest Texas is off to an 0- 
5 start but has improved in it's last two 
games, both against Division 1-A 
schools, and Goodwin says that the 
Bobcats are going to be a tough team 
to beat. 

"They usually start off slowly 
and begin to get it together by the 
middle of the season," the Top Demon 
said. "Usually when they do, we're 
there and that's why they've come out 
on top. . . They'd be tough to beat if 
they were 5-0. They'll probably be 
tougher now that they're looking for 
that first victory." 

Bobcat Stadium will be the site 
of this week's matchup with the kick- 
off coming at 2:00 p.m. Saturday. 




NSU quarterback Scott Stoker falls back into his pass protection 
in last Saturday's 13-3 defeat at the hands of Southwestern 
Louisiana's Ragin Cajuns in Lafayette. Stoker had the hot hand 
against the Cajuns, completing 21 of 37 passes. Stoker's 240 
yards of aerial assault were the most this year by a Demon 
field general, surpassing Rusty Slack's 238 yards against Mc- 
Neese State. 



Volleyballers, cross country slated 
for home action in upcoming week 



After nearly a week off, the 
Lady Demon volleyball squad ought 
to be ready for action when it travels 
to Grambling tomorrow evening for a 
match with the Lady Tigers. 

"We've had a good week of 
rest and relaxation, though the girls 
are ready to get back to game action," 
head coach Rickey McCalister said 
duringabreakin workouts yesterday. 

A nnie Bloxson leads theSouth- 
land Conference in rutting percentage 
witha .391 mark and juniorSonja Dale 
is the top Lady Demon when it comes 
to blocking with her 1,17 average. 
Dawn Carlos tops theSLC is aces (.64) 
while the entire Lady Demon squad 
ranks first in blocks with a 3.54 
average. 

NSU gets Southland Confer- 
ence competition underway Saturday 
when Northeast Louisiana pays 
Prather Colisium a visit. Tip-off is set 
for 7:00 in that contest. 



Five teams, along with North- 
western State's very own Demon and 
Lady Demon contingents, descend on 
the NSU campus this Friday for the 
Northwestern State Invitational cross 
country meet. 

Besides NSU, look for Nicholls 
State, McNeese State, Southwestern 
Louisiana, Louisiana College, and 
Lamar students to be running around 
campus beginning with the womenat 
4 p.m. 

Both NSU squads are coming 
off their finest outing of the season at 
last week's McNeese State Invita- 
tional. The NSU men took home a fifth 
place finish, a point behind USL and 
nine points away from third place 
McNeese State. The Lady Demons 
countered with a fourth place finish in 
their seven team field. 

Leading the way for the 
Demons is Ronald Wilkins while 
Vicki Robarge holds top spot for the 
Lady Demons. 




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3, 1987 



OCTOBER 13, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 7 



NEWS 



are coming 
he season at 
>tate Invita- 
: home a fifth 
nd USL and 

third place 
dy Demons 
ilace finish in 

yay for the 
ilkins while 
spot for the 



Water 

from page one 

the students want it corrected imme- 
diately, but they have got to under- 
stand that this is a big plant. It's not 
like at your house where you turn a 
switch on and off," Boutte said. 

Boutte said they are trying to get 
the hot water problems corrected be- 
fore winter. He said the power plant 
has been working closely with the 
Housing Department on the water 
situation. Boutte said he hopes the 
new system at the power plant will be 
operational soon and that by Thanks- 
giving the water and steam system 
should be back to normal. 

Another major problem facing 
dorm life is the building heating and 
cooling system. For a couple of days 
the air conditioner was turned off in 
Rapides. According to Tyree the air 
was turned off because of the cooler 
temperatures at night. Tyree said he 
assumed open windows would cool 
the dorm enough. 

Toilet paper, or a lack of, has 
also created havoc in the dorms. 
Sabine has faced both shortages and 



outages since the beginning of the 
semester. 

According to Andrea Madison, third 
floor south resident assistant (R.A.) in 
Sabine, the toilet paper situation this 
year compared to last year's is worse. 

"It seems like they're not getting 
enough (toilet paper)," Madison said. 
To the 24 rooms on her hall, Madison 
distributes 24 rolls of toilet paper 
which is expected to last until the next 
shipment of paper arrives. 

Due to the small amount of 
paper available, Madison collects 
what she considers a fair share of toilet 
paper for her hall. However, Madison 
said she has seen other R.A.'s pick up 
more than their fair share of paper. 
When some take more than their 
share, others do not have enough for 
their halls, Madison said. 

Several girls in Sabine have 
purchased an "emergency" four-pack 
of toilet paper for their rooms. Boutte 
said this action should not be neces- 
sary. The Housing Department or 
house director should be notified 
when toilet paper is running low or is 
gone, Boutte said. 

Boutte said the new cleaning service, 
which is under contract with the uni- 
versity, should monitor the amount of 



Student requests black involvement 



Dear Editor, 

As long as I have attended 
Northwestern I have always wit- 
nessed a lack of black NSU students 
voting with the exception of voting for 
the 1986 Homecoming Court. There 
were five black NSU students out of 
nine on that court, yet this year we 
barely had one black on the Home- 
coming Court. Why? 

Because black NSU students do not 
take the time to walk into the Student 
Union lobby, sign a sheet and pull 
down a few voting machine levers. To 
the black NSU students that do vote, I 
give you a pat on the back. Every 
black student on this campus should 
take the initiative to express his/her 
opinion each time NSU has an elec- 
tion. 

We all have opinions and we all 
should express them. I constantly 
hear my fellow colleagues complain 
about the results of some of the elec- 



tions yet when asked if they voted I 
usually seem to get a negative reply. 

Maybe we are not realizing how 
important it is to vote. If you are not 
satisfied with something, you find 
some way to change it. Changing the 
outcome of the elections is very 
simple: go vote! 

One purpose of Jesse Jackson's 
campaign was simply to show the 
American people how powerful and 
important black votes can be when we 
all pull together and vote. During his 
campaign, black people flocked to the 
polls in extremely large numbers. 

If Jesse Jackson sets an example in 
showing how important black votes 
are, then I say to all of my fellow black 
colleagues, "Let's stop complaining 
and start voting. We all know that 
actions speak louder than words. 

Angela LaCour 
a very concerned black student 



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toilet paper being used. Boutte said 
the problem concerning toilet paper is 
due to a lack of communication within 
the housing system. 

Although returning upperclass- 
men have complained of the job being 
done by the cleaning service, Boutte 
would make no comment. Boutte said 
that unlike last year when the same 
custodian staff cleaned the same 
dorms each day, different people may 
clean the same dorm each time. 

St. Andre said if a problem 
should occur in the dorms, residents 
should first notify the R.A. If the prob- 
lem is not corrected, the student 
should then notify the house director. 
If the problem still exists, Boutte 
should be contacted and made aware 
of the problem. 

St. Andre said Boutte normally 
refers the problem to him, but St. 
Andre believes Boutte should also 
know about the problems. St. Andre 
said, "If I'm not notified, I can't do 
anything." 

St. Andre said a log is kept on 
problems reported by R.A.'s and 
house directors turning in mainte- 
nance slips to the Housing Depart- 
ment. According to priority, prob- 
lems are then reported to the Mainte- 
nance Department for repairs. 

Construction 
from page four 

in the grass where they walked be- 
tween buildings. We saw where they 
needed a sidewalk and put one in," 
Lindsey said. 

The next major project is the 
renovation of Vamado Hall. Plans for 
the reconstruction were sent to Baton 
Rouge for review Oct. 9. Once the 
plans return, Northwestern will begin 
taking bids for contractors and start 
construction. The projected finish 
date for Vamado Hall is the fall of 
1988. 

Northwestern's Maintenance 
Department has a large staff this year 
and employs a diverse group of work- 
ers such as carpenters, plumbers, elec- 
tricians, upholsterers, Post Office 
workers, groundsmen and many 
more, Lindsey said. 

"As a general rule, our mainte- 
nance crew is a large part of the con- 
struction going on around campus. 
For example, all furniture placed in 
the dorms was redone by in-house 
people," Lindsey said. "We try to do 
as much work with our crew as pos- 
sible although a lot of the construction 
has to be handled through different 
companies." 



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Because we now 
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Write us for our 
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ON OCTOBER 20, "REPRESENTATIVE AVAILABLE 
Meet with your Jostens representative for full details. See our complete ring selection 
on display in your college bookstore. 



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Tired of the Old Look? 
Then come to the team with top 
training for the latest fashion 
for men and women 

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Located right here in the NSU Student 
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Come meet the crew: 
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PAGE 8 



CURRENT SAUCE 



OCTOBER 13, 1987 



CAMPUS LINE 



Nursing majors 

The Departmental Reading and 
Arithmetic tests will be given Thurs- 
day, Oct. 22 in room 308 of Kyser Hall. 
The Reading Test will begin at 4 p.m. 
The Arithmetic Test will begin at 5 
p.m. 

Students must have completed 
all English, reading and math devel- 
opmental courses to be eligible to take 
exams. 

Students are required to bring 
two ID'S to gain entry into the exams. 

Purple Jackets 

The Purple Jacket's "Night on 
the Town" fundraiser begins Thurs- 
day. Raffle tickets are $1 each with the 
winner receiving a $50 dinner for two 
at Mariner's, two passes to the movie 
of your choice at Parkway Cinema, 
two passes to the Student Body and 
more. 

Purple Jacket pictures will be 
taken at 6:20 p.m. Wednesday on 
Chaplin's Lake. Members are asked to 
dress accordingly. 

A meeting will be held 11 a.m. 
Thursday. Members can pick up raffle 
tickets at the meeting. 

Personal checks cashed 

' Personal checks can be cashed 
for students at the cashier's office lo- 
cated in Roy Hall. A $25 limit has been 
set. Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. 

Darlene Rachal, manager of the 
University Bookstore, said she in- 
tends to restore check cashing at the 
book store by Oct. 16. 

KNWD prizes 

The following people won 
prizes from KNWD's "Stairway to 
Heaven '87" marathon. To claim 
prizes, winners need to take their 
NSU IDs and go to KNWD located in 
Russell Hall. Prizes can be picked up 
from 2 to 5 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday. If unable to claim prizes 
during these hours, winners should 
call the station at 357-5693 for alterna- 
tive arrangements. The deadline to 
claim prizes is Oct. 21 . 

Winners are: Jerome Cox, Mar- 
lene Jennings, Ranie Blanchard, 
Robert Jones, Jason Best, Mary Atkins, 
Angela Mequet, Pearlie Williams, 
Hope Lacaze, Monica Grappe, 
Amanda Posen, Michele Buzbee, 
Michael Yakousk, Robert Noah, Wil- 
lie Hey, Johnny Hayes, Joseph Wein- 
ninson, Randy Vickers and John Bon- 
nette. 

PRSSA 

Membership dues will be col- 
lected at the next Public Relations 
Student Society of America meeting 
which is to be held 10:45 a.m. Thurs- 
day in room 106 of Kyser. 

Organization registration 

All campus organizations need 
to renew their organization cards 
' through the Student Activities Office. 
Submit all cards and any newly re- 
vised organization constitutions to 
room 214 of the Student Union. 



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FANTASTIC BUSINESS EXPERIENCE 

FOR YOUR RESUME! 
Meet people and gain recognition on 
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Representative. 
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and ask for Entertainment Tours. 



HELP WANTED 



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Scholars' College applica- 
tions 

Northwestern is accepting ap- 
plications for admission to the Louisi- 
ana Scholars' College for the 1988 
spring semester. Deadline for apply- 
ing is Dec. 1. 

Currently enrolled high school 
seniors and college undergraduate 
students who wish to be considered 
for admission in the spring should 
write the Louisiana Scholars' College, 
Room 239, Kyser Hall, Northwestern 
State University, Natchitoches, LA, 
71497. 

Purple Jackets 

The Purple Jackets are sponsor- 
ing a raffle for "A Night on the Town" 
as a fundraiser. The raffle will include 
items necessary to make a perfect 
date, including dinner at the 
Mariner's. See a Purple Jacket for 
more information. 

The next Purple Jacket meeting 
will be 11 a.m. Thursday. A speaker 
has been scheduled to appear. Ex- 
cuses for absences are to be turned in 
to Monte Johnson. 

Sigma Kappa 

Sigma Kappa Soroity's annual 
Dream Man party has been planned 
for Oct. 13. The male with the most 
invitations will be crowned Sigma 
Kappa's Dream Man. Only a few 
chosen men will be invited to the 
party. 

Paul Hardy 

Paul Hardy, candidate for lieuten- 
ant governor, will speak Oct. 15at3:30 
p.m. in room 321 in the Student 
Union. The College Republicans are 
sponsoring the candidate's appear- 
ance. 



Leisure-time courses 

Leisure-time courses in public 
speaking, writing personal memoirs 
and candy making begin the week of 
Oct. 11-17 under the sponsorship of 
North western's Division of Continu- 
ing Education and Community Serv- 
ices. 

The public speaking course 
begins Tuesday, Oct. 13 and continues 
through Dec. 8 in Room 113 of the 
Physical Education Majors' Building. 
Sessions are scheduled from 6:30 to 
8:30 p.m. Registration fee for nine 
sessions is S45 per person. 

"Writing My Memoirs" is a 
four-session course that will meet 
from 7 to 9 p.m Thursdays Oct. 15 
through Nov. 5, in the Cammie G. 
Henry Library Research Center. Reg- 
istration is $15 per person. 

The candy making course will 
be conducted Saturday, Oct. 17 from 
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. in room 123 of the 
Physical Education Majors' Building. 
Registration is SI and includes recipe 
booklet, instruction booklet and 
.candy mold. 

To register for the public speak- 
ing, memoirs or candy making 
courses, call the Division of Continu- 
ing Education and Community Serv- 
ices at 357-5126. 



Iberville 

Campus groups and clubs 
wishing to obtain wallspace in Iber- 
ville Dining Hall for use should con- 
tact James Taylor, director of board 
operations, at 357-6451. Taylor said 
wall space will be issued on a first- 
come first-serve basis. Wall space will 
be assigned to specific groups to use 
as they please for posting notices, 
hanging group pictures or crests. 



Korea 



a dollar. Even when in the military 
they continue their studies if able. 
They learn to speak English early in 
their education and many have hopes 
of continuing their studies in Amer- 
ica. While the Korean student is burn- 
ing the midnight oil learning his field 
of study, the American youth is stay- 
ing up late at night doing everything 
but studying. 

It's not an easy life for Korean 
college students. During their two 
year stay in the military they make S5 
a month — not a lot to party on. 

Korean society has changed 
drastically over the years. It has 
grown independent in some ways 
and dependent in others. Korea 
manufactures countless goods that 
are sold in America. If you don't be- 
lieve me just read the label on many of 
your shoes. The Koreans depend 
heavily on the American dollar to 
support their growing economy. 
When I left Korea, one American 
dollar was worth 812 Korean won. 

South Korea has been called the 
best kept military secret. It is a won- 
derful place to visit and to see old 
world customs still being practiced. 
However, the closer you get to the 
north the more realistic everything 
becomes. The tension between North 
Korea and South Korea still exists and 
can be felt from Seoul northward. 
Military members stationed in those 
areas live with the tension every day 
and are quick to tell you that they live 
a real life mission. 

With the presence of military 
threat so close at hand and the recent 
anti-government college riots, Korea 
should be called anything but the 
Land of the Morning Calm. 



Inside Watson Library 



The Cammie G. Henry research center 



77n's article is the fifth in a 
series on Watson Library. 

The Cammie G . Henry Research 
Center is a place on Northwestem's' 
campus where history is alive, excit- 
ing and waiting to be savored by stu- 
dents and researchers. 

Located on the third floor of 
Watson Library, the center houses 
over 600 diferent collections of letters, 
papers, documents, photographs and 
other items from the past which tell 
about life in every period of Natchito- 
ches history. Bits of lore can be found 
about medicine, farming, forestry, 
war and politics. Also, manuscripts 
from the hands of such diverse people 
as writer Lyle Saxon, Governor Ber- 
nardo Galvez and mathematician 
Car! Fricdrich Gauss can be found 



Northwestern is much indebted 
to the people of Natchitoches who 
have given their original family pa- 
pers to the library to create this center 
of scholarly activity. Janet Kyser's gift 
makes it possible for students to expe- 
rience the early days of school integra- 
tion. Frances Bonnette donated hun- 
dreds of bills of lading telling about 
steamboat traffic on the Red River. 

Last year nearly 5,000 requests 
for archival material were handled by 
the staff of the research center. Faculty 
and writers from over the world have 
come to Northwestern to use its re- 
sources on Clementine Hunter, Caro- 
line Dormon, Kate Chopin and news 
views of the history of Louisiana. 

The Cam mie G . Henry Research 
Center is open weekdays from 8 a.m. 
until 5 p.m. 



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laff Writer 

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enter 



CTOBER 20 1987 



VOL. n NO. 12 



CURR 




NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY OF LOUISiANA 



NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 71497 



State Fair Week highlighted by activities and game 



y MICHELLE WEEGO 
faff Writer 

Welcome, Northwestern, to 
ke final conflict 

Although this year's State Fair 
jame will be the last against Louisi- 
ana Tech, the Student Government 
Association (SGA) and Student Ac- 
ivities Board (SAB) have put together 
jweek of special events to prepare for 
he best Demon-Bulldog contest ever. 

Starting off the week, an artist 
|ras in the Student Union lobby Mon- 
lay drawing caricatures of students. 
\ volleyball game between the SAB 
Jnd SGA was also part of Monday's 
yents. 

Tuesday's activities include a 
jecial movie and a scavenger hunt. 



The movie is Stephen King's "The 
Dead Zone" and will be shown at 7 
p.m. on the big screen TV in Union 
Station. For those interested in a little 
fun— along with a S50 prize — a scav- 
enger hunt will begin Tuesday morn- 
ing. Hunters will be able to pick up the 
scavenge list at 8 a.m. in room 214 in 
the Student Union. 

Wednesday's events include 
an SGA football game at Louisiana 
Tech. SGA members from both 
schools will face off at 5:30 p.m. for 
their traditional State Fair rivalry. The 
State Fair court will attend the SGA 
football match at Ruston and other 
students are invited to attend. 

"We encourage the students to 
lend their support in this event," 



Sheila Delozia, SGA State Fair chair- 
woman, said of the match. Departure 
time for Ruston is 3:30 p.m. in the 
Student Union parking lot. 

Also slated for Wednesday's 
events is SAB's concert featuring the 
band "1 964" as the Beatles. Set for 7:30 
p.m. in A.A. Fredericks' Fine Arts 
Auditorium, "1964" is a replica of the 
Beatles in both music and appearance. 
Northwestern students are admitted 
free to the concert with student ID. 

The campus State Fair parade 
is slated for 7 p.m. Thursday. The 
parade will begin behind the Student 
Union and end at Iberville Dining 
Hall. All participants in the parade 
must be behind the Student Union at 
6:30 p.m. Immediately following the 



parade, a pep rally, presentation of 
the State Fair Court and the burning of 
the Bulldog will take place. 

The SAB will also sponser its 
annual "find the bulldog" contest. A 
stuffed bulldog will be hidden some- 
where on campus and a S50 prize 
awarded to the finder. Clues to the 
whereabouts of the stuffed bulldog 
will be announced at SAB State Fair 
activities and will be available from 
room 214 in the Student Union on 
Thursday if needed. 

The Rally in the Alley in Shre- 
veport will take place at noon Satur- 
day. Pregame presentation of both 
Northwestern and Louisiana Tech 
courts will be 6:30 p.m. in Independ- 
ence Stadium, Shreveport. The final 




Members of the 1987 State 
Fair Court attended a reception 
in their honor at the Alumni 
Center Thursday. Pictured, from 
left, are Darcy LeBianc, Rachel 
Heider, State Fair Queen Tracy 
Lee, Shwu-Fen Lee, Kirsten 
Gemhauser, Nan Goss, Sonya 
Rigaud and Melody Smith. 
Yvette Jordan was unable to 
attend the reception. The girls 
will be presented during State 
Fair pre-game ceremonies Satur- 
day in Shreveport. 



NSU biology students head south to study 



V LISA DARDEN 
lanaglng Editor 

While some students may have 
pent the weekend studying in their 
brm rooms, one group of students 
id their studying outside. 

Students in invertebrate zool- 
fey and wildlife management trav- 
fed to Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge for 
le weekend to gather and identify 
Srious marine organisms and shells. 



For some students the trip was 
Iso their first encounter with south 
puisiana and the native alligator. 

Beth Leeder, a junior secon- 
fery education major from Fort Polk, 
tod the trip was her first trip down 
puth. "It was the first time I've seen a 
we alligator in its natural habitat," 
eeder said. "It's a lot different down 
fere and Rockefeller is a really nice 
fclity." 

Located in Cameron and Ver- 
sion parishes, Rockefeller Wildlife 
fefuge is an 84,000 acre marsh refuge 
perated by the Louisiana Depart- 



ment of Wildlife and Fisheries. Bor- 
dering the Gulf of Mexico, the Refuge 
is home to alligators, Canadian geese, 
swamp rabbits, ducks, deer, a variety 
of wading birds, muskrat, raccoon 
and mink. The Refuge is also a resting 
stop for many birds which winter in 
Central and South America. 

Dr. Dwayne Kruse, professor 
of biology, was this year's sponsor of 
the trip. Kruse, who teaches inverte- 
brate zoology, said the biology de- 
partment makes a trip to Rockefeller 
each fall and spring and have been 
going to the Refuge for 10 years. 

"A course of invertebrate zool- 
ogy is not complete without marine 
invertebrates. We come here to look at 
the marine animals," Kruse said. 

Judee Martin, freshman gen- 
eral studies major from Monroe, said 
the trip had been both fun and educa- 
tional. 

"I couldn't begin to tell you 
what I've learned here this weekend. 
I've never seen a live anemone before 
and I've seen lots of shells before but 



not these," Martin said. Martin plans 
on going into marine biology. 

Driving to the Refuge on Fri- 
day, the group's real work began Sat- 
urday. The day began with a talk from 
Larry McNease, biologist for the 
Department of Wildlife and Fisheries- 
Fur and Refuge Division. The group 
discussed such topics as marsh ero- 
sion, types of wildlife and the devel- 
opment and the purpose of the Ref- 
uge. Much of the talk was devoted to 
alligators and their lifestyle. 

Following the discussion, the 
group of students went to Rutherford 
Beach to seine for marine life and to 
gather shells. While at the beach, stu- 
dents collected jellyfish, blue crabs, 
ghost crabs, fiddler crabs and plank- 
ton samples. 

The group then moved to the 
Cameron jetties leading into the Gulf 
and spent the afternoon seining and 
searching the rocks for various ma- 
rine life. At the jetties the class col- 
lected such items as salt water hydra, 
ship worms, zebra snails and green 



anemones. Anemones, which have 
tenacles, are primitive invertebrates 
which when open resemble flowers. 

Returning to the Refuge lodge, 
the students set up a mini-lab to get a 
closer look at their samples through 
dissecting scopes. The classes identi- 
fied such things as blue crab larvae in 
the megalops stage, baby shrimp, salt 
water hydra in the polyp stage and 
various other crustaceans. 

Lori McNease, sophomore 
zoology major from Gra id Chenier, 
said that even though shs nas lived on 
the Refuge all her life she learned 
something new. McNease, whose fa- 
ther works at Rockefeller, said the trip 
to the Cameron jetties was her first 
close look there. "I've never been to 
collect on the jetties in Cameron be- 
fore." 

In addition to collecting 
samples, the students also enjoyed 
some wildlife food including alliga- 
tor, teal and venison. 

Other professors on the trip 
were Dr. Walter Holmes, professor of 
biology for Scholars' College, and Dr. 
Arthur Allen, professor of biology. 



Program offers international studies abroad 



V MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
faff Writer 

Three Northwestern students 
learning abroad this semester 
-ough the International Student 
Jchange Program (ISEP). The stu- 
wits, who are now residing in Aus- 
felia, Canada and Scotland, are re- 
aving college credit at Northwest- 
fn while tasting the ways of the 
forld abroad. 

Brian Atkinson, a junior public 
ations major from Morgan City, is 
ending Laurentian University in 
idbury, Ontario, Canada, for a year. 

"He's having fun," were the 
st words of Bonnie Atkinson, 
Brian's mother. However, Brian has 
yt mentioned much about his 
Wsses, his mother said. Atkinson's 
brents are John and Bonnie Atkinson 
Morgan City. 

It has just begun to snow in 
Canada. According to Atkinson's 
'other, the only snow Brian has ever 
fen was that which has fallen in 
Natchitoches since his arrival at 
Northwestern. 

Thanksgiving was recently 
^lebrated in Canada. According to 
'k mother, Brian was invited to eat 
[Hanksgiving dinner with a Caria- 
]>an family- Traditionally, a Cana- 
dian Thanksgiving dinner is served 
Knout utensils. 

Atkinson is staying in a dormi- 
*ty suite on the Laurentian campus. 



The suite has four bedrooms and a 
central living and kitchen area. Ac- 
cording to Atkinson's mother, Brian 
has had a few problems with room- 
mates. At one point a girl moved in to 
the suite, but she quickly moved out. 
Also, someone who spoke no English 
tried to move into Atkinson's room by 
accident. Atkinson could not speak 
enough French to make the person 
understand the mistake. 

Atkinson is taking English, 
French, international marketing and 
an entrepreneurship class. His classes 
are taught in both French and English. 
Atkinson is also working with the 
campus newspaper at Laurentian. 

At Laurentian, classes are held 
all year long instead of on a semster 
basis according to Atkinson's mother. 
Also, 80 percent constitutes an "A" in 
Canada. Atkinson's mother said she 
warned Brian to beware of things that 
seem too easy. 

Todd Keenan, a junior his- 
tory/business major, is attending the 
University of Strathclyde for a year. It 
took Keenan about 24 hours to reach 
Strathclyde, located in Glasgow, Scot- 
land, United Kingdom, by plane. 

Acccording to Keenan's 
mother, Alice Keenan, she has heard 
from Todd only once. She said last 
week was his first week to attend 
class. 

According to Keenan's 
mother, Todd said no grades are 



given. Keenan is taking political sci- 
ence, history and foreign language 
classes at Strathclyde. The classes are 
yearly and one pass/fail exam is 
given at the end of the year. 

Keenan told his mother that 14 
Americans are attending the univer- 
sity. Keenan is staying in a suite with 
two students of Arabic descent. 

Keenan is also having to adjust 
to the food. According to Keenan's 
mother, Todd is not used to eating 
lamb, which the Scottish eat a lot of. 
When she talked with Todd, he was 
going out to find some American 
burgers. Keenan's father is Dr. Char- 
les Keenan of the History, Social Sci- 
ence and Social Work department at 
Northwestern. 

Jenny Burkhead, a senior Eng- 
lish literature major, is attending Flin- 
ders University of South Australia for 
the semester. According to Dr. Marie 
Burkhead, professor of management 
in the Business Administration De- 
partment at Northwestern, it took 
Jenny about 36 hours of traveling to 
reach Flinders. 

According to her mother, 
Burkhead was exhausted after the 
trip. Burkhead said Jenny was tired 
and felt dehydrated. According to 
Burkhead's mother, the flight crew 
gave the travelers orange juice every 
two hours, but it didn't help much. 

Burkhead's mother said Jenny 
will stop in Hawaii during the return 



trip to help relieve some of the dis- 
comfort of the flight. Burkhead will 
spend two days in Honolulu on the 
return trip. 

According to Burkhead's 
mother, Jenny has found Australians 
very fond of American clothes, books 
and other typical American 
possesions. She also found that prod- 
ucts, especially American products, 
are very expensive in Australia. Dr. 
Burkhead gave the example of a pa- 
perback book that would cost around 
S4 in America. Dr. Burkhead esti- 
mated that the same paperback 
would cost around S10 in Australia. 

Burkhead's mother said her 
main class is a North American litera- 
ture course which counts for about 
half of the course load. She also said 
three different term systems are used 
at Flinders. The systems are a whole 
year, semester and quarter system 
and different classes are on different 
systems. 

Burkhead's mother said Jenny 
found no feedback or tests in any of 
her classes. Students took the month 
of August off to do papers for their 
classes. For most classes at least a 
3,000 word paper had to be written. 

According to Dr. Burkhead, 
Jenny found coed dorm living an 

See ISEP 
Page 5 



conflict of Northwestern vs. Tech will 
begin at 7 p.m. 

Sonya Riguad, SAB's special 
events chairwoman, urges everyone 
to join in on the fun. 

"I hope that everyone partici- 
pates in all these activities. We need to 
show our spirit. ThisState Fair game is 
really important because this will be 
our last year playing against Tech." 

In addition to planning State 
Fair activities, Riguad is in charge of 
coordinating events for Homecoming 
week and Spring Fling. 

Members of the State Fair 
Court will be very busy this week, 
according to Delozia. Delozia, along 
with Laura Willis, State Fair co-chair- 
woman, is in charge of all court activi- 



ties. 

Court members are asked to 
attend all State Fair week activities. 
Oct. 15, the court attended a tea at the 
Alumni House hosted by Karen 
Engeron and Liz Bonnctte. Each 
member of the court was presented a 
State Fair sweatshirt. 

On Monday, the court traveled 
to Shreveport to meet mayor John 
Hussey along with Tech's court. SGA 
Vice President Dave DeCuir and De- 
lozia also attended. 

Saturday morning, the court 

See State Fair 
Page 5 



Final conflict slated 



By DAN MEDLIN 
Staff Writer 

Northwestern has had a foot- 
ball team since 1909. In those years 
NSU was LSNC or Louisiana State 
Normal College and most often 
fielded a team no more than 16-mem- 
bers strong. 

The first State Fair Classic be- 
tween then LSNC and the then Ruston 
College was played in 1911. The few 
men that Normal College had were 
fielded against a "more experienced" 
Ruston team. 

These were the days when 
having shoulder pads meant having a 
thick sweater and when helmets 
hadn't been thought of yet. The Pot- 
pourri reported men playing three 
quarters with a broken arm and others 
playing a whole game on a sprained 
ankle. 

Interesting to note is that in 
19T1 the Normal boys also played 
teams from LSU and Tulane. Al- 
though no scores are available, it's 
been said that we gave both teams a 
good showing. The 1911 team fielded 
16 members with an average weight 
of 139 pounds. The biggest player 
weighed a whopping 174 pounds and 
the smallest an incredible 113 pounds. 
The 1912 Potpourri reported the team 
as "the lightest team that ever repre- 
sented the institution." 

In the 1912 season, the State 
Normal College dropped their bone 
crushinggames with LSU,Tulancand 
Ruston. The Normal boys ended with 
an undefeated season. From 1912 to 
1942 the State Fair Classic continued, 
sometimes fielding Normal versus 
Ruston and sometimes not. 
In 1930, after a 0-0 tie with the new 
Louisiana Tech, the Normal boys 
decided to play a more formidable 
team for the State Fair Classic. That 



year we played the Arkansas Aggies. 
Soon after gaining the inspiring 
Demon mascot, the gridiron gang- 
sters of the new Northwestern State 
College had a memorable winning 
streak against the Bulldogs defeating 
the whimpering puppies in 1 938, 1 939 
and 1940. 

The Demons had no intercolle- 
giate athletics in 1943duetoa national 
emergency called in 1942 concerning 
World War II. However, in 1944 NSC 
played Tech twice, once in Natchito- 
ches, losing 21-7, and once in Ruston, 
stalemating at 0-0. In 1945, NSC 
played the Bulldogs for homecoming 
and took another loss of 7-2. In 1946 
WWII vets returned and so did a tra- 
dition still standing at Northwestern. 

In 1946 the game was renewed 
as the State Fair Classic between 
Northwestern and Tech. As the 1947 
Potpourri stated, "the game was pre- 
ceded with all the gala 'rivalry of the 
old days, guarding the campus, cap- 
turing Tech invaders, the special train 
to Shreveport, pep meetings, etc." 

Past Dean of Students Dudley 
Fulton recalled some fond memories 
of the State Fair Classic proceedings 
including the train which picked up 
students and faculty in front of the 
gates of Northwestern and took them 
to Shreveport for an afternoon game. 

"We would go to the fair after 
the game, then to the hotels for more 
pep rallies and then we would ride the 
train back," Fulton said. 

Local Shreveport bar owners 
in the downtown square area near the 
Texas Street Bridge reported the be- 
gining of the traditional "Rally in the 
Alley" to be somewhere in the late 

See Tradition 
Page 5 




Demon hug 

Vic the Demon hugs a mini-Demon during Northwestern's 
game against Southwest Texas State Univeristy in San Marcos 
last Saturday. 



Page 



October 20, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Page % 



NEWS 



Mr. and Miss NSU run-offs 

vote for one in each category 





John Kulakowski 



Steve Horton 




Hardy reveals plans 



Marsha McLamore 




Rachel Heider 



By CHRISTI RHYMES 
Staff Writer 

Lt. Gov. candidate Paul Hardy 
made his campaign to more than 45 
Northwestern students attending his 
presentation last Thursday in the Stu- 
dent Union. 

Hardy, who switched from the 
Democratic to the Republican Party a 
year ago, served as state senator of 
Iberia and St. Martin parishes in 1971, 
as secretary of state inl976, and as 
secretary of the State Department of 
Transportation and Development 
from 1980-84. 

Hardy empasized the theme of 
his campaign to be "a rebirth of pride 
in Louisiana." 

"I want to help redirect the 
state of Louisiana. When we leave the 
state I want us to be proud to say we're 
from Louisiana," the candidate said. 

Hardy said his number one 
objective as lieutenant governor will 
be to sell Louisiana's work force. 

"I believe that our people have 
the desire, the tenacity, the dedica- 
tion, the determination and the ability 
to prove that our efficency and profi- 
ciency as working people are second 
to none . . . including the Japanese," 
Hardy said. 

In order to move into the 
number one seat of sales, Hardy said 
he will sponsor legislation to consoli- 
date the offices of the lieutenant gov- 
ernor, secretary of state and commis- 
sioner of insurance, and also the de- 
partments of Commerce and Culture 
with Recreation and Tourism. As of 
now, the main duties of lieutenant 
governor are restricted to the office of 
Recreation and Tourism. 

According to Hardy, the same 
type of legislation is in operation in 
four other states and will save Louisi- 
ana $1 million. 

If elected, Hardy promised to 
first clean up the state. He also wants 
to change the operation of state parks 
which he claims are open only during 
election season. 

"We should have an election 
every six months so that the parks will 
stay open," Hardy said of current 
park operation. 

Hardy said he will recommend 
that the state consider offering state 



parks on bid to be run by private 
groups or tum them over to local 
governing authorities or non-profit 
organizations. Hardy said he proved 
the technique works when Sammy 
Gill State Park at Toledo Bend was 
leased to private managment. Hardy 
was serving as secretary of the De- 
partment of Transportation and De- 
velopment during the transaction. 

According to Hardy, Sammy 
Gill Park was costing the state 543,000 
annually to operate. The Department, 
however, advertised for bids and 
leased the park for 515,500 per year 
and required that 5200,000 in im- 
provements be made over a 10-year 
period. 

Hardy also mentioned the 
movie industry as a possible option to 
generate tourism interests in Louisi- 
ana. Hardy was an associate producer 
and actor in a 1986 film "Belizaire the 
Cajun" made in Louisiana. The candi- 
date plans to be instrumental in con- 
vincing filmmakers that Louisiana is 
an ideal setting for many movies. 

Hardy voiced his concern of 
making improvements in Louisiana. 

"I want to be a part of the 
change we are going to see in Louisi- 
ana. If we're not going to have a 
change, I hope I'm not elected," 
Hardy said. 

Republican candidate Hardy 
was invited to Northwestern by the 
College Republicans. 





Flag football winds down 



By MICHI 
Staff Writ* 



By BERTHA MAXIE 
Staff Writer 

Northwestern's intramural 
flag football tournament is drawing tc 
an end this week. League champion- 
ships will be played Friday, the day ol 
decision, to discover who is the king 
of the hill or queen as the case may be 

Monday marked the begin- 
ning of the the fourth and final week 
of intramural flag football. A glance at 
the record books shows that in most 
cases the race for the superbowl, or ir 
this case the T-shirts, is still up in the 
air. Results of games played this week 
will set the stage for Friday's finals. 

In the Greek league, Alpha Ph: 
Alpha leads the pack with a record ol 
6-0. Friday the Alpha men will square 
off against either the men of 
Tau Kappa Epsilon whose record 
currently stands at 2-1 or those ol 
Kappa Alpha whose present record i; 
3-1. 

In the women's league, Ur 
Kappa Fifth leads with a record of 5-0 
They will face one of three competi- 
tors currently in a three-way tie for a 
spot in the finals. The close race is 



De 

ing in the 
There's a] 



games will decide who plays in if 
championships on Friday. 

In the men's open league «. ma t 
other three-way toss up exists. TVief m ons. An 
is between the men of Kappa Alphaj. Gruber is 
who stand at 5-1, the East All St». Q n 
also with a record of 5-1, and t$ crus hees 1 
Untouchables with a record of 4-lj : ve po rt i nt 

The dorm league stands vvf hasintrod 
Bossier Hall holding at 3-0 and | _<alled 
Nature Boys at 2-1. As before, the' Shrevepo 
teams have games during the wet tackle the 
which might alter Friday's lineup. j.- jng.Theoi 

The four teams winning leag: j s stoppec 
championships will be awarded i no t. Xhes 
ther T-shirts or a plaque. The awjuj: eX cuse to 
will be presented at the intrami* license pl< 
sports banquet, which will be heldt- other min 
December. Winners of the flag fci Wc 
ball tournament will also gain vat. complaini 
able points toward the owning t notorious 
floating trophy which will 
awarded to the overall outstandj: 
intramural team competing in t 
money sports. By LISA D 

As flag football draws to j Managlni 
end, the intramural volleyball touni To b 
ment draws near. Volleyball, anothr. an d to mo 



Gr 




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Students will receive a 10% discount on room rates 
DOUBLE $39.95 . SINGLE $29.95 
NIGHTCLUB - HOTEL - RESTAURANT ALL ON PREMISES 



HALLOWEEN PARTY 

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at 

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Don't miss the fun! 
Spend Halloween at Michael's 
Best Costume will receive a trip for 2 to 
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CALL FOR YOUR RESERVATION TODAY!!! 



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BOSSIER CITY, LOUISIANA 71111 
(318) 746-1550 



Hardy speaks to Northwestern 
students Thursday during a 
campaign stop in Natchitoches. 



money sport, begins next week wil j n jpc 
the officials' clinic set for Oct. 26-3 The 
between the BBB's, who are holding at and team captains' meeting Oct. 28 cil) is the j 
2-0, Sigma Sigma Sigma, with a record The volleyball jamboree w| social Gre 

of 2-1, and the Hooperettes who are 3- begin 5:30 p.m. Oct. 29 in the Intrami Northwes 
1. As with other leagues, this week's ral and P.E. Majors' gyms. supposed 

The 

national ft 

i sentatives 
I spring t 
i constitutio 
group and 
i seems as i 
' doing too i 
Rece: 
! complaints 
I violations 
Greeks. H< 
la wed as cr 
ered a part 
dents and 
i considered 
Then 
I to continut 
i it that somi 
I away with 
| reprimand 
I tion becaui 
Fore: 

Staf 

fiv SONYA 

NSU students get 10% discount with student I.D. j "/ .... .. 

• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••a* • Staff Write, 

First 

■that we hi 

|know exac 

{especially I 

■editor, and 

■Greg Kend 

Bike you tc 

Bions . . . ex 

itionsthattr 

■has been f 

psm, sensa< 

pise you m 

I wisl 

Ihe editori. 

jihe Current 

by Lisa Da 

lifference 1 

in editorial 

iter of ar 

Itis or her 

Subject mat 

'expressing 




TACO 'BELL 

Located on the Strip In Natchitoches 




Page 3 



Page 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



EDITORIAL 



October 20, 1987 



Students; drive with caution 



own 

in $ 



By MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
Staff Writer 



ho plays 
day. 



Demons beware! When Rally- 
ing in the Alley, don't rally too much. 
There's a pack of bears out there in the 
pen league „. dark that j ust i ove the ta Ste of rje- 

ip exists. The| m0 ns. And Chief Charles "Crusher- 
Kappa Alphas Gruber is the leader of the pack. 
' ^^ st ^aj" Crusher and his group of 

)f 5-1, and ft crus hees have sent the city of Shre- 
record of 4-lj • ve p rt into pandemonium. Gruber 
;ue stands wj nas introduced a series of roadblocks 

at 3-0 and ft —called DWI checkpoints by the 
U before, the- Shreveport Police— designed to 
uring the w a tackle the problem of drunken driv- 
day' s lineup. ,/ m g Yh e on \y problem is that every car 

winning leagp. j s stopped whether it is swerving or 
be awarded , no t. These roadblocks also give an 
jue. The awan: excuse to check for expired licenses, 

the intramut license plates, inspection stickers and 
h will be held,p other minor vehicular offenses, 
of the flag fof, VVe in Shreveport have been 

also gain va} complaining and fighting Gruber's 
the owning t notorious road blocks ever since they 
/hich will | 
rail outstandil 
mpeting in t 



were initiated. Even the city council 
has been fighting Gruber on his ac- 
tions. They voted the roadblocks 
down, but our illustrious mayor, John 
Hussey, felt that the roadblocks were 
needed to protect the glorious city of 
Shreveport that we all know and love, 
and vetoed the actions of the Shre- 
veport City Council. 

The roadblocks are more of a 
hassle than anything else. Yes, they 
have slowed down the number of 
drunkdrivers, but they have done this 
at the expense of the citizens and visi- 
tors of Shreveport. That is the reason 
for this brief but important statement. 

The roadblocks have caused 
several problems for many of the citi- 
zens of Shreveport. Delays have been 
the main problem caused by the road- 
blocks, especially since all cars are 
stopped, not just those suspected of 
drunken driving. The roadblocks are 
not announced and the location is 



*.epi scuci, so it is almost impossible 
to plan a night out around the barri- 
cades. 

Gruber often places his " check 
points" on roadscoming out of down- 
town Shreveport, particularly Clyde 
Fant Parkway and East Kings High- 
way. I assume the purposeofthis is to 
catch people coming from The 
Square. Of course we all know the 
condition of people coming from The 
Square in Shreveport. 

The police force will most 
likely be ready and willing for all of us 
Demons. They still may write several 
tickets, but they shouldn't have our 
names on them, because you have 
been warned. 

Rally in the Alley till you just 
can't rally no more, but don't let 
Crusher catch you having too much 
fun. Tough as it may be, the bears will 
just have to settle for Bulldog meat 
this year. 



Greeks should clean up act 

By LISA DARDEN . „ . . . - JT 



ill draws to j Managing Editor 

.lleyballtournt To borrow an age old phrase 
leyball, anothr and to modify it, "Something is rotten 
next week v& j n IFC." 

t for Oct. 26-; The IFC (Interfratemity Coun- 
eeting Oct. 28: cil) is the governing body of the male 
jamboree wj social Greek letter organizations at 
> in the Intrami Northwestern. Well, anyway, it's 
y ms ' supposed to be the governing body. 

The IFC is composed of nine 
national fraternities with two repre- 
fsentatives from each group. Last 
! spring the IFC revised their 
constitution in order to strengthen the 
group and its purpose. However, it 
seems as if the group is actually not 
doing too much. 

Recently I have heard several 
complaints from Greeks about hazing 
J violations committed by other 
Greeks. Hazing, which has been out- 
lawed as criminal, is no longer consid- 
ered a part of Greek life. Due to acci- 
dents and loss of life, hazing is now 
i considered a major Greek no-no. 

Then why are the acts allowed 
to continue at Northwestern? Why is 
I it that some groups are allowed to get 
1 away with such acts while others are 
\ reprimanded and placed on proba- 
j tion because of obscene behavior? 

For example, Omega Psi Phi has 



itch 

ranteed. 
e you 
;d and 
> weeks 
to $2.00 
sstaurant 



been placed on probation due to some that the Greeks should turn into tattle- 
crude remarks made during a Greek tales, but aren't they aware of how 
show. I'm not saying that the group other groups' actions damage their 
shouldn't be reprimanded (see own reputation? 
Wanda Hamilton's editorial on the In the constitution, one of the 
topic); however, I hardly think it fair IFC purposes is stated as: 'To uphold, 
that the Omega's charter be threat- maintain, and promote the standards, 
ened when another group is allowed policies, and regulations of the uni- 
to get away with more blatant and versity, designed to serve not only the 
harmful incidents. advancement of fraternities and stu- 

Why is one group allowed to dent life but also the welfare of the 
harass its pledges by firing guns institution as a whole." 
above their heads, pouring gunk over However, in Section XI on rules 
them, or by blindfolding them, plac- and policies, the IFC fails to mention 
ing them in a field and driving ve- any actions to be taken concerning 
hides nearby to frighten them? Why hazing violations, 
are they allowed to try and make As a Greek myself, I don't enjoy 
members conform to such standards seeing such incidents occur again and 
as specific hairstyles? Could it be be- again. Although the pranks may be 
cause this fraternity is just a group of done in good humor, they are no 
good ole boys who are out having a longer considered humorous if a seri- 
good time? Oust give them boys a slap ous accident results and the entire 
on the back of the hand and that will Greek system at Northwestern placed 
take care of it.) These incidents were in danger. 

related to me by a Greek adviser who Greeks are an important part of 
is unable to take any action until an- college life and I hope that Northwest- 
other group files a complaint or ern Greeks will strengthen their sys- 
tem by urging the IFC to take a firmer 



makes a statement. 

Why is it that other Greek or- 
ganizations allow these actions to take 
place? Isn't that what IFC is there for? 
Why are they placing the burden on 
the administration? I'm not saying 



stand on hazing and detrimental be- 
havior. It's time the IFC took some 
self-governing action and enforced 
probation fairly to all groups needing 
it. 



Staff writer explains media ethics 



D. 

• • • • 



]By SONYA RIGAUD 
• • • Staff Writer 

First of all, I would like to say 
that we here at the Current Sauce 
low exactly what we are doing, 
specially Lisa Darden, our managing 
litor, and — yes Mr. Jerome Cox — 
ireg Kendrick, our editor. I would 
like you to think over your accusa- 
ions . . . excuse me . . . your implica- 
tions that the staff at the Current Sauce 
las been practicing yellow journal- 
Ism, sensationalism and everything 
ilse you mentioned before. 

I wish you would read carefully 
the editorial in the Oct. 13 edition of 
ihe Current Sauce which was written 
»y Lisa Darden. It fully explains the 
ifference between a news story and 
editorial (among other things). The 
iter of an editorial is free to express 
lis or her feelings about a certain 
lubject matter. Mr. Kendrick was only 
sxpressing his personal opinion about 



your position as commissioner of 
elections in his editorial in the Oct. 6 
edition. Doesn't he have a right to do 

so? 

Something else seems to be 
bothering you. You seem to think the 
paper concentrates wholly on "the 
Cox brothers." Well, has Johnny's 
name been the center of attention for 
the past few weeks? I think not. The 
name I've been hearing over and over 
again is yours. , 

And, please, why shouldn't the 
Current Sauce cover you (and the SGA 
of course) as front-page news? Believe 
me, you and the SGA have been the 
biggest excitement around this cam- 
pus lately. The top front-page story is 
supposed to be the most important 
news of the day. I personally believe 
that all of this is very important to the 
students of Northwestern. 

One more thing I would like to 
add is that I do not feel you have done 



your job well. Of course you and I 
have different opinions. For example, 
among your many mistakes are 
Homecoming elections. You should 
have called the girls individually the 
night of the FIRST Homecoming elec- 
tion (or perhaps sooner, instead of 
stringing them along) to let them 
know what the problem was and that 
the whole election would have to be 
held over again. Also, on the night of 
the SECOND election you should 
have called these girls to give them the 
results. Most of them "heard it 
through the grapevine." 

I agree with Andy Harrison. 
There are those in SGA who are com- 
petent and will work to serve us well. 
We need to stand up and recognize 
these people. Hopefully, they may try 
to change the reputation of the Stu- 
dent Government Association for the 
better. 



Letters to the editor 

continued on page 5 




The commissioner of elections flips the coin for the State Fair Classic 

VGB,W) Us 




loL^k LUU I 





Dear Editor, 

I am not really concerned with 
people being mad at me, so I decided 
to address an issue everyone has 
commented on. This editorial should 
have appeared in last week's issue of 
the Current Sauce but it mysteriously 
disappeared. Thanks to that happen- 
ing, this editorial now has a deeper 
focus of what really happened. 

A few weeks ago the brothers 
of Phi Beta Sigma hosted a Greek 
show in A. A. Frederick's Fine Arts 
Auditorium. In competition were 
four fraternities and three sororities. 
Each group gave a performance to be 
judged . To end the show the sponsors, 
Phi Beta Sigma, stepped while the 
votes were being tallied. Each group's 
performance was fun and tastefully 
performed with the exception of one 
fraternity — Omega Psi Phi. 

Everyone knows that the over- 
all fun of a Greek show is to see who 
can out rank who. Everyone can stand 
to be talked about as long as it's in 
good fun. However, when the act is in 
such poor taste that the curtains have 
to be closed on the act — that's not 
clean-cut fun. The brothers of Omega 
Psi Phi apparently didn't know this. 
From the time they came out on stage 
they were totally obscene. 

To all the brothers of Omega 
Psi Phi who call themselves the Q- 
Dogs, I would like to suggest one 
thing if nothing else to you. Clean up 
your act. I believe you could take your 
act to Hotel 8 and make a porn movie. 
Your performance was striclty for a 
crowd at Stella's Massage Parlor. The 
chants you recited could have been 
thought up only by someone who 
thinks about sex 24 hours a day. 

I was extremely happy for one 
fact: the audience was mainly black. I 
wouldn't want people of other races 
to think that black young men get on 



stage in front of decent, intelligent 
people, act a complete fool and think 
its OK. In my opinion, the Omega's 
type of attitude is why black people 
have to work 10 times harder in order 
for others to believe we are a race of 
sensible,well informed people who 
are able to achieve the highest goals of 
education. 

I believe that if the Omega's 
take pride in themselves, they will be 
able to respect other people. When 
this change comes about the Omega's 
will no longer get on stage in front of 
a decent group of people and act like 
someone who has lived his whole life 
in the gutter on Skid Row. 

Blacks have come a long way in 
recent years and we still have a long 
way to go. I hate to think we have a 
group of young men who believe that 
sex makes them look like big men. To 
the fellows who do think this way I 
would like to tell you now, "You are 
sadly mistaken." 

In the 1987 Pot-pourri yearbook, 
the Omega's stated some very posi- 
tive things about their fraternity. 
Michael Mason was quoted as saying, 
"We are a very competitive fraternity 
and many of our members have been 
very successful in their careers." Now 
all the Omega's need to do is contact 
some of their older frat brothers and 
get some notes on how to behave like 
decent young men. They should use 
these instructions in their everyday 
contact with people. 

If I hadn't read the statement in 
the yearbook I would have thought 
the Omega's main goals were to put 
people down in the lowest way pos- 
sible, to make black men look stupid, 
and to try and show all females they 
have what it takes to be a man behind 
closed doors. 

From a proud black student, 
Wanda Hamilton — Staff Reporter 



Do you feel the Scholars' College should be a separate entity from Northwestern? 




t 





igela Williams 
Jew Orleans 
sychology 

"No, couldn't be totally 
oerate from Northwestern because 
he couldn't exisi without them. After 
I, they were here before we were. I do 
kink that we give them a better im- 
?c. J also think that we should have 
oerate classes from them, because 
s are honors students." 



Richard Scott 

Monroe 

Physics 

"Yes, we chose LSC for the 
advanced courses it has to offer, but 
we should still associate with North- 
western.'' 



Ricky Bergeron 
Donaldsonville 
Electronics 

"Yes, LSC students cannot 
associate often with regular North- 
western students because our cur- 
riculums require us to study and 
work every free chance tve get. We 
should notbe totally seperate, buthow 
can toe be the same?" 



Karen Lear 
Baton Rouge 
Psychology 

"Yes, because we have a more 
demanding curriculum, and more is 
expected of us." 



Christopher Lund 
New Orleans 
Law 



"I don't understand all the 
controversy.! don't think LSC should 
strive to be a seperate entity, but with 
our curriculum, how can it be 
helped?" 



CURRENT SAUCE 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 



LISA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 



KIRK COPEIAND 

Sports Editor 



MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
WANDA HAMILTON 
CHRIS HUNT 
BERTHA MAXIE 
DAN MEDUN 
CHRISTI RHYMES 
SONYA RIGAUD 
MICHELLE WEEGO 
Staff Writers 



ALLEN EVANS 

Advertising Manager 



EDD LEE 

Circulafion/Distrtoution 



TEDRIS SMITH 
WILLIAM FRANCO 

Photographers 



TOM WHITEHEAD 

Adviser 



The Current Sauce is 
published weekly during the fed 
and spring semesters by the stu- 
dents of Northwestern State Uni- 
versity of Louisiana. It Is nor asso- 
ciated with any of the 
University's departments and is 
financed independently. 

The Current Sauce Is 
based in the Office of Student 
Publications located in Kyser 
HaB. The office of the editorial 
staff is 225H. telephone (318) 
357-5456 The adviser's office is 
103 Kyser HaJ. telephone 357- 
5213. 

The mailing address for 
the Current Sauce is P.O. Box 
5306, NSU, Natchitoches, IA 
71497. 

Alt correspondence. In- 
cluding letters to the editor « 
welcome. Moteriaf submitted 
for consideration must be 
mailed to above address or 
brought to the office. 

The deadline for aO ad- 
vertising and copy is Friday by 3 
p.m. Inclusion of any and all 
material is left to the discretion of 
the editor. 

tetters to the editor 
should be typed (double- 
spaced) signed, and should in- 
clude a telephone number 
where the writer can be 
reached No anonymous letters 
will be printed. 

Current sauce subscrip- 
tion rates are S 1 1 per academic 
year (27 issues) or $6 per 
semester (14 issues). The paper Is 
entered as second-class mall at 
Natchitoches. LA. The USPS 
number is 140-660 



October 20, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 4 



Pag 
Lett 
Stu 

DearE 

to ansi 
recent 
Which 
Northv 
survey 

reads f 
pend l 
black o 
on cam 
the last 
last ele< 

4 

tics re! 
Current 
differer 
confide 
student 
men th 
read thi 
cent of 
also rea 
3 

black si 
cent of v 
of othei 

Stu< 

To the C 
T 

editorial 
Sauce O 
whom il 
dent on I 
addresst 
on this c 
L 

Mr. Kern 
page of 
Well, for 
on this c 
this sem 
with a jc 
If 

election, 
that nee 
body. Tr 
pers aro 
bad wit] 
were do 
ning, the 
for corre 



SPORTS 



Stoker leads NSU to comeback victory over SWT, 24-21 



By KIRK COPELAND 
Sports Editor 

Call them what you want but 
there is one thing you can not say 
about this year's Northwestern State 
Demons-that they are boring. 

After Saturday's last-minute 
24-21 victory over Southwest Texas 
State in San Marcos, Texas, you could 
even go so far as to say that the Men in 
Purple are an exciting team to watch. 
It was their third heart -stopper of the 
year but the first time they have come 
away with a win at the end of the 
game. 

Scott Stoker, coming off a bad 
game against Southwestern Louisi- 
ana, came on in the third quarter for 
Rusty Slack, who was making his first 
start since an injured hand against 
North Texas State put him out of ac- 
tion, and brought the Demons back 
from a 21-14 deficit. 

SWT took the early lead in the 
first quarter, driving 85 yards and 
scoring on a 42 yard aerial from Ron 
Rittiman to Eric Tennessee. Kyle 
Matlock added the point after giving 
the Bobcats a 7-0 advantage. 

Slack, who completed 5 of 13 
passes for 91 yards and one intercep- 
tion, got the Demons on track in their 
next possession, lofting a 34 yard 
touchdown pass to Mark Mayfield. 
Keith Hodnett's extra point knotted 
the score at seven. 

Once more the Bobcats turned 
in a drive of significant yardage as 
they moved the ball 80 yards in ten 

Demon volleyball, cross 



plays before second teamer David 
Haass clicked with tight end Matt 
Barber from two yards out for the 
score. Matlock drilled the kick and the 
Bobcats led 14-7 at halftime. 

The Demons then used some 
excellent special teams play to get on 
the board early in the second half. 
Demon Nick Golian broke through 
the line on a Bobcat punt and partially 
blocked the kick. Randolph Hayes 
recovered for the Fiery Ones and 
Slack again tied the score with a six 
yard TD to Floyd Turner. 

Slack was lifted later in the 
third quarter when he threw an errant 
pass that Bobcat safety Andre Horton 
returned 33 yards. Reggie Rivers then 
crashed over from two yards out to 
give the Bobcats a less-than-comfort- 
able 21-14 lead. 

Stoker then took over for the 
Purple Gang, completing his first four 
passes before the drive stalled at the 
Bobcat 11 yard line. Hodnett booted a 
28 yard field goal to pull the Demons 
to within four at 21-17. 

After a SWT punt, Stoker re- 
mained in control, leading North- 
western on a ten play, 48 yard drive. 
The penetration faltered on the South- 
west Texas 29 and Hodnett again trot- 
ted on to attempt a 46 yard field goal. 
This time, however, his effort went 
wide left. 

SWT sought to put the game 
away as they went on a ten play drive 
of its own. Matlock could not hit on a 
30 yard field goal, however, and the 

country, golf teams 



Demons had a glimmer of hope with 
just 3:27 left and 80 yards between 
them and the lead. 

Stoker hit tight end Orlan 
Lockhart for 15 yards to start off the 
drive. Then he found wide receiver Al 
Edwards for 35 yards down to the 
Bobcat 30. Four plays later the De- 
mons set up shop on the SWT nine 
yard line with less than a minute left to 
play. Stoker, who was named South- 
land Conference Player of the Week 
for his efforts, dropped back and hit 
Lockhart all alone in the end zone for 
the go-ahead touchdown. Hodnett 
converted the PAT and the Demons 
led 24-21 with 35 seconds to play. 

Game over, Demons win, 
right? Hold everything. 

The Bobcats took over at their 
own 30 and in two plays were on the 
Demon 37. The only thing working in 
Northwestern's favor was the score- 
board, which showed a three-point 
lead and nine seconds to play. 

Rittiman hit Tennessee across 
the middle and the speedster ran the 
ball down to the three yard line before 
cornerback David Chitman made a 
game-saving tackle ending the game. 

"I was scared," said Demon 
top dog Sam Good win after the game. 
"Probably more scared than against 
Northeast. They (Southwest Texas) 
had fewer yards to go and more time." 

The victory increases 
Northwestern's overall record to 3-3 
and Southland Conference record to 



2-2. Southwest Texas falls to 0-6 and 0- 
3. 

This week the Demons prepare 
for their traditional rivalry against 
Louisiana Tech at the State i" > : las- 
sie in Shreveport. Goodwin sa_ » that 
the Demons should gain an emotional 
advantage that they have not had in 
the previous two weeks. 

"We haven't had any intensity 
in either of our last two games," 
Goodwin said. "Our kids will get 
excited about playing Tech. We'll get 
that emotional edge that we've been 
missing." 

Northwestern's John 
Stephens, a preseason All-America 
candidate, will miss his third straight 
game due to a knee injury. Stephens 
underwent surgery last week to ex- 
amine cartilage in his right knee. No 
damage was found and the second 
leading rusher in NSU history should 
be ready to play in the October 31 
game against Sam Houston. 

This weekend's contest will be 
the last in the Tech-Northwestern 
series as the two teams will play dif- 
ferent schools at the State Fair next 
year. 

The clash is scheduled for 7 
p.m. Saturday at Independence Sta- 
dium in Shreveport. Tickets are avail- 
able in the fieldhouse for $5 with stu- 
dent ID (two per ID) and at the gate for 
$10. 




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see action, show mixed results during week 

called the showing at the NSU Invita- 



By CHRIS HUNT 
Staff Writer 

The Lady Demons' volleyball 
team opened up the Southland Con- 
ference season Saturday night by 
dropping three straight games to 
Northeast Louisiana here at Prather 
Coliseum. 

Their next conference game 
will be against North Texas State in 
Prather Coliseum this Thursday . 

Lady Demon coach Rickey 
McCalister is looking at the NTSU 
match as the key to the rest of the 
conference season and to the seeding 
of the conference tournament that will 
be held in Prather Coliseum Novem- 
ber 13-15. 

Meanwhile, Northwestern's 
cross country team has shown some 
vast improvements over previous ef- 
forts. NSU head coach Steve Thomas 



tional the best in three years. The 
Demons finished second in the meet. 

Ronald Wilkins finished fifth 
overall with a time of 28:13 followed 
by Gerard Semien (28:26), Mark 
Spikes (28:32), and Joe English at 
28:47. Ricky Carroll, a freshman, fin- 
ished fourteenth. 

Thomas is now shooting for a 
finish in the conference's top half in- 
stead of finishing in the second divi- 
sion. 

The women did not do as well, 
but Vicki Robarge turned in a good 
time of 20:58 over a three mile course. 

NSU's golf team will be head- 
ing for Huntsville, Texas, for a tourna- 
ment with Sam Houston State Wed- 
nesday at Elkins Lake Golf Course. 
The Demons will be looking for their 
first respectable finish this season af- 
ter a year and a half lay off. The 
tournament will last until Friday. 



Say What?! 




i\oo ■ 




Demon head man Sam Goodwin 
disputes an official's call in 
Saturday's 24-21 victory. Goodwin 
had reason to gripe as his squad 
was flagged 11 times for 91 yards. 






TEACHERS' PETS 




Michael Frierson 
and his wife, 
Martha Garrett, 
spend their week- 
ends filming lumps 
of clay. Their pur- 
pose: to make 
math fun. 
Math. . .fun? 



"Education through entertainment is the 
key to holding attention," says Frierson, a 
communications professor at Loyola Univer- 
sity. In their films, cone-shaped clay "knights," 
wearing positive or negative pennants, engage 
in humorous medieval battle scenes to show- 
how to add and subtract negative numbers. 
Frierson and Garrett did the films for the 
Children's Television Workshop series "Square 
One Television." seen weekday afternoons 
on PBS. 



Louisiana's Investor-Owned Electric Com- 
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young minds in basic high-tech studies. Pro- 
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intrigue children with math at the age when 
they usually turn it off, between 8 and 12. 

Appetites acquired early endure. 

The national MATHCOUNTS program con- 
tinues the effort to excite them in junior high 
through challenging, rewarding math com- 
petitions against other schools. In Louisiana, 
the LIOEC sponsors the competition admin- 
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ety, an affiliate of the National Society of 
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industries. 

As energy companies, we place top prior- 
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Letters to the Editor 



Student voters polled about SGA and Current Sauce 



Dear Editor, 

I conducted a survey designed 
to answer this question during the 
recent Mr. and Miss NSU election: 
Which students really care about 
Northwestern? The findings of my 
survey revealed the following: 

1. Whether or not a student 
reads the Current Sauce does not de- 
pend upon whether that student is 
black or white, male or female, lives 
on campus or off campus, or voted in 
the last election or did not vote in the 
last election. 

2. Of the student characteris- 
tics related to readership of the 
Current Sauce, the only significant 
difference at the 95 percent level of 
confidence was the class level of the 
student. Only 75 percent of the fresh- 
men that voted in the election also 
read the Current Sauce, while 95 per- 
cent of all other students that voted 
also read the Current Sauce. 

3. Although only 88 percent of 
black students compared to 93 per- 
cent of white students and 100 percent 
of other-race students said they read 



the Current Sauce, the difference was with 72 answering no for 20.7 percent, 

not statistically significant. 5 . ^ yo & u read the V Qurrent 

4. Only 74 percent of the black Sauce regularly? Of those questioned, 

students questioned said they had 320 said yes for 91.9 percent with 28 

voted m the last election compared to answering no for 8.1 percent. 

83 percent of the white students. The results of this study should 

Listed below are the actual put to rest any speculation that either 



statistical results of my Election Sur- 
vey study in which 348 students were 
polled: 

1. Class level: freshman - 86 
respondents, 24.7 percent; sopho- 
more - 72 respondents, 20.7 percent; 
junior - 85 respondents, 24.4 percent; 
senior - 96 respondents, 27.6 percent! elertions and 
and graduate - nine respondents, 2.6 Sauce. 
percent. 

2. Do you live on campus? Of 
the sample, 223 answered yes for 64.1 
percent with 125 answering no for Editor's note: 
25.9 percent. 

3. Ethnic background: black - 
100 respondents, 28.7 percent; white - 

236 respondents, 67.8 percent; and 
other - 12 respondents, 3.5 percent. 

4. Did you vote in the last 
election on campus? Of those partici- 
pating, 276 said yes for 79.3 percent 



black or white students are taking 
over student elections and any specu- 
lation that only black or white stu- 
dents read the campus newspaper. 
Campus elections and the Current 
Sauce are for all students. I strongly 
urge all students to participate in our 
to read our Current 



Student addresses Commissioner of Elections 



Alan Llorens 
Graduating senior 
Business/Marketing 
Llorens' survey was 
conducted during the Oct. 14 election 
held for Mr. and Miss NSU and the 
State Fair run-off. Llorens conducted 
the survey in the Student Union 
Lobby during the actual election and 
all respondents were voters. Only 
those reporting to the polls to vote 
were surveyed. 



To the Commissioner of Elections, 

This letter is in reference to the 
editorial that appeared in the Current 
Sauce Oct. 13. Since it was titled to 
whom it may concern, I feel as a stu- 
dent on this campus that the letter was 
addressed to me and other students 
on this campus. 

Let's see — was anything that 
Mr. Kendrick wrote about on the front 
page of the Current Sauce not true. 
Well, for starters most of the elections 
on this campus have been contested 
this semester, so I see nothing wrong 
with a journalist reporting the truth. 

If there is a contestation of an 
election, then that is a quality story 
that needs to be told to the student 
body. There wouldn't be any newspa- 
pers around if they didn't report the 
bad with the good. If the elections 
were done properly from the begin- 
ning, there would be no public outcry 
for corrections of the system. 



This would-be journalist is 
definitely brave enough to print this 
editorial because the election system 
has gotten way out of hand. My first 
duty is to report the facts and not my 
opinions. I don't feel as if anyone is 
out to get me; however, I do feel that 
the commissioner has a little guilt 
problem. I don't think it would be a 
shame to waste this space on how the 
mechanics of voting and elections are 
done. 

If the commissioner has 
enough concern about his office, then 
he would make sure thaTthe job is 
done correctly the first time. 

How can you keep holding an 
office that you are not qualified to 
hold? Why don't you, Mr. Commis- 
sioner, lay the blame in the correct 
place. There is no one else to blame, 
therefore be a man and take your 
punishment with dignity. 

As for the dust being on jour- 



nalism textbooks, sorry, there isn't 
any to be found since journalism stu- 
dents are always eager to learn more 
about their field. Mr. Commissioner 
you should look up some political 
ethics because you are the only one 
hurting your character. 

Well, Mr. Commissioner, if 
you could stop harping on how long 
you have been in office and pushing 
the blame off on someone else, just 
maybe your job could be done cor- 
rectly. 

The sad thing about this whole 
mess is the students are getting the 
short end of the stick. I'm glad you 
have no problem with this being a 
racial issue. However, I have a prob- 
lem with too many elections being 
contested and responsibilities being 
taken on your part Mr. Commis- 
sioner. 

Camilla Hood 




"1964" as the Beatles will be appearing at Northwestern Thursday as part of the State Fair Week activities. 
The four-man group plays tunes made popular by the Beatles during their touring stint in the 1960s. 



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Juniors-Misses 



Loneliness 
plagues 

pledge 

By WANDA HAMILTON 
Staff Writer 

The Random House College 
Dictionary defines unique as existing 
as the only one or as the sole example. 
This definition defines James 
Sweeney, the only member on line to 
become a member of Phi Beta Sigma 
national fraternity. 

Although, it wasn't his choice 
to be the only one on line it happened 
that way. Originally two men were on 
line but Sweeney's line brother quit 
the first night. That didn't bother 
Sweeney however; he continued his 
pledging. 

When asked how it feels to be 
the only person on line he simply 
replied," Lonely." 

Phi Beta Sigma currently has 13 
active members. The job of pleasing 
all the brothers can be hectic at times, 
but Sweeney is handling the job well. 
Sweeney said, "I never know what to 
expect from my big brothers and some 
days I don't know where I get my 
energy from." 

Sweeney is in his fourth and 
final week of pledging. 

"I have always followed the 
activities of the Sigma's because my 
older brother is one," Sweeney said . "I 
never really paid any attention to the 
Alpha's, Kappa's, or Omega's." 

Sweeney's older brother, Eric, 
graduated in the fall of 1986. Eric 
Sweeney was an industrial technol- 
ogy major and the cadet commander 
of ROTC at Northwestern. Eric 
Sweeney is currently a second lieuten- 
ant in the Army and will be going 
Airborne shortly. 

James Sweeney said now that 
he is in his last week of pledging, he is 
looking forward to life as a member of 
Phi Beta Sigma. 

Sweeney offered some advice 
to members of the Phi Beta Sigma 
intrest group know as the Squires and 
anyone else planning to pledge 
Sigma, "Before you become a Cresent 
make sure you have your heart into 
it." 



ISEP 



continued from page 1 

interesting experience. The bath- 
rooms are also coed and students 
have to knock before entering. 

Another interesting difference 
from American colleges is that sexist 
words are not allowed in the class- 
room. Dr. Burkhead used mankind 
and chairman as examples. 

Burkhead's father is Robert 
Burkhead of Natchitoches. 

ISEP is an exchange program 
available to full-time students or re- 
cent graduates. The program is based 
on one-to-one exchanges between 
colleges and universities in the United 
States and other countries. Nearly 100 
colleges and universities in other 
countries participate in ISEP. 

College tuition, meals, and 
room and board are paid to the home 
institution. The only expenses above 
what a student would normally pay at 
college are an ISEP fee, personal ex- 
penses, transportation to and from the 
exchange school and health insurance 
premiums. The ISEP 
Program fee is $165. Most forms of 
financial aid can be applied toward 
the ISEP program. 

Tommy Whitehead, ISEP coor- 
dinator for Northwestern, said, "I feel 
this is a unique opportunity for a 
Northwestern student to further their 
education and learn at campuses all 
over the world." 

For more information con- 
cerning ISEP, contact Whitehead in 
room 103 of Kyser Hall or call 357- 
5213. 

Tradition 

continued from page 1 

1950s or early 60s. They recalled live 
bands, many pep rallies, contests, 
games, door prizes and fights. These 
traditions still stand, at least through 
this weekend 

This weekend will see the end, 
for nowat least, to the traditional State 
Fair Classic between NSU and Tech. 
Don't despair though, for the Demons 
will still travel to Shreveport for a 
State Fairgame, we just won't be play- 
ing Tech anymore. 

Oh well, history has seen the 
Demons playing Tech off and on for 
76 years and history has a way of 
repeating itself. 



State Fair 

continued from page 1 

will attend an SGA brunch in Shre- 
veport along with Tech s court. Oth- 
ers attending the brunch will be the 
mayors of Natchitoches, Ruston and 
Shreveport, SGA and SAB members 
of both schools, faculty, alumni and 
families of court members. Cheer- 
leader;, from both schools will give a 
cheering presentation at the brunch. 

Rally in the Alley, located in 
Shreveport's Square, events include 
the presentation of the court at 12:30, 
the performance of 'The Trace Band" 
from 1 to 5:30 p.m., a pep rally at 2:30 
p.m. and Rally in the Alley games 
from 2:30 to 3:00 p.m.. 

The queen of the 1 987 State Fair 
Court is Tracy Lee of Natchitoches. A 
junior mapring in business admini- 
stration, she is being escorted at the 
game by SGA president Johnny Cox. 

The following are members of 
the 1987 court and their escorts for the 
State Fair game: Kirstcn Gcrnhauscr, 
junior physical education major from 
New Orleans, escorted by Senator 
Gcovanny Canizares; Nan Goss, jun- 
ior broadcast journalism major from 
Many, escorted by Senator David 
Wolfe; Rachel Heider, senior public 
relations major from Donaldsonvillc, 
escorted by Senator Andrew Harri- 
son; Yvette Jordan, senior nursing 
major, escorted by Senator Lawrence 
Sea wood; Darcy LcBlanc, senior early 
childhood education major from 
Sulphur, escorted by Vice President 
Dave DeCuir; Shwu-Fen I ec, junior 
computer information systems major 
from Taiwan, escorted by Senator 
Kevin Hopkins; Sonya Rigaud, junior 
journalism education/public rela- 
tions major from Morgan City, es- 
corted by Senator Michael McHalc; 
and Melody Smith, junior elementary 
education major from Leesville, es- 
corted by Senator Eliot Jones 



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Rape awareness seminal 

The University Police Depart 
ment at Northwestern is sponsoring 
two one-hour Rape Awareness Semi- 
nars Thursday Oct. 29. The seminars 
are open to the public and are sched- 
uled from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in room 
320 of the Student Union. No admis- 
sion will be charged. 

Each session of the seminars 
will be conducted by Erica Smith of 
the YWCA Rape Crisis Center of Shre- 
veport. Topics to be discussed during 
each of the two sessions include the 
functions of the YWCA Rape Crisis 
Center, rape and the law, date rape, 
and on and off-campus safety tips. A 
special film presentation as well as a 
period for questions and answers will 
also be held. 

For further information on the 
seminars contact University Police at 
357-5431. 

To obtain information or to re- 
quest one of the many services pro- 
vided by the YWCA Rape Crisis Cen- 
ter in Shreveport, call (318) 222-2116 
or write YWCA Rape Crisis Center, 
710 Travis Street, Shreveport, LA, 
71101. 



KNWD prizes 

The following people won 
prizes from KNWD's "Stairway to 
Heaven '87" marathon. To claim 
prizes, winners need to take their 
NSU IDs and go to KNWD located in 
Russell Hall. Prizes can be picked up 
from 2 to 5 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday. If unable to claim prizes 
during these hours, winners should 
call the station at 357-5693 for alterna- 
tive arrangements. The deadline to 
claim prizes is Oct. 21 . 

Winners are: Jerome Cox, Mar- 
lene Jennings, Ranie Blanchard, 
Robert Jones, Jason Best, Mary Atkins, 
Angela Mequet, Pearlie Williams, 
Hope Lacaze, Monica Grappe, 
Amanda Posen, Michele Buzbee, 
Michael Yakousk, Robert Noah, Wil- 
lie Hey, Johnny Hayes, Joseph Wein- 
ninson, Randy Vickers and John Bon- 
nette. 



Music recital 

Clarinetist James Gillespie and 
pianist Steven Harlos, faculty mem- 
bers of the School of Music at North 
Texas State University, will be pre- 
sented in a guest recital 8 p.m. Mon- 
day in A. A. Frederick's Recital Hall. 
The recital is open to the public with- 
out an admission charge. 

In addition to their evening 
program, Gillespie and Harlos will 
also conduct a clarinet and piano 
master class for Northwestern stu- 
dents Monday from 1:30 to 3 p.m. in 
the Recital Hall. The public is invited 
to attend the master class. 

For further information on the 
guest recital contact the Department 
of Music and Theater Arts at 357-4522. 



State Fair run 

1 he NSU ROTC Demon Battal- 
ion is sponsoring theannual Statu Fair 
Fun Run Friday. Cadets in the Demon 
Battalion will carry the ceremonial 
game football in a relay, from NSU to 
LSU-Shreveport. 

The Demon Battalion will run 
the entire 72 miles in order to raise 
money for the James Noe/ROTC col- 
lege scholarship fund. Each year two 
basic course cadets are awarded 
scholarships for their academic excel- 
lence in ROTC. 

Cadets from the battalion will 
be asking for donations and pledges. 

CenLa Center 

The Northwestern Small Busi- 
ness Development Center has set 
Wednesday, Oct. 28, as the day for the 
official opening of its new Central 
Louisiana Center in Alexandria. 

The NSU-SBDC CenLa Center i s 
located in the office building of the 
Kisatchie Delta Regional Planning 
and Development District, 5212 Rue 
Verd u n, for the purposes of provid ing 
information, counseling and special 
assistance to small businesses in Cen- 
tral Louisiana. 

Luker 

Brenda Luker of Baton Rouge, a 
graduate student at Northwestern 
won first place last weekend in the 
college-adult two-dimensional art 
category at the Louisiana Art and Folk 
Festival in Columbia. Luker, who is 
working on her master of arts in 
stained glass, won the division's top 
prize with an abstract landscape that 
she created in stained glass. 

Also at the same competition, 
Becky Woods of Natchitoches, who is 
working on her master of arts degree 
in painting, received an honorable 
mention in the painting division with 
her watercolor painting of a dove. 

Personal checks cashed 

Personal checks can be cashed 
for students at the cashier's office lo- 
cated in Roy Hall. A $25 limit has been 
set. Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. 

Darlene Rachal, manager of the 
University Bookstore, said she in- 
tends to restore check cashing at the 
book store by Oct. 16. 

Nursing majors 

The Departmental Reading and 
Arithmetic tests will be given Thurs- 
day, Oct. 22 inroom 138 of KyserHall. 
The Reading Test will begin at 4 p.m. 
The Arithmetic Test will begin at 5 
p.m. 

Students must have completed 
all English, reading and math devel- 
opmental courses to be eligible to take 
exams. 

Students are required to bring 
two ID's to gain entry into the exams. 



Le Leicle 1-rancais 

LeCerclt Fraixais held it-, regi; 
lar meeting Oct. 15 rhe organization 
will have a window wash on Oct 31 
from 2 to 6 p.m to raise money fur 
Mardi Gras. 

New members are still wel- 
come. Membership fees are S5. The 
next meeting is scheduled for Oct. 29. 

For more information call 357- 

9394. 

Phi Alpha Theta 

The Pi Chapter of Phi Alpha 
Theta hosted a luncheon for history 
majors and minors Sept. 29. The pur- 
pose of Phi Alpha Theta is to encour- 
age the study of history and help pre- 
serve local history. Members recently 
assisted as tour guides for the Levy 
House on the annual Tour of Homes. 

On Halloween the group will 
sponsor a bake sale, from 9 a.m. to 
noon, in front of Wal-Mart and a 
window wash at Maggio's Liquors, 
from 1 to 5 p.m. 

The next meeting will be 1 1 a.m. 
Oct. 27. 



Ghost chase 

The Natchitoches area Jaycees 
will host a Halloween Ghost Chase 
Oct. 31 to raise money for the 
organization's philanthropies and to 
provide the community with some 
Halloween fun. 

The ghost chase is a fun run 
consisting of two races: one mile and 
five-kilometer runs. 

The one mile run will begin at 8 
a.m. and the five-kilometer at 9 a.m. 
Both runs will begin and end at Ackel 
Brothers' Grocery and Market on the 
corner of Front Street and College 
Avenue. KZBL radio will be doing a 
live remote during the event. 

"The races will take runners 
through the NSU campus and on 
through beautiful historic downtown 
Natchitoches," Jaycee Billy Harring- 
ton said. 

Participants will receive a free 
T-shirt and free Miller Lite, Mountain 
Spring water or 10-K Thirst Quencher. 
Shower and dress facilities will be 
provided. 

"We also encourage runners to 
wear Halloween costumes," Harring- 
ton said. The first runner to cross the 
finish line wearing a Halloween cos- 
tume will be awarded a $50 savings 
bond. 



Trophies will be awarded for 
first and second places in male, female 
and different age categories. 

Entry fee is $8 for the five-kilo- 
meter run and $5 for the mile run. 
After Oct. 26 fees will be raised to $9 
and $6 consecutively. Deadline for 
entry is Oct. 31 at 8 a.m. 

To enter contact Harrington at 
352-4192 or write P.O. Box 603, 
Natchitoches, LA, 71458. 



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I light team 

The NSU Flight r-. arr , w»- .h 
fit-ishcvi toimn ovpral! .if th< .at . ial 



regional honors Oct 28-11 in Th<- 
bodaux. 

The National Intercollegiate 
Flying Association's Region IV Safety 
and Flight Evaluation Conference 
(SAFECON) will be hosted by 
Nicholls State University. 

The four-day regional meet will 
qualify the top three teams for the 
national championships to be held in 
Monroe in the spring of 1988. 

Students competing for the 
NSU Right Team are: Scott Bergeron, 
sophomore from Lecompte; F.J. Dol- 
phin, junior from Melrose; Robert 
Jones, sophomore from Natchitoches; 
Susan Mullins, freshman from Baton 
rouge; and Doug Sellers, sophomore 
from Morgan City. 

Students will compete in such 
events as practice landings, flight 
simulation, computer accuracy, navi- 
gation, power-on landing, aircraft 
recognition and message drops. 

For further information on the 
Flight Team or a%'iation science pro- 
gram at Northwestern call 357-5102. 



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Act more o 
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federal fina: 
lhat the stu 
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year," Faui 



ly SONYA I 
Itaff Writer 

With 
eft of the fal 
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CURR 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA 



VOL 76 NO. 14 




NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 71497 



Financial aid to enforce grade point average policy 



By GREG KENDRICK 
Edtior 



The Financial Aid Department 
ivill be enforcing a new grade point 
iverage policy which was adopted 
ast spring. The new policy will affect 
students receiving federal financial 
issistance such as grants, loans and 
rollege work study programs. 

Terry Faust, director of Finan- 
:ial Aid, said the new policy was insti- 
gated for the fall semester by the re- 
quest of President Robert Alost and 
was influenced by the Higher Au- 
horization Act, a bill passed by the 
4J.S. Congress. 

'The Higher Authorization 
Act more or less implies that higher 
education may maintain its present 
federal finance assistance but requires 
that the student retain at least a 2.0 
GPA by the end of their sophomore 
year," Faust said. "Our standards 



exceed these government standards. I 
would say our academic satisfactory 
standards are the second toughest in 
Louisiana, probably behind LSU." 

Faust said because the govern- 
ment has been cutting back on higher 
education financial aid, the trend 
throughout universities has been to 
raise the academic standards and 
award financial aid to students de- 
serving it. 

Faust said the previous finan- 
cial aid academic progress policy 
mandated only a 1 .5 GPA for all class 
levels. The new policy requires: a 1 .75 
GPA for all freshmen students taking 
six hours or more; a 2.0 GPA for all 
sophomores, juniors or seniors taking 
six hours or more; and a 3.0 GPA for 
all graduate students taking six hours 
or more. 

"We're giving the first year 
students a little break by offering a 
1.75 GPA minimum and all we are 



asking ior the upper class students is 
to maintain a 'C' average," Faust said. 

Students on financial aid, 
whose GPA falls below the minimum 
standards will not be eligible for any 
type of federal assistance until they 
meet minimum progress standards. 

To re-establish financial aid 
eligibility, students must complete 
one regular semester at their own 
expense and meet the minimum 
semester hours and GPA for their 
enrollment status. Remaining out of 
school one or more semesters will not 
change eligibility status. 

Faust said the Financial Aid 
Department will check fall semester 
grades by computer and notify stu- 
dents not meeting standards over the 
Christmas holidays. 

Faust said students have the 
right to contest the ineligibility but he 
or she must have a legitimate reason. 
"We have a committee set up to listen 



to the students' appeals but the reason 
better be valid. Most of the appeals are 
thrown out because of illegitmacy," 
Faust said. 

"I feel that all of the students 
have been thoroughly warned about 
our policy change," Faust said. "I 
placed statements in the Current Sauce 
last spring and all students with fed- 
eral financial assistance were notified 
when they received their financial aid 
award in the summer." 

"Most students won't lose 
their financial aid because they will 
realize what they will have to do to 
retain it," Faust said. "Most students 
on financial aid have the incentive to 
maintain their GPA." 

"We are not doing anything 
different from other universities," 
Faust said of the policy, "I just want 
the students to know what is at stajce." 



MINIMUM SATISFACTORY STANDARDS 


TO BE ELIGIBLE FOR FINANCIAL AID ASSITANCE 


CLASSIFICATION 


MINIMUM 




SEMESTER 




GPA 


FRESHMAN 6-29 HOURS 




Full-time student (12 or more hours) 


1.75 


3/4-time student (9-11 hours) 


1.75 


1/2-time student (6-8) 


1.75 


SOPHOMORE/ JUNIOR OR SENIOR 




30 HOURS AND ABOVE 




Full-time student (12 or more hours) 


2 


3.'4-time student (9-11 hours) 


2.0 


1/2-rime student (6-8 hours) 


2.0 


GRADUATE 




Full-time student (9 or more hours) 


3.0 


Part-time student (6-8 hours) 


3.0 







„ , ,_, U1 n uumiiiuiii emu an we are we nave a committee set up to listen tne students to know what is at stake " — i t . -t-vt- ■ ■ 

Registrar announces pre-registration For spring semester 



ly SONYA RIGAUD 
Staff Writer 

With only a little over a month 
eft of the fall semester, it is now time 
o pre-register for the upcoming 
pring semester. "We're working 
lard to get the process to be a little 
nore convenient and quicker for the 
tudents," said Linda Tabor, Regis- 
rar, of the pre-registration process. 

Tabor urges all continuing stu- 
lents to pre-register, but not to wait 
intil the last minute to do so. The 
pring schedule of classes are now 
ivailable to all students and can be 
ibtained in the University Bookstore. 

Tabor said that all students 



should first check to see if they have 
any holds. If so, these students need to 
pay their debts before beginning to 
pre-register. No one owing the uni- 
versity money will be allowed to reg- 
ister. 

Tabor would also like to re- 
mind students on probation not to 
pre-register. Academic status must be 
determined prior to the regular regis- 
tration period in January. 

According to Tabor, the regis- 
tration process should begin with 
advising. Students should make ap- 
pointments to see advisers early. 

Nursing students are required 
to make appointments with their 



advisers as soon as possible. This is 
because some of the advisers have to 
travel from Shreveport. 

Students who are pre-register- 
ing must see their advisers between 
October 27 and November 23. If any- 
one is unable to see an adviser and 
pre-register during this time, then he 
or she can pre-register between De- 
cember 1 and December 6. 

After meeting with an adviser, 
each student wishing to pre-register 
must have a student schedule request 
card completed and signed by the 
adviser. This completed card is a 
permit to register. Tabor said that 
everyone who is pre-registering must 



list alternate courses and alternate 
sections, if available, for each course. 
According to Tabor, this is very im- 
portant for students to remember 
when pre-registering. Cards without 
alternate sections and alternate 
courses that are available will not be 
processed. 

The student must then go to 
the cashier's office to pay a minimum 
of $25.00 as a pre-registration fee. 
Every student, whether on scholar- 
ship or not, must pay the pre-registra- 
tion fee. When this fee is paid, the 
student should receive a receipt. 

"It shows that you are serious 
in attending. It keeps an accurate ac- 



count of pre-registered students. 
Most schools charge a pre-registra- 
tion fee," Tabor said of the S25.00 fee. 

The student should then take 
the receipt and the completed student 
request card to the Registrar's Office. 
The student must have the card and 
receipt verified and leave the card in 
the office. The registration will be 
processed and the student may return 
to the Registrar's Office the next day, 
or the assigned date, to get his or her 
schedule for next semester. 

According to Tabor, some- 
where around 15 hundred students 
pre-registered last semester. She 
hopes to have more students pre-reg- 




Speaker/author encourages college preparation 



ister this semester. 

Tabor also said any student 
wishing to pay total fees may do so 
when pre-registering. 

No student may pre-register 
after December 6. Students who do 
not pre-register may meet with their 
advisers on January 7 or 8, or January 
11-13. 

Tabor would appreciate any 
cooperation received from the stu- 
dent body during this pre-registra- 
tion period. Any additional informa- 
tion may be obtained in the schedule 
of spring classes available in the Uni- 
versity Bookstore, or in the Registrar' s 
Office located in Roy Hall. 



By MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
Staff Writer 



speeches to businesses, professional 
associations and universities. 

In her speech, Scheele divided 
"Sustainers maintain safety working people into two categories: 
and achievers are willing to look sustainers and achievers. According 
silly," Dr. Adele Scheele said during a to Scheele, sustainers do their jobs 
luncheon for high school counselors well and unconsciously wait for rec- 
from around the state. ognition. Achievers work harder and 

The luncheon, held last Thurs- longer and are willing to take risks, 
day in the President's Room of the Scheele has written two books. 

Student Union, was part of a counsel- Her first, Skills for Success: A Guide to 
ors' workshop which was sponsored the Top for Men and Women, is based on 
by Northwestern's Admissions and the doctoral dissertation she wrote 
Recruiting Office. The luncheon was while attending UCLA. Scheele's see- 
the first function to be held in the ond book, Making College Pay Off, 
recently remodeled President's explains how to become a better stu- 
Room. Three columns, replicas of dent and to develop talents into a 
Northwestern's columns, stood in money-making career, 
one corner of the room, but the chan- Scheele said she found that 

deliers hung incomplete. birth, race, sex and education have no 

In addition to Scheele's speech, effect on the ability of a person to 
the highlight of the luncheon was the succeed. The real world doesn't pro- 
food served by ARA Food Service, mote a person like a school promotes 
Members of the audience applauded students. 

the food and luncheon which was Scheele also pointed out that 

organized by Marilyn Haley and undergraduate degrees do not always 



Dr. Susan Forward, author of the book "Men Who Hate 
Women and the Women Who Love Them", lectures to a 
Northwestern crowd last Thursday in the A. A. Fredericks 
Fine Arts Auditorium. Forward's lecture was geared to the 
changes of attitude within relationships. 



Craig Scott, Admissions counselors. 

Recognized nationally as a 
career strategist, Scheele serves as a 
consultant and presents seminars and 



turn out to be the future career for all 
students. Scheele asked the audience 
of about 70 high school counselors 
and Northwestern employees,"How 



many of you are doing what you stud- 
ied as an undergraduate." Only about 
five counselors raised their hands. 
Scheele said," I was supposed to be a 
' chemist. I'm not even a creative cook." 

Scheele encouraged students 
to get to know their professors. 
Scheele said getting to know a profes- 
sor includes more than asking about 
grades. Scheele said she believes 
showing an interest in a professor's 
own studies can help a student with 
contacts in their future. 

During her speech, Scheele 
promoted the concept of two years of 
national selective service for 17- and 
18-year-old students graduating from 
high school. Scheele said successful 
people who have participated in the 
service convinced her the strict atti- 
tude of the service can affect insight of 
a person. 

Scheele earned a doctorate 
with honors from UCLA as a Change 
Management Fellow. She received a 
master's as a fellow in English from 
California State University at 
Northridge and a bachelor's of sci- 
ence from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. 



Scheele who was a national 
syndicated columnist for King Fea- 
tures, quit her column in order to 
begin researching a third book. 
Scheele has also appeared on Today 
Show, Good Morning America, Hour 
Magazine, Over Easy and PM Maga- 
zine. 

Information and interviews of 
Scheele have appeared in such maga- 
zines as Money, National Business 
Employment Weekly, Working Woman, 
Savvy, Cosmopolitan, Journal, Success, 
Mademoiselle, Glamour and Vogue. 
Scheele will be featured on the cover 
ov the November issue of Reader's Di- 
gest and an article she wrote will be 
featured in the issue. An excerpt from 
the article recently appeared in the 
New York Times. 

Scheele has been a social de- 
signer for Social Engineering Tech- 
nology and a labor negotiator for the 
AFL-CIO. She has also served on the 
boards of Women in Business, the 
Center for Communication Ministry 
and the UCLA Deans' Council for the 
College of Letters and Sciences. 



Student Government Association holds monthly activities 



By WANDA HAMILTON 
Staff Writer 

The Student Government Asso- 
ciation (SGA) has planned a SGA 
Week to be held once a month at 
Northwestern. 

The first SGA Week was held 
Oct. 26-30 with several activities and 
events held including a local digni- 
tary day on Oct. 28. The purpose of 
SGA Week is to inform and entertain 
Northwestern students according to 
Vice President Dave DeCuir. SGA 
Week will feature speakers, activities 
and information to enlighten students 
on SGA and its purpose. 

The dignitary day featured area 
businessmen and leaders who gave 
brief pro-Northwestern, pro-Natchi- 
toches speeches. Held in the Cane 
River Room in the Student Union, the 



dignitaries spoke to a crowd of more 
than 30 students. All Northwestern 
students were invited to attend. 

State Rep. Jimmy Long was the 
keynote speaker. He opened the pro- 
gram with a speech on state politics 
and how it affects Northwestern. 
Long told the audience that North- 
western had no fears about the future 
of its well being. Long said he had 
spoken with newly elected Governor 
Buddy Roemer and that Roemer said 
he liked the direction in which North- 
western was moving. 

Other speakers included Betty 
Jones, Natchitoches Chamber of 
Commerce and Tourist Commission, 
and George Stanley of the Natchito- 
ches Parish School Board. Jones spoke 
on the help available to Northwestern 
students in Natchitoches and Hosed 



her speech with the comment that 
Natchitoches could not survive with- 
out Northwestern and its students. 
Stanley spoke on the importance of 
improving educational standards and 
the daily responsibilities of undertak- 
ing such a task. 

The last speaker was Natchito- 
ches Mayor Joe Sampite. Sampite dis- 
cussed the importance of students 
taking an active part in university life. 
Sampite encouraged listeners to take 
part and said, "The Demon football 
team could be having a better season if 
more students attended the games." 

Sampite then presented SGA 

President Johnny Cox with a Natchi- 
toches "Ready City" pin. 

Cox and DeCuir closed the pro- 
gram with brief speeches. Refresh- 
ments were then served. 



The program lasted little over 
an hour with the speakers getting 
right to the point in their speeches. 
The program, which could be termed 
a white-collar pep rally, is indicative 
of future programs to be offered dur- 
ing SGA Week. 

Also offered during the first 
SGA Week was informational booths 
which distributed SGA literature. The 
booths were set up in front of the 
dorms and in Iberville Dining Hall. 

DeCuir said the SGA would like 
to see 100 percent participation in 
future SGA functions. All students are 
encouraged to attend all SGA Week 
events. 

The next SGA Week is set for the 
last week in November. For more in- 
formation on the program, contact the 
SGA Office at 357-4501 or your repre- 
sentatives. 



ood and housing committee to adress student complaints to administration 



A Food and Housing Commit- 
composed of students has been 
*>rmed to work toward improving 
bom and board services at North- 
western. 

The committee meets twice a 
onth to discuss problems in each of 
e services. The hour long meetings 
*fe broken into 30-minute sessions 
Mth the first half covering food serv- 
M and the second half dealing with 
fusing. 
I 



During each session an admin- 
istrative representative from each 
area attends to help conduct the dis- 
cussion and to take note of sugges- 
tions and improvements that need to 
be made. 

The committee has made sev- 
eral suggestions including the idea 
that copies of weekly menus from 
both the Student Union and Iberville 
cafeterias be distributed to the dorms. 
Other suggestions include creating a 
health food \dietary line and the low- 
ering of food prices in the Student 
Union. 



'The committee will be voting 
on various issues on food service and 
housing to create a better atmosphere 
for the students here at NSU," Harold 
Boutte, director of Housing Admini- 
stration said. 

On housing issues, the 
committee has suggested that visita- 
tion hours be extended and that pro- 
tection covers be installed over the fire 
alarms to discourage students from 
pulling alarms. 

'The students on the Food and 
Housing Committee are encouraged 
to ask students around campus what 



they would like to see changed and 
the committee members are to bring 
up these issues in our meetings," 
Boutte said. 

"I think we are going to make a 
real difference in making NSU the 
best university around," committee 
member Kirk Long said. 

Committee members will also be 
responsible for distributing flyers to 
announce special events in Iberville 
Dining Hall such as shrimp and steak 
nights. 

The 35-member committee is com- 
posed of representatives from each 



floor in the dormitories. Some dormi- 
tory floors, however, have not elected 
representatives. 

Committee members include 
Kenny Adkens, Peter Rolufs, Ronald 
Strahan, Mike Thornton, Albert Lenz 
and Kirk Long from Bossier Hall. 
Boozeman Hall representatives are 
Julia Harlan, Christi Rhymes, Melanie 
Montith, Kim Patterson, Sarah Robin- 
son and Dana Linder. 

Tina Anderson, Felecia Hardy, 
Laura Cooper, Maria Burke and 
Tonya McGraw are the Natchitoches 
Hall representatives. Rapides Hall is 



represented by Scott Cooley, Paul 
Oenbrink, Kirt Brasseaux, Pernell 
Smith and Randall Treadway. 

Sabine Hall has the largest 
number of representatives with Cath- 
erine Evans, Sheryl Gill, Jennifer Al- 
len, Gail Spears, Debra Williams, 
Ginger Ingram, Daynell Broutlette, 
Michelle Hauck, Clara Davis, Sharon 
Hickerson, Cheryl Smith and Kelly 
Shotwell elected to serve on the 
committee. 



i 



Page 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



November 3, 198 



Northwestern student continues family tradition 



NEWS 



By LISA DARDEN 
Managing Editor 

Like Hank Williams Jr., Tho- 
mas Bradley Jr. of Metairie is carrying 
on a family tradition. 

Bradley, a freshman electron- 
ics engineering technology major, is 
carrying on a family tradition of at- 
tending Northwestern. Every decade 
since 1905, members of his family — 
including his parents, grandmother 
and great-grandmother — have at- 
tended Northwestern or Normal as 
the university was known in its early 
years. 

The tradition began when 
Cabrielle Briant Chabaud, Bradley's 
great-grandmother, came to Normal 
School in 1905 to become a teacher. 
Chabaud, who turned 100 in October, 
recently asked Bradley if the "tall 
white columns are still standing," a 
question she also asked her grand- 
daughter, Cheryl Chabaud Bradley in 
the 1960s. 

Ever since her arrival by train 
to Normal from Matthews, 
Chabaud's family has held a keen 
interest in Northwestern. Chabaud 



came to Normal as a young girl with 
long, black hair down to her knees. At 
that time, the train stopped at the gate 
of the school to let off students. Then- 
President Beverly Caldwell person- 
ally met most of the students who 
arrived by rail. 

When Chabaud attended 
Normal, 601 students were enrolled 
compared to the 6,000 students now 
enrolled. Chabaud said all the girls in 
her class stayed together as a group in 
the school's boarding facilities. Girls 
at that time wore black skirts and 
white blouses. 

Chabaud was involved in 
various campus organizations and 
said her favorite classes were piano 
and violin. 

Since that time 80 years ago, 
15membersof Chabaud's family have 
attended Northwestern including her 
great-grandson, Bradley, who is cur- 
rently attending. 

Bradley's parents, Thomas 
Bradley Sr. and Cheryl Chabaud Bra- 
dley, graduated from Northwestern 
in 1966. His grandmother, Flora 
Graves Bradley, graduated in 1937. 



Bradley has also had aunts, 
great-aunts and great-great-aunts 
and cousins attend Northwestern 
including Vera Ballard Hill, Sarah 
Ballard Keyes Fullilove, Neva Graves 
Noah, Maurice Graves Hill, Loneta 
Graves, Lessie Hardin Loyd, Bobby 
Leach, Quentin Loyd, Alma Bivens, 
Omah Bivens and Sarah Reneau. 

All of the women in the family 
who attended Normal or Northwest- 
ern — except Loneta Graves — became 
teachers. Graves retired from North- 
western in the late 1970s as vice presi- 
dent of financial affairs. 

Bradley said he decided to 
attend Northwestern because he was 
offered four scholarships and because 
he had spent the past four summers in 
Natchitoches visiting his aunt Loneta 
Graves. He said he had become famil- 
iar with Natchitoches and Northwest- 
ern during those summers. 

"I learned to drive on cam- 
pus," Bradley said of the summers. 

Bradley's older sister, how- 
ever, is attending the University of 
New Orleans. 

Like those before him, Bra- 



dley is taking an active part in life at 
Northwestern. He is employed in 
Russell Hall where he assists in labs 
and in repairing mechanical equip- 
ment. 

Bradley, along with student 
Nick Spann, helped repair the grand- 
father clock in Russell Hall and the 
chimes in the Fine Arts Center which 
can be heard across Northwestern's 
campus. Bradley also helped program 
a word processing package for the 
IBM personal computers in his de- 
partment. 

When asked why his family 
has attended Northwestern for so 
long, Bradley said, "We decided to 
come here because they've always 
had what we wanted." 

Bradley said he was attracted 
to Northwestern because of the Indus- 
trial Technology Department and 
their placement system. 

Of attending Northwestern, 
Bradley said, "NSU is living up to my 
expectations." 

Northwestern has not only 
lived up to Bradley's expectations but 
also to a long line of expectations from 
his family dating back more than 80 
years. 






Thomas Bradley Jr. 



Student Activities Board halts Rocky Horror; states safety threat 



By GREG KENDRICK 
Editor 

The Student Activities Board's 
(SAB) presentation of the "Rocky 
Horror Picture Show" ended early 
Halloween night, when SAB mem- 
bers believed the crowd was becom- 
ing uncontrollable inside the Student 
Union Ballroom. 

SAB Program Adviser Mar- 
jorie Poss said the movie was stopped 
because an excessive amount of water 
on the floor, objects being thrown and 
commotion from the crowd made the 
environment dangerous for the stu- 
dents. 

"It was an honest-to-God free- 
for-all and we had to make a decision 
for the benefit of the students of the 
university," Poss said. "Northwest- 
ern would have been liable for this 
situation if anybody would have been 
hurt. We had broken glass, water and 



shaving cream all over the floor. I was 
afraid of somebody slipping." 

Poss said before the movie 
started, SAB members announced to 
the audience that no objects were to be 
thrown toward the new film projec- 
tor, the sound system and the chande- 
lier. Earlier a water balloon had been 
thrown breaking a few glass covers on 
the ballroom chandelier. 

Poss said objects were thrown 
across the room and at the film projec- 
tor as soon as the lights dimmed. Fire- 
works were set off during the movie 
and groups of people were creating 
noise that was irrelevant to the 
"Rocky Horror Picture Show" plot. 
The movie is well known for its cult 
following and audience participation 
such as acting out scenes and replying 
to statements made by characters. 

"A lot people were not partici- 
pating with the movie. They were 
there just to cause trouble," Poss said. 



"Water, rice, shaving cream and eggs 
were thrown around the room with 
no regard to the sequence of events in 
the movie." The situation was particu- 
larly bad near the back of the room 
where Northwestern students were 
engaged in shaving cream, water bal- 
loon and water gun fights. 

The presentation was stopped 
when a live snake was set free and had 
to be killed by a Northwestern police 
officer, Poss said. 

Damage to the Student Union 
included water, rice, shaving cream 
and eggs on the floors and rugs of the 
ballroom, lobby and SAB office. 

"We had mustard and shaving 
cream on the sound system. Even the 
baby grand piano, which was tucked 
in the corner of the ballroom, was full 
of rice," Poss said. 

When cleaning up the next 
morning, Student Union custodians 
found a dead squirrel among the 



mess. 

Poss said the students causing 
the most disruption were the North- 
western students. "Our biggest prob- 
lem were with the Northwestern stu- 
dents, not with the Louisiana School 
kids or the townspeople. The students 
took full advantage of the situation 
and did not realize it was their own 
school property, fellow students and 
money they were putting in 
jeopardy." 

"We paid $516 for that movie. 
We are trying to do some big-time 
programming that big-time schools 
do and obviously Northwestern 
doesn't have the maturity to do this," 
Poss said. 

"It was a huge waste of money 
and it was the students' money. I 
wouldn't count on having the Ttocky 
Horror Picture Show' next year," Poss 
said. 



Author suggests behavior change 

bring those experiences and peop. 
into my life that nurture good feeling 
about myself. 

4. 1 will take responsibility ft 
my own cruel, critical, hurtful behav 
ior and stop trying to manipulal 
others with it. 

5. I resolve to confront thos 
people in situations that make m 
uncomfortable and I realize that 
have the option to remove myse' 
from these situations. 

6. As an adult I realize thj 
there may be a time when I may fe« 
distressed and /or depressed and 
promise to seek professional help 
when these are over prolonged peri 
ods." 

Forward also mentioned th 
double standards that exist for me 
and women. She cited such example 
as, "he drinks excessively while she' 
a lush and he's aggressive while she' 
pushy." 

In addition to being an authoi 
Forward is a psychologist and ha 
worked on several syndicated pro 
grams. She now travels giving lec 
tures on self-help. 



By SARAH BULLER 
Staff Writer 

On Oct. 29, Dr. Susan Forward 
visited Northwestern State Univer- 
sity as a featured speaker of the Dis- 
tinguished Lecture Series. Forward is 
the author of the book Men Who Hate 
Women and the Women Who Love Them, 
a 1987 best seller. 

Forward's lecture was geared 
toward changes in attitude. However, 
she also touched on changes in behav- 
ior patterns. 

"Change is the path to free- 
dom," Forward said. She named six 
promises to make to yourself when 
implementing change. They are: 

"1. 1 promise myself that I will 
begin to recognize those beliefs about 
myself in situations and in people in 
my life that make me sad, anxious and 
guilty. 

2 I will then recognize that I 
am an adult, I have options and 
choices, I am not helpless and I have 
the ability to make changes in my 
behavior and in my life. 

3. Nothing is more important 
than my self-esteem and I promise to 



4 \ 





TEACHERS' PETS 




Michael Frierson 
and his wife, 
Martha Garrett, 
spend their week- 
ends filming lumps 
of clay. Their pur- 
pose: to make 
math fun. 
Math... /k M ? 



"Education through entertainment is the 
key to holding attention," says Frierson, a 
communications professor at Loyola Univer- 
sity. In their films, cone-shaped clay "knights," 
wearing positive or negative pennants, engage 
in humorous medieval battle scenes to show 
how to add and subtract negative numbers. 
Frierson and Garrett did the films for the 
Children's Television Workshop series "Square 
One Television," seen weekday afternoons 
on PBS. 



Louisiana's Investor-Owned Electric Com- 
panies support efforts to inspire and develop 
young minds in basic high-tech studies. Pro- 
grams such as "Square One Television" help 
intrigue children with math at the age when 
they usually turn it off, between 8 and 12. 

Appetites acquired early endure. 

The national MATHCOUNTS program con- 
tinues the effort to excite them in junior high 
through challenging, rewarding math com- 
petitions against other schools. In Louisiana, 
the LIOEC sponsors the competition admin- 
istered by the Louisiana Engineering Soci- 
ety, an affiliate of the National Society of 
Professional Engineers, to help encourage 
young people to pursue careers in high-tech 
industries. 

As energy companies, we place top prior- 
ity on helping develop our state's future 
supply of scientists, mathematicians, and 
engineers. 



Infesting in your energy future 

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9r3, 198 



Page 3 



CURRENT SAUCE 



November 3, 1987 



NEWS EDITORIAL 




:hange 

tees and peop 
ire good feelinj 

esponsibility fc 
1, hurtful beha\ 
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> confront thos 
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Virgins spoil RHPS 



Dear Editor, 

The Rocky Horror Picture Show is 
meant to be an audience participation 
movie. What happened in the audi- 
ence this past Saturday night was not 
the participation that was required, 
however. This audience consisted 
mostly of students who had never 
seen the movie before. They had no 
idea what to scream (or throw) and 
when. Should the SAB have had a 
prescreening beforehand to prepare 
these unprepared students? There 
was a prescreening before last year's 
RHPS— six students showed up. 
Should the Current Sauce have run a 
story about the nature of the movie 
and what items were to be brought? 
Yes, but, again, a story detailing these 
ideas was run last year. The audience 
was just as wild last year as they were 
this year. 

Didn't the SAB learn anything by 
last year's damage to the SU Ball- 
room? 

We were very surprised that 
the SAB decided to run the movie 
again this year. We guess they be- 
lieved the students would be more 
behaved this year. Believing this also, 



KNWD agreed to co-sponsor RHPS 
with the SAB. 

Going into the movie, we predicted 
some wildness from the audience. We 
knew we would be pelted with rice 
everytime we blinked. We did not 
expect eggs, (where in the movie do 
any of the characters throw eggs?) or a 
live snake to be thrown. 

The SAB stopped the movie 
about halfway through because of the 
audience's conduct. We can under- 
stand that, but we do not understand 
why they failed to foresee all of the 
wildness beforehand and not show 
the movie entirely. If the SAB brings 
back the RHPS next year (which we 
doubt, but that's what we said last 
year), KNWD will not co-sponsor the 
movie. If you really want to see it the 
way it is intended to be seen, go to 
Shreveport or Alexandria. North- 
western is just not ready for the Rocky 
Horror Picture Show. 

Marshal Carll 
KNWD Manager 
& 

Jeff "Drift" Richard 
Morning D.J. and egg victim 




Fje NSU Body Shows "TFieir Appreciation ^g^~IowQrd The Editor for Allowing 

m ^ 7ik ^3* - cs> de ^ To Voice Opinions. 





Northwestern/Scholars' College dispute addressed 



By LISA DARDEN 
Managing Editor 

OK folks, this is getting a little 
out of hand. I'm talking about the 
notorious Northwestern/Scholars' 
College dispute. 

Although the subject was 
brought to light recently through cur- 
rent quotes and letters to the editor in 
the Current Sauce, there have been 
grumblings about the issue since the 
semester started. 

I believe the real issue, how- 
ever, has been overlooked. Students 
are standing on opposite sides of a 
fence pointing fingers and accusing 
each other when we really ought to be 
looking in the same direction pointing 
a finger. Both schools have been made 
promises which may be responsible 
for sparking the controversy. The 
Scholars' College was promised the 
moon and Northwestern was prom- 



ised that sacrifices in their lifestyles 
would not be made due to the Schol- 
ars' College. Although both groups 
should expect the promises to be kept, 
we shouldn't blame each other if the 
treaty is broken. 

As for the two schools being 
separate entities — poopy. We need 
each other. Northwestern could use 
an academic boost and Scholars' Col- 
lege needs buildings, classrooms, 
dormitories, dining halls and some 
form of student life. We should take 
advantage of what we have to offer 
each other rather than fighting over 
the table scraps. 

However, a few interesting 
facts have been brought to light as a 
result of the dispute. Some (not all) of 
the Scholars' students are acting like 
spoiled children. I would just like to 
remind them of a few facts. Fact #1 - 
you are a freshman and so is the Schol- 



ars' College. This fact means that 
upperclassmen enrolled at North- 
western did not have the option of 
attending a Scholars's College. This 
does not make them any less intelli- 
gent or capable than yourself. Fact #2 
- some of the freshmen enrolled at 
Northwestern chose (yes, chose) not 
to attend Scholars' College. They in- 
stead enrolled at Northwestern in 
order to get a more specific degree. 
Does this make them stupid and not 
so special? Fact #3 - No one likes a 
pompous ass. Maybe a few classes in 
humility should be added to the 
Scholars' College curriculum. 

Now jumping to the other 
side of the fence. Some of the North- 
western students are acting like the 
first-born when the parents bring 
little brother home from the hospital. 
You can only expect that little brother 
will be the center of attention at first. 



However, the parents should 
not forget the first child. 

A few recommendations for 
whoever's in charge. Try to break a 
few of the barriers existing between 
the two schools. For example, we all 
know that the Scholar's College is 
supposed to be a more advanced cur- 
riculum in which the students have to 
work a little harder; however, open up 
some of the classes for Northwestern 
students who have shown an interest 
and ability in a specific area. Instead of 
turning away students who have a 
desire to leam, invite them to the 
classes. At an institutuion of higher 
learning, we certainly wouldn't want 
to be accused of stifling the desire to 
learn. 

Another suggestion. Don't 
instill a feeling of superiority in the 
Scholars' College students. A well 
rounded and educated person is one 



who not only knows the books but 
also how to get along with others, how 
to work with people on a different 
intelligence and emotional level than 
himself (whether it be higher or lower 
is not the issue). Teach your students 
the importance of respect of others. 
These skills are often learned outside 
of the classroom in such extracurricu- 
lar activities as clubs and various 
organizations. We've invited the 
scholars over to play with us. It would 
be nice if the feeling was mutual. 



As you can see, we both have 
much to gain from each other. To the 
students I suggest we put the petty 
differences aside and make the most 
of our college career — in both aca- 
demics and extracurriclar aspects. 
Let's not break up our Northwestern 
family. 



Editor advocates unity among Scholars ' College and Northwestern students 



By GREG KENDRICK 
Editor 



One of the worst dilemmas 
that bog down the functionsof a learn- 
ing institution is strife among the stu- 
dent body. Internal conflict produces 
a barrier in communication that shat- 
ters the united opinion of the student 
body. 

Many Northwestern students 
consider the suggestion by a few 
Louisiana Scholars' College students 
to be recognized as a seperate entity 
from Northwestern as a far fetched 
and selfish idea which deals with an 
issue of ego rather than practicality. 
But before the Northwestern students 
persecute these select Scholars' Col- 
lege students for making such a sug- 
gestion they should place themselves 
in their shoes. Do not get me wrong. I 
do not advocate the seperation be- 
tween Scholars' College and NSU, but 

I do sympathize with the Scholars' 
College student's point of view. 

Try to imagine what it is like to 
be handful of freshmen, thrown into a 



newly created learning institution, 
without the guidance of experienced 
peers — upperclassmen — , nor the 
guarantee that the program will ex- 
hist next year — the election of Buddy 
Roemer, and the higher education 
policies that came with it. Add to this 
dilemma the idea that the foundations 
of the new college is built on settled 
and somewhat claimed territory. 
Perhaps 'claimed' isn't the word I 
should use, but let's admit it . The utili- 
zation of the concept 'radical change' 
has limitations in this part of the coun- 
try. 

These apposing factions 
would cause any minority group — 
and the Scholars' College students are 
presently a minority group — to band 
together and seek recognition. Many 
Scholars' College students are suffer- 
ing an identity crises and I don't 

blame them. 

This is no time to point fingers. 
Everybody is more or less at fault. 
Most NSU students greeted these se- 
lect few with territorial chips on their 



shoulders. Hell, I was one of them. If 
a Northwestern student were to stand 
back and contemplate exactly what 
creature comforts a Scholars' College 
student has over an average student, 
he or she would discover about two or 
three more cubic feet of carpet, colder 
water fountains, and a couple-of- 
hundred micro chips. I find the bitch- 
ings of most Northwestern students 
toward the Scholars' College living 
conditions rather trivial. 



The Scholars' College students 
have put forth very little effort to 
communicate with the Northwestern 
body, though they have the means to 
do so. To sight an example: I received 
a tongue lashing on the telephone by 
several Scholars' College students 
who were disgruntled about my pub- 
lishing a letter to the editor that had 
several anti-Scholars' College impli- 
cations. The warning of several 
strong rebuttals were implied from 
these conversations. To make a long 
story short; it is 10 p.m. publication 
night, and there is not one letter to the 



editor by a Scholars' College student. 

The administration planted 
the seeds of this flourishing dilemma. 
What did they expect to happen when 
an individual group is isolated from 
the student body in a seperate living 
environment. The concept of NSU 
and Scholars' College functioning as 
one entity is contradicted when they 
do not thrive in the same living envi- 
ronment. The administration has 
created situation that can be related to 
neighborhood rivalry — the boys from 
seperate sides of the track. 

The victim of this entire sod- 
ded affair is the student affairs of the 
student body. Not the Northwestern 
student body, nor the Scholars' Col- 
lege student body, but the entire stu- 
dent body is being affected. The idea 
of seperatism could be used as a tool 
against the entire university when it 
comes time for playing political pay- 
back. I invision many Louisiana legis- 
latures, possessing the vision of re- 
solving the Louisiana deficit through 
the elimination of higher education 



costs, licking their chops at a learning 
institution that stands divided in stu- 
dent body recognition. 

There are several factions that 
would shatter the idea of seperatism. 
Presently, the SGA has three out of 21 
senate positions filled by Scholars' 
College students. Perhaps more rep- 
resentation in this organization by the 
Scholars' College will bring out the 
issues they wish to address while 
enhancing the performance of the 
organization. Any extracurricular 
function, such as intramurals, would 
promote a healthy competition be- 
tween students rather than venemous 
fingerpointing. A grievance commit- 
tee would be the ultimate solution, 
having a balance amount of represen- 
tation by both sides, regulated by an 
administrative member, would iron 
out a majority of the complaints. 

I am sure that each side of the 
seperatism debate has valid argue- 
ments for support, but before another 
accusation, complaint, or arguement 
is sparked, think of the consequences 
it may have on this learning institu- 
tion as a whole. 



Letter to the editor, see page five 



Do you feel that there should be a break after midterm? 






PSSiP <W lr il WHBIft ■M m 



m 




Lisa Thomas 
3-1, Ad Design 
Ringgold 



Frankie Campbell 
4-1, Social Work 
Shreveport 



Laurie Gaden 
4-1, Photography 
New Orleans 



Dennis Holmes 
2-2, Broadcasting 
Montgomery 



Jeff Kilgo 

4-2, Photography 
Pineville 



I think so, because a break Yes, because we should be " No, take spring break for ' Yes, because it gives a per- " I believe a break would be 

helps people regroup and concentrate entitled to a break for all of our effort example. How many people do you son a chance to relax and regroup appropriate to let students catch their 

better. I'm for any breaks." and hard work, so we: 11 be more sue- know actually crack a book? Besides, before starting another continuous breaths and get ready for finals." 

cessful for finals." it's hard to get back into the swing of session of studies." 

things after a break." 



CURRENT SAUCE 



GREG KENDR1CK 

Editor 



LISA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 



KIRK COPEIAND 

Sports Editor 



MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
WANDA HAMH.TON 
CHRIST! RHYMES 
SONY A RIGAUD 
MICHELLE WEEGO 
Staff Writers 



ALLEN EVANS 

Advertising Manager 



EDD LEE 

Circulation/Distribution 



TEDRIS SMITH 
WILLIAM FRANCO 

Photographers 



TOM WHITEHEAD 

Adviser 



The Current Sauce is 
published weekly during the fall 
and spring semesters by the stu- 
dents of Northwestern State Uni- 
versity of Louisiana. It is nor asso- 
ciated with any of the 
University's departments and is 
financed independently. 

The Current Sauce is 
based in the Office of Student 
Publications located in Kyser 
Hall. The office of the editorial 
staff is 225H. telephone (318) 
357-5456. The adviser's office is 
103 Kyser Hall, telephone 357- 
5213. 

The mailing address for 
the Current Sauce is P.O. Box 
5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 
71497. 

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Tha deadline for all ad- 
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p.m. Inclusion of any and all 
material is left to the discretion of 
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Letters to the editor 
should be typed (double- 
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Current sauce subscrip- 
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entered as second-class mail at 
Natchitoches. LA. The USPS 
number is 140-660 



Page 4 



November 3, 1987 



SPORTS 



Turner scores three touchdowns for SHSU 
as Bearkats capture 34-7 victory over NSU 



By KIRK COPELAND 
sporti Editor 

It's becoming an all too famil- 
iar sound from the stadium loud- 
speaker, 

". . . and the Demons turn the 
ball over . . ." 

Northwestern State again gave 
a course in ineptitude Saturday as 
they turned the ball over to the Bear- 
kats of Sam Houston State five times 
to go along with eight penalties for 75 
yard s as they came up on the short end 
of a 34-7 shellacking. 

"We got our butt kicked," 
Demon top man Sam Goodwin said 
when asked to summarize the game. 

The loss marked the second 
straight massacre that the Men in 
Purple have suffered (last week it was 
23-0 to Louisiana Tech) and fourth 
straight game that the Demons have 
had no running game to speak of. 
Northwestern had just 96 yards on the 
ground, marking the fourth consecu- 
tive time the Fiery Ones have been 
held under the century mark in total 
rushing. 

Sam Houston got off on the 
right foot by taking the opening kick- 
off and driving 79yardsonll plays to 
start the scoring. Tailback Luther 
Turner did the honors, going ten 
yards for the first of his three touch- 
downs. Billy Hayes clicked on the 
point after attempt giving the Bear- 
kats a 7-0 advantage with 9:54 still to 
play in the first quarter. 

After the initial drive, the NSU 
defense got tough, allowing only 75 
total yards for the remainder of the 
first half. Unfortunately, the Demon 
of fense could get nothing going, gain- 
u%i mere 20 yards, all on the ground, 
in the opening half. 

Late in the second quarter. 



SLC holds contest 
for replacement 
of official logo 



By KIRK COPELAND 
Sport Editor 

Southland Conference officials 
have become bored with their current 
logo. 

So what are they planning to 
do about it? 

Hold a contest to improve or 
replace it, of course. 

The contest, sponsored by the 
Southland Conference with coopera- 
tion from the sports information di- 
rectors from member schools, is open 
to any person connected in any way to 
the SLC, including students, faculty 
members, staff members, and boost- 
ers. 

According to Northwestern 
State Sports Information Director 
Tom Wancho, the school is holding a 
separate contest with the best entry 
receiving a $20 prize and entry into 
the conference contest, where it will 
be eligible to win the $100 top prize. 

All entries for the NSU contest 
will be judged by Wancho. The con- 
ference entries will be judged by fac- 
ulty representives from the confer- 
ence. 

Entries must be submitted on 
an 8 1/2 x 11 sheet of paper in two 
colors and /or black and white. 

Deadline for entry is December 
1 and all entries should be submitted 
to Tom Wancho in the Sports Informa- 
tion Director's office in Prather Coli- 
seum. 




Mike O'Neal bulls his way into 

the Sam Houston State defense 
in Saturday's game with the 
Bearkats in Huntsville. O'Neal 
was the NSU offense as he 
scored the Demons only points 
of the day on a one yard dive. 

Hayes broke a school record with a 
booming 54 yard field goal. North- 
western tailback John Stephens then 
fumbled the ball away on the next 
possession at the Demon 16 yard line 
and Hayes popped in another three- 
pointer, this time from 23 yards out, to 
give SHSU a 13-0 halftime lead. 

Scott Stoker opened the second 
half by tossing an interception to 
safety Billy Anderson who returned 
the ball to the NSU eight yard line. 
Reggie Lewis then converted the turn- 
over into points for the Bearkats by 
passing the remaining yardage to 
Ricky Eggleston for the six, giving 
Sam Houston a lofty 20-0 bulge. 

Just passing the time . . . 

yt 



Northwestern State turned in 
its most impressive showing since the 
Southwest Texas victory on the next 
drive, going 80 yards in 12 plays while 
consuming 5:54 of the game clock 
Mike ONeal took it in from a yard out 
and, after Keith Hodnett's PAT, the 
Demons were still at a 20-7 disadvan- 
tage. 

SHSU did not blink as they 
drove the ball the distance of the field 
on their next possession, capping the 
drive with a 14 yard scamper by 
Turner. 

Stoker was again picked off, 
this time on the first play of the final 
stanza, by Anderson, who returned 
the gift 27 yards, setting up the final 
points of the day. Again it was Turner, 
this time from one yard away, giving 
the Bearkats their final 34-7 advan- 
tage. 

"We didn't execute the wish- 
bone very well," Goodwin said. 
"They got into a different defense that 
they haven't played in two years and 
it confused our halfbacks. Plus we 
didn't execute. Our defense played 
very well after that first drive and up 
until that screen pass (a 48 yarder to 
Jerry Waddy in the third quarter that 
set up SHSU's third touchdown). 
Without that and our two intercep- 
tions and fumble, I don't believe they 
would have scored as much as they 
did." 

Nicholls State is next for the 
Demons, now 3-5 overall and 2-3 in 
conference play. The Colonels own a 
4-4-1 record after last week's 23-17 
loss at the hands of the Zips of Akron, 
their third straight setback. 

The Demons meet the Colonels 
at 7 p.m. in John L. Guidry Stadium 
Saturday on the campus of Nicholls 
State in Thibodaux, Louisiana. 



Cross country has poor showing 




Lineman Nick Day holds off a Bearkat defender as Northwestern 

State quarterback Scott Stoker fires a pass into the flats. Stoker was 
one of three different quarterbacks head coach Sam Goodwin used 
Saturday in an attempt to revitalize the Demon offensive attack. 




By TOM WANCHO 
Sports Information 

Northwestern State put its 
worst foot forward in Monday's 
Southland Conference cross country 
championships, held on the campus 
of North Texas State University in 
Denton, Texas. 

The NSU men, which enjoyed 
several successful outings toward the 

Lady Demon 
volleyballers 
lose in three 

By BRUCE GROEN 
Sports Information 

"So close, but yet so far," is 
how head volleyball coach described 
the Lady Demons' second game with 
Southwest Texas State, ranked sev- 
enth in the Southern Region, Monday 
night. NSU dropped the game 12-15, 
but was at one time leading 11-4. The 
Bobcats took easy wins in games one 
!4-15) and three (3-15). 

The Lady Demons, 11-10 over- 
all, play Sam Houston State in the final 
Southland Conference matchup on 
Tuesday night. NSU travels to 
Nicholls State Thursday night and 
will finish the season at Southeastern 
Louisiana on Friday night. 

NSU, now 2-4 in conference 
play, will host the Southland Confer- 
ence Tournament November 15, 16, 
and 17. The double-elimination event 
begins at 1 p.m. on Sunday and wraps 
up at 10 a.m. on Tuesday morning. 



season's latter half, placed seventh in 
the eight team field while the Lady 
Demons weren't even that produc- 
tive, finishing dead last. 

The Demons finished ahead of 
only Sam Houston State, a program 
that is in its first year of competition. 
With 164 points, NSU trailed sixth 
place McNeeseState by 24 points with 
champion North Texas State's final 
tally of 52 points way out of site. 

The Lady Demons wound up 

Take that! 



with 232 points, quite a ways from 
Stephen F. Austin's top total of 55 and 
even a way behind seventh place Sam 
Houston State's 168. 

Joe English was the top Demon 
runner, crossing the finish line in 16th 
place overall with a time of 26:24 over 
the five mile course. Vicki Robarge, as 
hasbeen thecaseallyear, finished first 
among the Lady Demons with a 32nd 
place time of 19:58 for three miles. 




A Lady Demon goes up to spike the ball in the face of a defender. 
The Ladies were roughed up Monday night 15-4, 15-12, 15-3. 



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CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 5 



NEWS 



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a ways from 
otalof55 and 
ith place Sam 



ie top Demon 
sh line in 16th 
> of 26:24 over 
k.i Robarge, as 
, finished first 
is with a 32nd 
nree miles. 





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Fraternity counselor addresses greek hazing issue 



Dear Editor, 

I read with no little interest Lisa 
Darden's editorial on Greek hazing. I 
have been an adviser to Theta Chi 
Fraternity on this campus since 1971 
and I currently serve as a deputy re- 
gional counselor for our national of- 
fice, supervising our chapters in Ar- . 
kansas, Louisiana and Texas. We ef- ' 
fectively eliminated hazing of pledges 
from Theta Chi on this campus some 
years ago. Nationally we have taken a 
very strong stand against hazing. As a 
member of the National Interfrater- 
nity Council (NIC) Theta Chi sup- 
ports the NIC policy statement oppos- 
ing hazing. 

There is no excuse for hazing. In 
any fraternity, those who support 
hazing are almost invariably those 
members who sit in the back row, who 
never participate in other campus 
activities, who can only maintain their 
status within the chapter by defend- 
ing and supporting hazing. These are 
the members who only find self worth 
in the humiliation and subjugation of 
others. It is an immature form of be- 
havior that reflects their own lack of 
personal value or self respect. 

These members will advance 
the argument that hazing builds unity 
within the pledge class. They are, to 
some extent, correct. Those pledges 
who remain frequently do become a 
tight-knit group. However, it cannot 
be satisfactorily explained to me how 
it serves a chapter to have three or four 
tight cliques within that chapter, each 
pulling their own way to the exclusion 



of others. Furthermore, each of those 
cliques is composed solely of brothers 
from a single pledge class. That situ- 
ation is not representative of theobjec- 
tive of brotherhood that a fraternity 
supposedly espouses. 

There are also strong legal argu- 
ments against hazing. The simplest, 
most innocent hazing incident can 
lead to serious injury or even death. 
Most of the eight or so deaths that 
have resulted from fraternity hazing 
in recent years have been alcohol re- 
lated. Most of these deaths have been 
due to the stupid and immature inges- 
tion of a quantity of alcohol sufficient 
to suppress respiration and central 
nervous system activity resulting in 
death attributable to alcohol poison- 
ing. In our society one of the unfortu- 
nate rites of passage from childhood 
to adulthood is all too frequently cen- 
tered on alcohol abuse. Tragically, too 
many children never make it to adult- 
hood. This is not a problem associated 
only with fraternities, but is pandemic 
in the late adolescent subculture. It is 
a problem that simply becomes a fo- 
cus of attention when associated with 
hazing in fraternities. 

A fraternity and its officers are 
legally responsible for deaths or inju- 
ries resulting from hazing incidents. 
A young man who has been honored 
by his peers and elected to the office of 
president of his chapter may sud- 
denly, as the result of a hazing inci- 
dent, find his world crumbling 
around him. He may find himself the 
primary target of a criminal investiga- 



tion as well as litigation. While it may 
be possible to find a jury that might 
not convict him on the criminal 
charges, you can bet that in a civil 
action a jury will find on behalf of the 
plaintiff. Furthermore, the size of the 
settlement, if history repeats, will be 
quite large. 

I wish that I could say that 
across the country Theta Chi has 
completely wiped out hazing in its 
undergraduate chapters. While we 
have made great strides, I suspect that 
there are still a few among our 186 
chapters where hazing occurs on 
some scale. Unfortunately these 
groups go to great lengths to hide 
their hazing from their national offi- 
cers and representatives. I suspect 
that is the cause with the group 
Darden chided for hazing on this 
campus. I know that the group's na- 
tional organization is a member of the 
NIC, so I know the national 
organization's position is opposed to 
hazing. 

Hazing serves no positive pur- 
pose within a fraternity. It is not a sign 
of unity or brotherhood. Nor is it a 
sign of manhood. It is instead repre- 
sentative of a baser immaturity that 
totally fails to meet the objectives to 
which most fraternities profess. 
Whenever I encounter a group that 
hazes, there are three questions I al- 
ways ask of the chapter. "Who do you 
want to join your fraternity as a new 
brother?" Do you want the boy who 
has so great a need to belong and so 
little self respect that he will submit to 



Intramural update: Alpha Phi Alpha captures title 



any indignity, to any humiliation, in 
order to curry favor with those hazing 
him? Or do you want the man who 
knows who he is, what he stands for, 
and has the self respect to stand up 
and refuse to subject himself to the 
humiliation that is served up under 
the name of brotherhood?" I know 
whom I would choose and so does 
anyone else. 

Unfortunately, the group or 
groups on this campus who haze Will 
not accept any criticism. They will be 
defensive and angry that anyone 
would criticize what they see as 
strictly an internal affair. It is not an 
internal affair. As a member of a 
Greek organization on this campus, 
they are a part of what, in a sense, is a 
greater brotherhood. Their behavior 
reflects on other Greek organizations 
on this campus and at other colleges 
and universities. I agree with Darden 
when she says that the IFC should 
take a stand. If it will not, or cannot, 
because its members ignore the prob- 
lem, then it remains to the University 
to take strong action. This is a situ- 
ation, I promise you, that neither the 
IFC nor the hazing groups would like 
to see happen. 

In the Greek world we have 
outgrown hazing. It cheapens us all. 
Let us end it on this campus once and 
for all. 

Robert Breckenridge, Ph.D. 
Professor of Psychology 
Faculty Adviser and Deputy 
Regional Counselor 
Theta Chi Fraternity 



Contributed by 
Intramural Department 

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity 
showed their true championship col- 
ors as they fought their way to an 
undefeated intramural flag football 
season, going 9-0 to capture the All- 
campus title. 

It was not easy. Finishing the 
Greek League with a 6-0 record, chal- 
lenged only by KA and TKE during 
the regular season, the Alphas faced a 
determined group of TKE men in the 
Greek championship game. 

TKE was fresh from a 13-12 
playoff victory over KA — a game in 
which TKE scored 13 unanswered 
second half points and three intercep- 
tions to win. In the Greek League 
championship. Alpha Phi Alpha 
scored a late game touchdown to in- 
sure a 1 2-0 victory over TKE. The vic- 
tory by Alpha Phi Alpha left them as 
the only unbeaten team to participate 
in the All-campus football playoffs. 

Bossier Hall, primarily a fresh- 
man dorm, capped a 5-1 season with a 



25-19 overtime win over the Nature 
Boys to take the dorm title. Bossier 
was led by Michael Thornton and 
Dewey Granger. The only loss in- 
curred by Bossier was a 21-20 loss to 
the Eastee Boys of Rapides. 

The Open League ended in a 
three-way tie between The Untouch- 
ables, K A#2 and the East All Stars. In 
a tie breaker, East All Stars beat KA#2, 
20-O, for the right to play in the All- 
campus title game. The Untouchables 
were led by Tom my Nassif and Russel 
Seeser. 

Starting with 34 flag football 
teams, only two teams were able to vie 
for the All-Campus Championship. 
After being beaten twice by Alpha Phi 
Alpha, once in regular season play 
and again in a closer game than the 1 2- 
score indicates, the TKE's were 
ready for the final game. 

With 35 seconds left in the first 
half, TKE quarterback Phil Vaughn, 
threwa strike to wideout John Miquez 
for six points and another toss to 
StevieJJmith for the point conversion 



to take a 7-0 halftime lead. In a game 
that was well played and well offici- 
ated, Alpha Phi Alpha stormed out in 
the second half to score six points with 
12:45 left in the game. The goal was 
made by a Jerome Sampson to Todd 
Sterling pass in the left corner of the 
end zone. The point after was no 
good. 

The Alpha defense held TKE 
on their own one yard line with six 
minutes left, taking over and having 
to punt after gaining only one first 
down. After some spirited play, the 
clock showed 55 seconds remaining 
and the TKE's ahead 7-6 with Alpha 
Phi Alpha's ball on the TKE's 20 yard 
line. In the last 55 seconds Alpha Phi 
Alpha scored on a 20-yard Sampson 
to Sterling pass over the outstretched 
hands of the TKE secondary. The 
conversion failed. 

TKE, desperately trying to tie 
the game, threw their first pass deep 
for an Alpha interception. The Alphas 
made a touchdown in the next play. 



play from Todd Sterling with 15 sec- 
onds remaining. The conversion i< 
good for a 19-7 score. 

TKE's first plav om scrim- 
mage was an interception and touch- 
down runback With the game over, 
Alpha Phi A ' v >ha was the All-Campus 
Champions. 

I allowing the game, TKE said, 
" ' ept for the last 55 seconds, it was 
a great game." 

Alpha Phi Alpha said, " It ain't 
over 'til it's over." 



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Alvin Graber scored on a reverse pass 

When the bell tolls. . . No one knows 

Ihe now-defunct committee be disengaged only during concerts, 



By MICHELLE WEEGO 
Staff Writer 

It is 955 a.m. as Northwestern 
students make their way to class sur- 
rounded by the melodious sounds of 
chimes that waft across campus. . . or 
maybe they just hear silence. 

Basically it all depends on 
whether or not freshmen Thomas 
Bradley and Nick Spann have been up 
to the third floor of the A.A. Freder- 
icks Creative and Performing Arts 
Center to program the $15,000 carillon 
chime system. 

A carillon chime system is a set 
of stationary bells hung in a tower and 
sounded either manually, by pedals 
or by machinery. The Northwestern 
system is mechanical. 

A "Memorandum of Under- 
standing," dated July 22, 1982, was 
signed and approved by former 
Northwestern President Joseph Orze 
concerning the Maas-Rowe model 734 
T6 GT-II Cartridge Carillon. The sys- 
tem was installed on campus during 
the spring of 1983. 

The memorandum quotes: 
"The system is to enhance the campus 
environment at Northwestern. It may 
also serve as an informational device 
concerning campus events and sched- 
ules. In general, its purpose is to re- 
vive a tradition that had been dor- 
mant for more than a decade." 

According to the memoran- 
dum, a committee was formed to 
serve as trustee. The committee con- 
sisted of the president, the dean of 
students, director of the School for 
Creative and Performing Arts, direc- 
tor of Student Activities, president of 
the Student Government Association, 
the Music Department head, two stu- 
dents appointed by the SGA and the 
SAB and one member appointed by 
the Chamber of Commerce. 

It was moved and accepted 
unanimously that the chimes be 
named as the Northwestern State 
University Centennial Chimes and a 
plaque reading: "The Maas-Rowe 
Chimes are given by the SGA, Student 
Affairs, Music Department, NSU 
Foundation, and the Natchitoches 
Service League for the NSU Centen- 
nial-1984" was mounted on campus. 
The whereabouts of the plaque is 
presently unkown. 



was to administer the use of the sys- 
tem and supervise its expansion, 
maintenance and repair. A fund to 
support the chime system was to be 
established through the NSU Founda- 
tion. 

Where did this committee go 
and who is now in charge of the sys- 
tem? The only existing evidence of 
such a commission can be found in the 
1982-83 minutes of the original 
committee meeting. The minutes 
were tucked into the bottom drawer 
of a filing cabinet in the Music Depart- 
ment. At this time no ties joining the 
bell committee to anyone on campus 
can be found. Older members have 
retired while others have moved or 
been replaced. The new administra- 
tion knows nothing about the 180- 
watt system located atop the A.A. 
Fredericks Creative and Performing 
Arts Center. 

The chimes lay dormant for a 
period of time before Bradley and 
Spann decided to lend a hand. After 
repairing a grandfather clock located 
in Russell Hall, they were asked by 
music teacher/ secretary Shirley Jen- 
nings to work on the carillon system. 

What they found on investiga- 
tion was an expensive system playing 
the wrong type of tape for its model. 

"It normally runs a Maas- 
Rowe cartridge that the company 
makes but we found it running an 
eight-track tape of 70s rock-n-roll. The 
chimes were also set to ring only once 
a day," Bradley said. After searching, 
the couple found the original tapes in 
a nearby cabinet. 

Meanwhile, Bradley and 
Spann repaired, adjusted, cleaned 
and then reprogrammed the carillon 
system. The chiming schedule was 
reset to play music from a general 
cartridge at five minutes until the 
hour from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Dur- 
ing Homecoming and Parent's Day, 
the carillon was set to play patriotic 
tunes, the Alma Mater and the NSU 
Fight Song. Bradley plans to program 
Christmas music for the month of 
December. 

However, two weeks ago the 
chimes stopped once again. A march- 
ing festival in Turpin Stadium on Oct. 
20 fell under the original committee 
clause that stated, "The system may 



dramatic presentations, assemblies or 
recording sessons where external 
sound interference is deemed unwise 
or disruptive." 

However, the chimes were 
never turned back on after the concert. 
Bradley in search of an answer found 
only a series of "I don't knows." 
"We went to go get the key only to find 
that whoever turned off the system 
two weeks ago never returned it. I can 
fix it easily. It's as simple as flipping a 
switch, but I can't get in there to do it," 
Bradley said. 

The automatic bell ringing 
system is designed to provide the tra- 
ditional bell rings for a university 
including the Westminster Melody 
and hour strike and carillon concerts. 
The bell rings are created within the 
system through the striking of mini- 
ature metal bells and is not created 
electronically. 

The music played before the 
actual chimes are from cartridges that 
may be ordered from the company 
and include a variety of music from 
Broadway to classical. The system 
also includes a power failure inter- 
lock. When asked if Northwestern 
should revive the chimes committee, 
Bradley replied, "They need someone 
to regulate it. A combination of stu- 
dents and faculty would work." 

Several students on campus 
still have a positive attitude about the 
chimes. "I like them," junior Melissa 
Harkins said. "It makes NSU feel 
homey and quaint and adds to the 
overall atmosphere." 

Others believe there is room 
for improvement. 

"I like them but they should 
play something more appropriate for 
college," freshman Jennifer Walsh 
said. Walsh said she has heard "Pop 
Goes the Weasel" and something re- 
sembling the theme from "The Brady 
Bunch" playing on the carillon. 

With this last statement in 
mind, Bradley believes that one day 
students may be able to request cer- 
tain music to be played on the chimes. 
The Maas-Rowe company can take 
sheet music and turn it into a cartridge 
tape for the system. 

In the meantime, the campus 
waits silently for the bells to ring 
again. 




November 3, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 6 



CAMPUS LINE 



Chorale Concert 

Northwestern's Department 
of Music and Theatre Arts will present 
the Natchitoches-Northwestern State 
University Chorale, the Northwest- 
ern Chamber Choir and the Louisiana 
School for Math, Science and the Arts 
Chorale in concert Thursday at 8 p.m. 
in the Recital Hall of the A.A. Fre- 
dricks Creative and Performing Arts 
Center. 

The event is being sponsored 
by the Northwestern Department of 
Music and Theatre Arts. The public 
will be admitted without charge. Dr. 
Burt Allen will conduct the perform- 
ance. 

For more information on the 
chorale concert Thursday night, call 
Northwestern Department of Music 
and Theatre Arts at 357-4522. 



Circle K 

Circle K will meet 5:30 p.m. 
Thursday in room 240 of the Student 
Union. Circle K is a service organiza- 
tion. 

The organization was recently 
established at Northwestern. Circle K 
is an organization designed to meet 
the personal needs of the individual 
collegian through the qualities of 
leadership, the rewards of service and 
the unique spirit of friendship. 

All students are encouraged to 
join Circle K. For more information 
call 352-6643. 



Faculty Concert 

Northwestern music faculty 
members Tony C. Smith, oboist, and 
Dr. Robert Watson, pianist, will be 
featured in a recital performance 
Monday, Nov. 9 at 8 p.m. in the Recital 
Hall of Northwestern's A.A. Freder- 
icks Creative and Performing Arts 
Center. Northwestern's Department 
of Music and Theatre Arts is sponsor- 
ing the faculty recital, which is open to 
the public without admission charge. 
For further information on the faculty 
recital, call the Northwestern Depart- 
ment of Music and Theatre Arts at 
357-4522. 

Exchange Program 

A three-day conference will be 
conducted Nov. 17-19 on opportuni- 
ties to study abroad and student and 
faculty exchange programs with edu- 
cational institutions in other coun- 
tries. The Northwestern Abroad Con- 
ference will feature addresses by rep- 
resentatives from colleges and uni- 
versities all over the world. 

Dr. Grady Harper of the 
Northwestern Art Department is 
serving as coordinator of the confer- 
ence. Invited guests are to include 
local and regional elected officials, the 
NSU faculty and staff, school superin- 
tendents and principals, the news 
media and several local organiza- 
tions. 

GRE workshop 

Northwestern's Nursing Edu- 
cation Center is offering a series of 
workshops to prepare students for the 
Graduate Record Exam (GRE). Con- 
ducted by the Continuing Education 
Program, the workshops will be held 
in Shreveport, 1800 Line Ave. 

Robert Folden, media coordina- 
tor for the Nursing Education Center, 
will be the instructor for the series. 

'Test Taking Strategies/Stresss 
Reduction Techniques" is being of- 
fered on Nov. 3, Jan. 5, March 1 and 
May 3, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the 
Nursing Education Center. 

'Test Preparation/Computer 
Simulation" is being offered Nov. 5, 
Jan. 7, March 3 and May 5 from 5:30 to 
7:30 p.m. also at the Shreveport Nurs- 
ing Campus. 

For fees and additional informa- 
tion on the special series of work- 
shops, call (318) 677-3141 or write Dr. 
Pauline Johnson, Coordinator of 
Nursing Continuing Education, 
Northwestern State University Nurs- 
ing Education Center, 1800 Line 
Avenue, Shreveport, La., 71101. 

SAB positions 

The Student Activities Board 
(SAB) announces the opening of two 
positions. The positions are a repre- 
sentative-at-large position and a Fine 
Arts committee chairman. Students 
interested in applying for the posi- 
tions should contact a SAB program 
adviser at 357-651 1 or go by room 21 4 
of the Student Union. 



BACCHUS 

BACCHUS (Boost Alcohol 
Consciousness Concerning the 
Health of University Students) will 
meet 1 1 :30 a.m . Thursday in room 316 
of the Student Union. The group will 
make plans for December activities. 
Anyone interested in attending or 
obtaining more information about 
BACCHUS should go to the BAC- 
CHUS Office on the third floor of the 
Student Union.- - 



State Fair Week 

Student Government Associa- 
tion Vice President Dave DeCuir 
would like to inform the student 
body on how well State Fair 
activities went. DeCuir would also 
like everyone to pay close attention 
to the changes the SGA is making. 

This year for the first time the 
Student Activities Board and the SGA 
worked togetheronStateFair encoun- 
tering little or no problems. DeCuir 
said the State Fair brunch between 
Tech and Northwestern was a tre- 
mendous success and was packed 
with students. DeCuir said the deco- 
rations were also beautifully done. 

The traditional SGA flag foot- 
ball game played between Tech and 
Northwestern was won by 
Northwestern's SGA. The State Fair 
sweatshirt sale was the best in the 
history of Northwestern with more 
than 400 shirts being sold. 



Term paper tactics 

The Watson Library reference 
staff is offering a free term paper tac- 
tics workshop from 7 to 8 p.m. 
Wednesday in room 215 A on second 
floor of Watson Library. A second 
workshop will be offered from 11 a.m. 
to noon Thursday in room 215 A. 

The workshop will consist of 
developing a plan of attack for con- 
ducting library research and tips on 
narrowing or broadening subjects to 
best use library resources. 

No advanced registration is 
necessary. For more information con- 
tact Thurlow Mayeaux or Abbie Lan- 
dry, reference division, 357-4574. 



Orchestra 

The Natchitoches-Northwest- 
ern State University Symphony Or- 
chestra, conducted by Dr. William 
Davis, will be presented in concert 
Sunday, Nov. 15, at 8 p.m. in the Re- 
cital Hall of Northwestern's A.A. 
Fredericks Creative and Performing 
Arts Center. 

General Admission tickets are 
$5 each. Full-time students at North- 
western and the Louisiana School for 
Math, Science and the Arts will be 
admitted without admission charge. 

the concert is being dedicated 
to the memory of James Swett, who 
died Sept. 19 after serving 14 years as 
an assistant professor of music at 
Northwestern. 

For more information on the 
performance by the Natchitoches - 
Northwestern Symphony Orchestra, 
call the Northwestern Department of 
Music and Theatre Arts at 357-4522. 

Harrington 

Louisiana artist, Chestee Har- 
rington , will have an extensive collec- 
tion of her work featured in an 
"Artist's Corner" exhibit Nov. 6-20 at 
the Cammie G. Henry Research Cen- 
ter in Northwestern's Watson Memo- 
rial Library. The exhibit may be 
viewed Monday through Friday from 
8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. 

A reception honoring Harring- 
ton will be held Friday from 1- 4 p.m. 
in the library research center on the 
third floor of Watson Memorial Li- 
brary. For more information on 
Harrington's exhibit, call the Cammie 
G. Henry Library Research Center at 
357-4585. 



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Majors meeting 

A meeting for all secondary 
education majors will be held 11 a.m. 
Thursday, Nov. 12 in the Teacher 
Education Center auditorium. The 
meeting is mandatory for all secon- 
dary education majors except those in 
physical education and home eco- 
nomics. 



TAKE THE 

Steak Fajita 

BITE & SWITCH 

Challenge 

One bit of steak in our Steak Fajita and you'll switch 
from ordinary fast food. Or the next bite's on us. Guaranteed. 
If you don't like our Steak Fajita, return It. We'll give you 
a simple questionalre. If you fill out the pre-stamped and 
addressed questionnaire and mail it to us, within two weeks 
of receipt Taco Bill will send you a coupon worth up to $2.00 
off your next purchase at any participating Taco Bell restaurant. 
So try a Steak Fajita. You can't lose. 




TACO 'BELL 

Located on the Strip in Natchitoches 

NSU students get 10% discount with student I.D. 
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••a* 



« 
« 
« 
» 



it 















VOL. 


76 NC 


) 1 


6 






r E UNIVERSITY 0? LOUISIANA 



NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 71497 



Food service delivers . . . Itza Pizza 



By GREG KENDRICK 
Editor 

Come Nov. 30th, Northwest- 
ern students will no longer have to 
drive across town to satisfy a desire 
for a slice of Italy. In fact, a hot pizza 
tvith their name on it may be no fur- 
ther than the Student Union parking 
lot, since ARA Food Service began 
construction on a pizza parlor in 
Union Station. 

Kevin OLeary, ARA Food 
Service director for Northwestern, 
said ARA is bringing in their 'Itza 
Pizza" franchise to cater to North- 
western students. 

OLeary said Itza Pizza will 
serve 12-inch and 16-inch pizzas 
along with soft drinks and beer. "We 
are still uncertain on the price list- 
ings," O'Leary said. "We are consult- 
ing three or four other university out- 
lets to compare. 

"We will also be selling pizza 



by the slice. We have eight slices to a 
16-inch pizza. We usually sell a slice 
for $1.25." 

O'Leary said the pizza fran- 
chise will offer many services to the 
students of Northwestern. "We will 
deliver to the dormitories free of 
charge," O'Leary said, "We are pur- 
chasing a golf cart to deliver the piz- 
zas." 

Students with variable A and B 
meal tickets will be able to use their 
meal tickets to purchase pizza and 
plans are in the making for students 
who do not have declining balance 
meal tickets (seven-day and five-day 
meal plans) to buy a surplus account 
at the beginning of the year that may 
be used to buy pizza. 

The pizza parlor will also give 
away pizza parties, T-shirts and a 10- 
speed bicycle in order to promote the 
new franchise. 

OLeary said ARA is spending 



between $35,000 to 540,000 in renova- 
tions and equipment for the pizza 
parlor. 

"We are ordering two pizza 
ovens, which have the capability of 
cooking 1 8 pizzas in an hour each, we 
are putting in a jukebox and six or 
seven video games and we eventually 
plan to have some pool tables as soon 
as the SAB moves out." 

Other expenditures include 
prep tables, counter displays, interior 
painting and trap boxes. 

OLeary said pizza parlors are 
now a common sight on college cam- 
puses. "ARA has contracts on over 
250 college campuses and over 100 of 
these campuses have pizza parlors," 
OLeary said. 

One complication that remains 
to be settled between Northwestern 
administration and ARA is the serv- 
ing of beer in the pizza parlor. 

"We have to make sure that the 



administration and ARA are in agree- 
ment with the contract before we can 
purchase our beer license," OLeary 
said, "I am positive we will have a 
beer license by the time the students 
come back for spring semester." 

"We still have to be careful 
with our alcohal policy. We have to be 
able to tell when a student has had too 
much to drink or if an event is getting 
out of hand," OLeary said. "In lots of 
ways, I feel it is better for the students 
to stay on campus to drink rather than 
having them drink and drive." 

O'Leary said tentative hours 
for Itza Pizza will be from 1 1 a.m. to 10 
p.m. on weekdays and 10 a.m. to 11 
p.m. on weekends and will remain 
open all days of the week. 

"We are focusing on a concept 
that offers both a restaurant environ- 
ment and a delivery service for the 
students of Northwestern," OLeary 
said. 



Student dies in accident 



NSU students study Thanksgiving bird 



By jimmie Mccormick 

Contributor 

, Although many students' 
thoughts rum to turkey as Thanksgiv- 

* ing nears, some Northwestern stu- 

, dents have been thinking about tur- 
key for more than a year. 

Researchers with Northwest- 

> ern State University and Red Dirt 
National Wildlife Management Pre- 
serve began observations on the wild 
turkey population in Kisatchie Na- 
tional Forest more than a year ago. 

Dr. Arthur Allen, professor of 
biology at Northwestern, said, "The 
research requires a complex system of 
trapping and tagging with leg tags 
plus high-colored streamers to obtain 
specific data on each bird in the home 
range, or scientifically accomplished 
by tele-monitoring movements of 
birds and nesting hens." 



Research methods include 
filming videocamera recordings of 
turkeys from blinds and operating a 
mandatory check station during the 
spring turkey hunt on the Red Dirt 
National Wildlife Management Area. 

Allen said the research is criti- 
cal to the future managament and 
conservation of the wild turkey. 

The purpose of the study, ac- 
cording to Allen, is to identify which 
food resources wild turkeys prefer. 
The study is being made on two types 
of food plots — managed and unman- 
aged. Managed plots are planted with 
American joint vetch, winter wheat, 
red clover and subterranean clover. 
The unmanaged plots are areas not 
planted by man and are the control 
aspect of the study. 

The primary objectives, Allen 
said, are to measure the selection 



impact of introduced foods com- 
monly recommended by game man- 
agers versus food native to turkey 
habitat. 

The study has resulted in a 
preliminary estimate of the wild tur- 
key population at Red Dirt Reserve, 
which is more than 37,000 acres. The 
preliminary count, the first ever calcu- 
lated from research at Red Dirt, is set 
at' about 300 turkeys. 

Allen said devastating delays 
on the observations have resulted 
from increased poaching in the area. 
For each bird under observation that 
disappears, a delay as much as two 
months takes place. 

The Louisiana Department of 
Wildlife and Fisheries has taken 
measures to protect the turkeys and 
promotes Operation Game Thief, 



mation leading to the arrest and con- 
viction of poachers. The program 
protects informants by keeping infor- 
mation tips anonymous. 

Working with Allen on the 
project are Angela Johnson, master's 
zoology student, and several under- 
graduate assistants including Dave 
Merrell, majoring in plant and soil 
science, Kevin Fontenot, majoring in 
wildlife, and Mark Oberle, microbiol- 
ogy- 
Johnson's master's thesis in- 
volves establishing the home range of 
monitored turkey flocks on the Red 
Dirt Reserve. Johnson monitors about 
50 birds in her study. 

The Kisatchie Chapter of the 
National Wild Turkey Federation is 
supporting the research through 
funds and personal assistance. 




Teresa Cazales 



Teresa "Terri" Cazalas, 18 of 
LaPLace, died at about 11:30 a.m. Fri- 
day after suffering injuries in an auto- 
mobile accident. 

Cazalas, a freshman in the 
Scholars' College, was pronounced 
dead at the scene when the car she was 
driving struck a tree on Tauzin Island 
Road. According to Natchitoches 
Sheriff sdeputies, Cazalas wastravel- 
i ng west on Parish Road 429 when she 
apparently lost control of the vehicle 
and struck a tree. 

Injured in the crash was Albert 
Lertz of Slidcll, also a freshman in 
Scholars' College, Lenz was taken to 
Natchitoches Parish Hospital where 
he was treated and released. 



which offers a $1,300 reward for infor 

Dormitory temperatures prove tricky for residents in uncontrollable Louisiana weather 

By LISA DARDEN 
Managing Editor 

Some like it hot; some like it 



Cazalas had attended the Lou- 
isiana School for Match, Sciences and 
the Arts for two years where she was 
active in Mu Alpha Thcta, JuniorClas- 
skal League, Medical Explorers, 
tiortal Honor Society and the Louisi 
ana School Christian Organization, j 

Funeral services for Cazalas 
were held Monday in LaPlaceJ 
Scholar's College students and mcm-| 
bers of Northwestern and Scholars'] 
College administration attended the 
services, 

Cazalas' death brought to 1 4 the 
number of accidental motor vehicle 
fatalities in Natchitoches Parish since 
Jan. i, j 



cold. 

Maintaining a comfortable tem- 
perature for residents of the five dor- 
mitories on North western's campus is 
no easy task and Louisiana's con- 
stantly changing weather doesn't 
make it any easier. 

Last week students experienced 
warm days at the first of the week. By 
the middle of the week temperatures 
dropped causing adjustments to dor- 
mitory thermostats a necessity. 

Although outside temperatures 
can drop overnight, adjusting tem- 
peratures in the dorms can take sev- 
eral days. 

According to Kirk Tyree, plant 



engineer, changing from cooling to 
heating can take at least one day for 
some of the dorms. 

All of Northwestern' s dormito- 
ries, along with other buildings on 
campus, are heated by a steam sys- 
tem. To heat buildings, steam gener- 
ated from the main boiler located in 
the Power Plant is piped to the build- 
ings on campus and generated 
through a centrally-located fan. To 
cool buildings, cold water is piped 
through the system. 

Tyree said Northwestern has 
two types of pipe systems for heating 
and cooling its buildings — a two-pipe 
and four-pipe system. The two-pipe 
system consists of a supply pipe 
which carries steam to the building 
and a return pipe which carries used 



steam back to the plant. The two-pipe 
system allows for only one tempera- 
ture of water to be transported to and 
from the building. 

A four-pipe system, however, 
consists of two supply pipes and two 
return pipes. This system allows both 
steam and cold water to be pumped to 
the buildings simultaneously. The 
change from a cooling to heating proc- 
ess can be felt in a number of hours. 

Tyree said Rapides and 
Boozman halls are on a two-pipe sys- 
tem and Natchitoches, Sabine and 
Bossier are on a four-pipe system. The 
changeover for Rapides and Boozman 
can take up to a day, whereas the other 
dorms can be changed in a matter of 
hours, Tyree said. 



"The pipes are metal. We have 
to graduate from cold water to steam 
slowly in order to prevent broken 
pipes," Tyree said of the two-pipe 
system. 



In addition to waiting for the 
pipes to warm up, the process of 
changing from cooling to heating can 
be further delayed due to channels of 
communication. Although tempera- 
tures are monitored by computer in 
the Utilities Operation office, Tyree 
must await official word from the 
Housing Department before making a 
changeover from cooling to heating. 
The Housing Department awaits 
word from the house directors. Wait- 
ing for word to go through the proper 
channels of communication can take 



up to a day in itself. 

Tyree said maintaing tempera- 
tures in the dormitories has been 
made more difficult due to the current 
steam rehabilitation construction on 
campus. 

Constructors are installing a 
rehabilitation system which will 
transport used steam back to the 
power plant to be treated, reheated 
and used again. The new system, 
which is expected to be complete by 
the end of the year, will save North- 
western money in chemicals and 
power. 

'The construction is causing 
some problems," Tyree said. 
"Everytime the contractor does one 
thing we have to do two things to get 



the system back in order." 

Tyree said they had found three 
"good-sized leaks" on campus which 
had to be repaired. 



Tyree said leaks cannot be 
found until steam is run through the 
pipes. Once steam is circulating in the 
pipes, leaks are easier to find . Steam at 
330 degrees Fahrenheit is pumped 
through the pipes at 100 pounds of 
pressure per hour. If a leak develops 
in the system, steam forces its way out 
and is easy to see. 

Although Tyree and his crew 
must worry with several factors in 
order to maintain a comfortable envi- 
ronment, dorm residents are con- 
cerned only with the temperature. For 
now residents, rest easy: "the heat is 



Students Assisting Students organization fights discrimination against the handicapped 



By BERTHA MAXIE 
Staff Writer 

In an open-minded, liberal 
society, it is easy to forget that some 
members are discriminated against 
due to such characteristics as color, 
gender, disability or limitations. 

Through crusades, marches 
and movements, the American soci- 
^ has made incredible leaps toward 
a world that offers equal rights and 
opportunities to all. It is even in- 
cluded in the Constitution, promising 
llf e, liberty and the pursuit of happi- 



ness. 

Society has a long way to go 
before it becomes perfect. To some, 
the pursuit of happiness includes 
pursuit of education. However, some 
students face physical barriers daily 
in their pursuit. 

For students at Northwestern 
facing such physical obstacles, a 
fledgling interest group, Students 
Assisting Students (SAS), has been 
created. SAS was founded during the 
1 987 spring semester as a class project 
by Northwestern student Ginger In- 



gram. 

Although SAS is still in its in- 
fantile stages, the group has high 
hopes and has set long-range plans. 
Membership of the group stands at six 
with all members possessing some 
form of physical impairment. The 
group operates out of the Academic 
Support Services office and is under 
the supervision of Dr. Mary Dillard, 
Director of College Success. 

"We're not .going to perform 
miracles or solve everything but we 
hope it will help," said Ingram, who is 




legally blind. 

Ingram and members of SAS 
are laying the groundwork for a more 
organized voice for handicapped stu- 
dents in the future. The group has 
many proposals and ideas for im- 
provement of Northwestern as a 
equal opportunity institution acces- 
sible for all. 

Section 504 of the Rehabilita- 
tion Act of 1973 names provisions 
which postsecondary schools must 
follow to ensure equality for qualified 
disabled enrolled students. A 



postsecondary school — vocational 
school, community college, or univer- 
sity — must offer equal access to pro- 
grams, services and activities to all 
enrolled students. 

According to Ingram, SAS was 
established in hopes that an organ- 
ized group of students could make 
administrators more aware of stu- 
dents with special needs. Although 
the group makes suggestions to the 
administration, most improvements 
made on campus are direct results of 



Currently, Ingram said, im- 
provements on campus are made 
because of individual demands. In- 
gram cited recent improvements such 
as the wheelchair ramp installed in 
Sabine Hall. 

Buildings are made accessible 
to handicapped students when ad- 
ministrators become aware that 
handicapped students will be living 

see Handicapped 
on page 5 



individuals voicing their needs. 

Northwestern Police plans to patrol horseback 

NEWS BUREAU-The Univer- large crowds to the university, 
sity Police Department is taking a Mr. Only specially trained officers 

Ed approach to stopping crime. The will be assigned to mounted patrol. 

The horseback officer is becoming 
very popular amoung university po- 
lice, Ficklin said. The use of mounted 
police is already in practice at several 
universities throughout the nation. 

According to Ficklin, officers on 
horseback "have much better vision 
of their surroundings than those in 
patrol cars and are able to move rap- 
idly to wooded areas and other parts 
of campus that are not accessible to 
vehicles." 

Horses to be used in the 



Department is in the process of final 
izing plans for a mounted patrol on 
Northwestern's 1,000-acre main cam- 
pus. 

The purpose of the mounted 
patrol is to enhance safety and reduce 
vandalism on campus, Police Chief 
Crawford Ficklin said. 

Officers for the special force 
will begin patrolling in the spring 
1988 semester. The horseback force 
will patrol during the evening hours 
and at special events which attract 



mounted patrol have been donated to 
the university by the equine science 
program. 

University Police are soliciting 
donations from Northwestern alumni 
and other friends of the university for 
use in the mounted patrol. 

Chief Ficklin said, "Our prefer- 
ence for donations is 16-hand quarter- 
horses, but others will be accepted if it 
is determined that they can be trained 
for mounted patrol use." 

Anyone interested in providing 
horses for Northwestern's mounted 
patrol should contact Chief Ficklin at 
357-5431. 



Good luck, Demons! 



Page 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 




November 17, 1987 |\|ov 



NEWS 



Union Station relocation upsets SAB 

' ^ KCVir ftCrtL/KIV*** hilt WaR Tint nlpa<«i with thp fart that "Mr»cf all nf tViic ronm^f^n ^ A CADC,.« mAv r A .. HA : 



Editor 

With the arrival of an on-cam- 
pus pizza parlor, furnished by ARA 
Food Service, comes complaints from 
members of the Student Activities 
Board (SAB) who are now having to 
relocate Union Station into the old 
Student Union bowling alley. 

Marjorie Poss, SAB program 
adviser, said many SAB members 
were not pleased that North western's 
administration did not inform them of 
the decision to place the pizza parlor 
in the present location of Union Sta- 
tion. Poss said the administration in- 
stigated the pizza parlor plans with- 
out consent from the SAB. 

"Student assessment fees pay 
for this building and the maintenence 
that goes with it," Poss said. "The 
students are supposed to have a voice 
in everything that happens in this 
building." 

Rachel Heider, SAB public re- 
lations officer, said she welcomes the 
new addition to the Student Union 



but was not pleased with the fact that 
SAB was not informed about the 
building changes. 

"I'm excited they are putting 
something down there; however, I am 
very disappointed that the admini- 
stration (NSU) did not look into their 
contract and realize the SAB has con- 
trol over the entire Student Union, 
which means the students have con- 
trol over the Student Union," Heider 
said. 

Kim Antee, SAB president, 
said that although plans for the pizza 
parlor were set in the 1987 summer 
session, SAB was not informed the fall 
semester. 

"I was told at the beginning of 
the fall semester, but the administra- 
tion had already signed the contract 
with ARA." 

Kevin CLeary, ARA Food 
Service director at Northwestern, said 
the food service edition in Union Sta- 
tion is part of a renovation agreement 
stated in the contract between North- 
western and ARA. 



'Most all of this renovation 
was agreed through contract," 
CLeary said. "We have agreed to put 
$200,000 worth of renovation and or 
additions into the facilities of North- 
western." 

O'Leary said ARA and the SAB 
have reached a tentative agreement 
allowing all SAB sanctioned events to 
be held in the pizza parlor until the 
bowling alley next door is renovated. 

Heider and Antee both 
stressed that their arguement is not 
with ARA Food Service. 

Heider said,"I feel that the 
pizza parlor will be excellent for the 
Student Union. ARA is very coopera- 
tive and they want to work with us, 
but it appears that the administration 
does not want to work with us." 

SomeSAB members are stating 
the administration had the opportu- 
nity to consult the Board as early as 
last summer session when ARA 
signed the contract with the admini- 
stration. 

Jimmie McCormick, head of 



Loans help students through hard times 

By MICHELE BROOMFIELD ' c.,,^ caiH c *,„w c ^„SzL r„^„ *..*L*. 



the SAB Summer Council for the 1987 
summer session, said he was not told 
of the project until after the move had 
already been planned. 

"I understand they had to 
make changes fast, but I wish the stu- 
dents would have been consulted," 
McCormick said. 

Carl Henry, director of Organi- 
zations and Activities, said there is 
very little truth in any of the SAB's 
accusations. 

"What we have here is a lack of 
communication," Henry said. "We 
have informed the SAB many times 
prior to the beginning of renovations. 

"The change in the Student 
Union is going to be a positive move. 
The SAB are not so much resisting 
administration but change itself. We 
are trying to work as much as possible 
with the SAB, it isn't an 'us' and 'them' 
situation." 

Henry was not a member of 
Northwestern's staff at the time the 
ARA /Northwestern contract was 
signed. 



Guys and Gals 

Tanning Special For 
The Holidays 



10 Sessions 
$25.00 



Nov.l-Jan.l 
$50.00 



Located in the NSU Student Union 
Phone 357-5451 



Staff Writer 

Many college students have 
found scholarships, grants, work 
study and other forms of "free" finan- 
cial aid helpful in achieving the goal of 
a college degree. However, some- 
times this "free" financial aid is not 
enough to pay for a student's college 
career. 

For college students who find 
the costs of college exorbitant despite 
financial help, low-interest federal 
student loans are an additional aid in 
paying for college. 

Unlike scholarships, which are 
credited to a student's account, loans 
are dispersed as checks to the student 
receiving the loan. Money from loans 
must first be used to pay on the 
student's account. Any money left can 
be used by the student for personal 
expenses. 

According to Terry Faust, di- 
rector of Financial Aid, the Financial 
Aid Department works closely with 
the Controller's Office to ensure loan 
money is used to pay a student's ac- 
count at Northwestern. 

Loan checks are issued from 
the Financial Aid Department to stu- 
dents. According to Faust, a student 
cannot owe Northwestern any money 
before leaving the Financial Aid De- 
partment with the check. Students 
who use loan money to pay their ac- 
count are escorted to the Cashier's 
Office by a member of the Financial 
Aid Department with the check. 

"A variety of loans are avail- 
able to help students pay tuition, 
meals and room and board," Faust 
said. 



Faust said students taking an 
expensive major sometimes apply for 
a federal loan. Faust cited aviation 
science majors as an example due to 
flight lessons and insurance a student 
must have in order to major in the 
field. 

Although sometimes neces- 
sary, a student loan should be a last 
resort for funding a college career, 
Faust said. Federal student loans 
must be repaid and can sometimes 
cause future financial hardships for 
the student. 

Northwestern offers five fed- 
eral student loan programs. Faust 
said the Perkins Loan Program, the 
Guaranteed Student Loan Program 
(GSL) and the Nursing Student Loan 
Program, are low-interest need-based 
loans. The loans are awarded to 
undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents who demonstrate financial 
need. 

The Perkins Loan, formerly 
called National Direct Student Loan 
(NDSL), is 90 percent federally 
funded while Northwestern provides 
only 10 percent of the funds. North- 
western does, however, have the re- 
sponsibility of deciding who will re- 
ceive the loans. According to Faust, 
the decision is based on grade point 
average, financial need as reported on 
Federal Student Aid Reports and the 
Northwestern financial aid applica- 
tion. 

Through the Perkins program, 
a student may borrow up to $4,500 for 
the first two years of undergraduate 
study. As a junior or senior, a student 
may borrow up to $9,000 minus the 
amount borrowed as a freshman or 



sophomore. Graduate students are 
eligible to borrow up to $1 8,000 minus 
any money borrowed as an under- 
graduate. 

The interest rate on the Perkins 
Loan is 5 percent but is not charged 
until repayment begins nine months 
after the student leaves school or 
drops below half-time status. 

According to Faust, North- 
western awarded about 250 students 
with $300,000 worth of loans through 
the Perkins program during the 1986- 
87 school year. Faust said many of 
these loans were given along with 
grants and work study. 

Due to enrollment increases, 
Perkins Loans will not be available for 
students in the spring semester. Ac- 
cording to Faust, money available for 
the Perkins Loan was passed out 
during the fall semester. Students in- 
terested in the Perkins Loan will be 
able to apply this spring for the fall 
1988 semester. 

The Nursing Student Loan 
Program is available to students en- 
rolled in an undergraduate nursing 
program. Like the Perkins Loan, eligi- 
bility is based on grades and financial 
need. 

According to Faust, nearly 
$50,000 was awarded to about 45 
nursing students during the 1986-87 
school year through the Nursing Stu- 
dent Loan Program. 

Nursing students can borrow 
up to $2,500 per year with a $10,000 
maximum set on the total loan. The 
interest rate for this loan is 6 percent. 
Repayment is deferred as long as the 
student remains eligible and enrolled 
in school. 




High school 
students are 
greeted at the 
front of Kyser 
Hail during 
Northwestera*s 
Journalism day 
which was held 
last Friday. 




In order to apply for the Perk- 
ins or Nursing Loan programs, stu- 
dents must complete two applica- 
tions — federal financial aid and 
Northwestern financial aid. Students 
indicate in which loan programs they 
are interested by marking the North- 
western application. 

When the Financial Aid De- 
partment receives the Student Aid 
Report, a counselor asseses the need 
of the student and awards the loan. 
Loans are repaid directly to North- 
western. 

The GSL program is the largest 
loan program at Northwestern and 
nationwide. According to Faust, more 
students apply for the GSL because it 
is easily accessible. 

GSL's are funded through a 
bank or other financial institution. 
The loan is approved by a guarantee 
agency which insures the loan will be 
repaid. 

Undergraduate and graduate 
students are eligible for GSL's. Under- 
graduates, however, must have their 
eligibility for a Pell Grant determined 
before they can receive a GSL. 

The interest rate for the GSL is 
currently 8 percent. After July 1988, 
first time borrowers will be charged 8 
percent interest for the first four years 
of repayment and 10 percent for the 
following years. 

Students begin repaying the 
GSL six months after leaving school or 
becoming ineligible. Depending on 

see Loans 
on page 5 



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17, 198? Movember 17, 1987 

=== !ditorial 




CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Mnion changes big deal to SAB 



n.l 
) 

lion 



J 



JSA DARDEN 
managing Editor 

"What's the big deal?" you ask. 
The Student Activities Board 
5AB) is all in a dither because some- 
one has decided to put a pizza place in 
•jnion Station. 

"But it's a good thing," you 

• The SAB is not saying it's a bad 

thing- in ^ act 'hey a g ree tnat i f 's an 
approvement for the students. How- 
, ver/ they're all in a dither because of 
Something else. 

Let's go back in time— back a 
years to when the SAB was 



they wanted? they'd taken over Union Station. Did 

No one's saying we don't want the students have a say in this? 



few 



I ^own as the SUGB (for those of you 
w ho don't recall — that stood for Stu- 
dent Union Governing Board). The 

^UGB's goals were similar to the 

)NER R pH5AB's, only the name changed. 

L jUGB's name, however, revealed an 
Additional purpose, the governing 
jnd running of the Student Union. 

The Student Union is consid- 
ered the hub or living room of the 
a niversity for the students. It should 
" je a place where students can go to 
■elax, eat, be with friends and to catch 
jp on the latest. It should be a place 
where students feel welcome and at 
cast have a voice in what types of 
■ntertainment and facilities are of- 
fered. 

It's good to see that the Student 
Jnion is making steps to improve it- 
self for the students. However, did 
N inyone ask the students if that's what 



A 71457 

S: 352-4923' 
>r 352-4246 



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1 wash, 
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skirt, 

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the pizza. But darnit, it's the principle 
of the matter. 

What is the SAB supposed to do 
if they can't help run the Union? We 
don't want to reduce an active and 
productive organization such as the 
SAB to a mere figurehead of small 
accomplishments. We already have 
one student-elected representative 
group which is struggling. Let's not 
ruin the good one we have. Let the 
SAB do their job. 

SAB members are students who 
opted to take a part in student activi- 
ties and the Student Union because 
they have a sincere interest in the 
quality of student life. They are in the 
group not only to represent the extra- 
curricular side of student life but also 
to gain valuable personal experience 
in such issues as deciding what and 
how to best represent the students. 

First it was the painting of the 
Union. Granted, the purple and or- 
ange on the third floor could drive 
you to the mental ward and the carpet 
in the stairwells was a little musty, but 
now it's as if we're in the mental ward 
or some kind of hospital. Everything 
is sterile white. 

Next it was the three rooms in 
the Union that were renovated and 
modernized. Then mysteriously, one 
day a purple, plastic "Le Ren- 
dezvuos" appeared on the front of the 
Union. Then before you knew it, 



Now don't get me wrong. These 
are all improvements and have added 
something to the appearance of the 
Union. My complaint is that the stu- 
dents who were elected to represent 
us in such matters didn't even get to 
represent us. 

Better yet, the director of the 
Student Activities (or whatever the 
title is now) didn't even speak up on 
behalf of SAB. Instead he came on like 
the warden on "Cool Hand Luke" 
saying "What we have here is a failure 
to communicate." (That's right Mr. 
Warden. Someone is definitely not 
communicating with SAB?) And for 
those of you who recall the movie, at 
the time the warden informed Cool 
Hand Luke of the lack of communica- 
tion, Luke had been knocked to the 
ground and was pinned down. 
I thought this guy (not the warden) 
was supposed to be their adviser. He 
said, "We are trying to work as much 
as possible with the SAB. . ." Well, I 
should hope so, that's part of his job. 

And what about this, "There is 
very little truth in any of the SAB's 
accusations." Is the SAB lying? I 
hardly think so. What an accusation! 

My next thought is "What 
next?" Will the administration se- 
cretly plan and program activities for 
SAB then inform them as the enter- 
tainer pulls into town? Hey, isn't that 
Billy Idol over there? 




More spectator support needed 



The staff of the Current Sauce would like to remind the students of Northwestern and 
Scholars' College to have a safe and thankful holiday. Enjoy the break, but exercise caution 
when traveling to and from Northwestern. 

Take a break from studying and catch up on your sleep in order to confront your finals 
with a clear mind. 



Demons • . . an odd choice for a mascot 



SONY A RiGAUD 
Staff Writer 

Here's a question similar to 
diose that have been asked over a 
:housand times. Why is 
Morth western's mascot a demon? 

I've often wondered about that 
myself. There was an article which 
answered a few of my unanswered 
questions in the 1985 edition of the 
Potpourri-"Cekbrfltton of a Century" . 
The article, which was written by 
lerri D. Griffin, is entitled "How the 
Demon Received its Name." 

The article states that the mas- 
»t was chosen in 1923. So that means 
hat Northwestern fans have been 
Peering for the Demons for 64 years 
now. 

The mascot was chosen when 
'resident Victor L. Roy and Coach 
*L. Prather decided that the North- 
western football team needed a real 
ttme after occasionally being • re- 
ared to as "our faithful warriors" in 
"any newspaper articles. 

President Roy declared a con- 
*st in which students were to submit 
*>eir choices for the mascot by noon 
I October 25, 1923. The choices were 
«amined by President Roy, Dr. Jesse 
hazard, and Mr. John Guardia. This 
oamittee of judges could not decide 
*«veen "Breves" or "Demons." The 
^dents made the final choice, . . . and 



d 



order. 



AM Ri«hl!>R™^3 



p.m. 
irs. 
p.m. 



we all know what that was. 

There were two students who 
submitted this entry. They received a 
cash prize of $10.00. 

Still, there is the question I 
stated before. Why is Northwestern's 
mascot a demon? What attracted the 
students to this odd character? 
Maybe, it is because the Demons 
seemed the most unusual out of all the 
submitted entries. 

Some of the other entries were 
Spartans, Eagles, Barecats, Giants, 
Indians, Cubs, Redskins, Pioneers, 
Daredevils, Serpents and Falcons. 

There were also those names 
that I thought were totally ridiculous. 
Some examples of these follies are 
Emperors, Deers, and Royalists. And 
can you imagine cheering on the 
Northwestern Sharks? I guess, maybe 
in rime, we could get used to it. 

Oh, and the Warriors was also 
an entry. Why wasn't this chosen? 
After all, because of the newspapers, 
some people were already accus- 
tomed to "our faithful warriors". 

Out of all these names and 
more, there are a few that I would 
have tossed out in a jiffy. And, yes, the 
"Demons" would have been one of 
there chosen few. 

Why? 

Well, this decision may have 
been made after I had an interesting 



little conversation with my five year 
old nephew. Let me relate this to you. 
I was wearing a Northwestern T-shirt 
with the Demon mascot on it. 

Tony asked, "Aunt Sonya, why 
do you have the devil on your shirt?" 

I replied, "It's not the devil, it's 
a demon." 

Then he said/'That's the same 
thing." 

This really surprised me so 
much that I didn't know what to say to 
him, so ... I changed the subject. 

And maybe I would have 
thrown it out because of the actual 
meaning of the word. In the Random 
House College Dictionary the 
definition(s) of demon is/are as 
follows: de man n. 1. an evil 

spirit; devil. 2. an evil passion or 
influence. 3. a person considered ex- 
tremely wicked, evil, or cruel. 

Now these definitions are not 
what I think about when I yell, "Fork 
'em, Demons, fork 'em!" And I'm 
almost positive that none of you do 
either, ... at least I hope not. 

However, let's continue on to 
the most important definition, . . . the 
one which I think should best de- 
scribe our dedicated team mascot: 4. a 
person with great energy, drive, etc. 

Even though our mascot may 
look kind of devilish, our Northwest- 
ern guys are demons for winning ... at 
least, that's what they're striving for. 



By DAN MEDLIN 
Staff Writer 

Motivation is what it's all 
about and Northwestern students 
don't seem to be motivated enough to 
attend the Demon football games. 

Saturday's game saw an atten- 
dance of a little more than 8,000. This 
number is not very representative of 
the growing student population that 
Northwestern has seen. Believe it or 
not, crowd size and participation 
make a difference to our varsity athe- 
letes. There is nothing more exciting 
than running out on the football field 
and hearing a roar of 15,000 or more 
fans cheering for you. Our players are 
quite a bit disappointed in us right 
now for not giving them that kind of 
support. 

So far this season, Turpin Sta- 
dium has cradled record setting 
crowds. At earlier games, crowds of 
13,000 and more were recorded. 
Where did those fans go? 

Louisiana Tech has crowds of 
close to 20,000 for most of its games, 
and they are complaining of poor at- 
tendence! If we are to compare our 
university with Tech's on aspects of 



academics and cultural and social 
functions, we must also be able to 
show a more involved student popu- 
lation. 

The most important thought 
should be concentrated on the moti- 
vation of our Demons to win, and 
believe me they are. Ask any one of the 
players and they'll tell you they plan 
on ending this season with a loud 
thunder. They will also tell you they 
need student support in the stands to 
make that happen. 

Possibly, some students have 
lost faith in the Demons' ability to pull 
off the important wins. Well, the 
Demons won this last game and we 
weren't there to see it: our loss and 
theirs. 

Next Saturday in Turpin Sta- 
dium is the last home game the De- 
mons will play in the 1987 season. Our 
varsity athletes, trainers, coaches, 
cheerleaders and Vic the Demon are 
all asking for the biggest and most 
enthusiastic crowd ever. They de- 
serve our support. Let's rally to the 
stands this Saturday. Cheer hard for 
your Demons this game and help 
them end the season with a win. 



Writer wants less visitation hassles 



Dear Editor, 

After traveling two hours to 
pay me a visit, my boyfriend wanted 
nothing more than to sit down, relax, 
and recuperate before driving back 
again. It had been three weeks since 
we had last seen each other and we 
had things to tell each other. When he 
arrived, he walked up to the front 
desk of Sabine and asked the desk 
workers to call me. I came downstairs 
and proceeded to sign him in so he 
could come up to my room to visit. 
However, I was told that because he 
had no NSU ID he was going no- 
where. We did get to talk, but in the 
lobby in front of a row of people who 
were trying to watch television. 

Explain! 

Why is it that Northwestern 
students can be allowed in with noth- 
ing but a quick signature and a drop of 
the ID while someone that does not 
have the distinct pleasure of attending 
NSU has to be cleared by the campus 



Police? Is our school that vain? Are 
our students so precious that no out- 
siders are allowed inside to simply 
pay a visit? 

After returning from a week- 
end at home, the heavy-packer here 
just wanted to get her stuff up in her 
room and relax. Of course my boy- 
friend was stopped again and told in 
so many words to stand and watch me 
take several trips to the third floor 
with my bags. Please tell me what 
these people think he's going to do 
that any Northwestern student isn't. 
Why is it so important he be kept out? 

If a person can provide an 
adequate ID he or she should be al- 
lowed to visit. I am not insinuating 
that everyone should call up their 
friends and announce 'Tarty Time!" I 
simply think there are some decent 
out-of-towners out there. 

Think about it. 

Tammy Harper 



Current Quotes 



Do you feel students are kept in the dark about administrative policy? 






^HamHymes 

j 2 ' Music Education 

^hitoches 

in the past, students weren'\ 
ll^tf. However, now, under iht 
* ^ministration combined with 
A > students are more informed." 



David Lima 

1-2, Elec Engineering 

New Orleans 

"To a certain extent, I believe 
that the student body is kept in the 
dark. Administrative policy is pretty 
straightforward (listed in the student 
handbook), but what sort of process is 
used to arrive at these policies is 
somewhat cloudy." 



Stacy Kay 

1-1, Business Admin. 
Leesville 

" No, because most of theinfor- 
ma Hon a student needs to know can be 
found in the student handbook." 



Kim Dowden 
1-1, Accounting 
Leesville 

"Being my first semester at 
NS U, I feel lam kept up to date on all 
policies." 



Jacqueline Celestine 
1-1, Business Admin. 
Cottonport 

"/ feel that some of the students 
are kept in the dark about certain 
policies but not all of them. They take 
an interest only in the policies that 
mainly concern them." 



CURRENT SAUCE 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 



USA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 



KIRK COPELAND 

Sports Editor 



MICHELE BROOM FIELD 
SARAH BULLER 
WANDA HAMILTON 
RACHEL HEIDER 
BERTHA MAXIE 
DAN MEDLIN 
SONYA RIGAUD 
MICHELLE WEEGO 
Staff Writers 



ALLEN EVANS 

Advertising Manager 



EDD LEE 

Circulation/Distribution 



MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
TEDRIS SMITH 

Photographers 



TOM WHITEHEAD 

Adviser 



The Current Sauce Is 
published weekly during the fall 
and spring semesters by the stu- 
dents of Northwestern State Uni- 
versity of Louisiana . It is not asso- 
ciated with any of the 
University's departments and is 
financed independently. 

The Current Sauce Is 
based in the Office of Student 
Publications located In Kyser 
Hall. The office of the editorial 
staff is 225H. telephone (318) 
357-5466. The adviser's office is 
103 Kyser Hall, telephone 357- 
5213. 

The mailing address for 
the Current Sauce is P.O. Box 
5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 
71497. 

All correspondence, in- 
cluding letters to the editor is 
welcome. Material submitted 
for consideration must be 
mailed to above address or 
brought to the office. 

The deadline for all ad- 
vertising and copy is Friday by 3 
p.m. Inclusion of any and all 
material is left to the discretion of 
the editor. 

Letters to the editor 
should be typed (double- 
spaced) signed, and should In- 
clude a telephone number 
where the writer can be 
reached. No anonymous letters 
will be printed. 

Current sauce subscrip- 
tion rates are S 1 1 per academic 
year (27 Issues) or S6 per 
semester (14 Issues). The paper is 
entered as second-class mail at 
Natchitoches. LA. The USPS 
number is 140-660 



Page 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



November 17, 1987 ^ ov 

" ne 



Demons stun No. 5 Jackson State 



By KIRK COPELAND 
Sports Editor 

Northwestern State couldn't 
buy rushing yardage just two weeks 
ago. Now they have it in surplus. 

The Steamin' Demons, who 
had four consecutive games in which 
they didn't gain over 100 rushing 
yards, piled up 260 yards on the 
ground in upsetting fourth-ranked 
Jackson State 26-24 before 8,100 fans at 
NSU's Turpin Stadium. 

For the second straight week 
tailback John Stephens had a produc- 
tive game, chewing up 86 yards on ten 
carries, bringing him to within 95 
yards of the late Joe Delaney's school 
record of 3,048 career rushing yards. 
Paul Frazier added 76 yards on five 
attempts, including a 47 yard dash in 
the first half setting up NSU's first 
score. 

Jackson State took an early lead 
in the first quarter, driving 57 yards 
with the aid of a roughing the passer 
penalty. Lewis Tillman punched it in 
from two yards out for the first of his 
three touchdowns to give the Tigers 
the 6-0 advantage after a bad snap on 
the conversion. 

The Demons came back with a 
long drive of their own, taking the 
pigskin 90 yards in five plays, includ- 
ing Frazier^s burst. Scott Stoker, who 
alternated on every play with Rusty 
Slack at quarterback for the second 
week in a row, toted the ball in from 
four yards out and, after Keith 
Hodnett's extra point, the Men in 
Purple led 7-6. 



Stoker, the Demons' leading 
passer, went down with a knee injur)' 
later in the game and is expected to be 
out for the remainder of the 1987 sea- 
son. 

Jackson State took advantage 
of a short punt to go back on top later 
in the second quarter. The Tigers 
covered 44 yards in five plays and 
Tillman took it in from 19 yards out. 
Again JSU failed on the conversion 
but led 12-7. 

Once more the Demons drove 
the length of the field following the 
Jackson State kickoff. Stephens trot- 
ted 15 yards for the score, capping the 
93 yard drive which was keyed by a 42 
yard Slack-to- Al Edwards aerial and 
giving NSU a 14-12 halftime lead. 

NSU capitalized on a Tiger 
fumble after its first possession of the 
second half by driving 87 yards to 
paydirt. Punter Mark Contreras fired 
his third pass of the year out of punt 
formation for a 56 yard completion to 
Edwards, keeping the NSU penetra- 
tion alive. Frazier had runs of 16 and 
10 yards on the drive, the latter for the 
freshman's first touchdown of the 
year. Hodnett had to run with a poor 
center snap and was stopped short, 
increasing the Fiery Ones' lead to 20- 
12. 

On its next possession, NSU 
saw Slack join fellow field general 
Stoker on the bench after taking a late 
hit to the hip. Gilbert Galloway took 
up the "Slack" by leading the Demons 
to a 13 yard score which he carried in 
himself. Yet another conversion at- 
tempt, this time a two pointer, was 



foiled, but the NSU gridders still held 
a lofty 26-12 lead going into the last 
period. 

Tillman, who took over the 
Jackson State single season rushing 
lead in the second quarter surpassing 
Walter Payton, ended a 79 yard drive 
by diving in from one yard away for 
his third touchdown. The two point 
attempt failed and the NSU gap was 
closed to 26-18. 

JSU then took advantage of the 
Demons' lone turnover, a fumble by 
Frazier on the NSU 30 yard line. 
Quarterback Shannon Boyd carried it 
in from one yard out, but the conver- 
sion run was stopped short for the 26- 
24 final score. 

"It was a great win," said top 
Demon Sam Goodwin. "They're one 
of the most talented teams we've 
played since I've been here." 

Northwestern State rolled up 
404 total yards against the nation's 
best defense. Jackson State had given 
up just 188.2 yards per contest includ- 
ing a mere 56 yards on the ground. 

"Offensively, we did a great 
job with what we had," Goodwin 
said, "especially at the end with just 
one quarterback. What's really amaz- 
ing to me is that we gained 260 yards 
on them (rushing) despite the fact that 
we couldn't run inside. They had their 
three defensive linemen up over our 
center and guards and (center Jeff) 
Steers didn't get much help." 

Northwestern is now prepar- 
ing for their season finale this week 
against Stephen F. Austin, a team they 
haven't beat since Goodwin became 



head coach. 

"Their defense could be the 
best we've played against," said 
Goodwin, pointing to the Lumber- 
jacks' top ranking in the rushing and 
total defense departments in the 
Southland Conference. "Their of fenst 
has struggled and has put their de- 
fense in some tough situations. 
They've held some pretty good offen- 
sive teams down and are strong 
against the run. They play pass de- 
fense pretty well, too." 

"We've outplayed them but 
can't seem to win against them. It 
seems like the officiating in this game 
gets me angrier than anything." 

Goodwin said that he may start 
getting the ball to Edwards more in 
this game. The sophomore wide re- 
ceiver has made several big plays in 
the last two games for the Demons. 

"He blocked well and made 
two great runs," Goodwin said. " The 
second one (off of Contreras' fake 
punt) could have went for 87 yards 
with good blocking. He's had two 
straight games now with big plays 
and maybe we should start getting 
him the ball more." 

Goodwin also said that he will 
probably rotate Galloway and Slack at 
quarterback against SFA. 

"Hopefully Rusty will be able 
to go," Goodwin said. "Right now, I'd 
say that he and Gilbert will rotate." 

The Demons and Lumberjacks 
will square off at 7 p.m. Saturday in 
Turpin Stadium for the final home 
game of the year. 




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NSU Students get 20% off with student ID 

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Fighting for extra yardage 




Northwestern State fullback 
Mike O' Neal comes to a stop 
on the turf after a gain against 
Jackson State in which the 
Demons won, 26-24. O' Neal 
and the other Demon running 
backs picked up a season high 
260 yards on the ground against 
the nation's number one de- 
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And he passes, too! 



NSU Ladies take 
fifth place in SLC 
championships: 
SHS-UTA in final 



By TOM WANCHO 
Sports Information 

Northwestern State's Lady 
Demon volleyball team finished its 
season fifth in the Southland Confer- 
ence, one place better than was ex- 
pected going into the Southland Con- 
ference volleyball championships 
held in Prather Coliseum on the NSU 
campus. 

The Lady Demons finished at 
14-13, the first winning record they 
have had since the volleyball program 
was reinstated back in 1983. 

In tournament play, Sam 
Houston State defeated Southwest 
Texas in the loser's bracket to set up a 
rematch against the Lady Mavericks 
of Texas-Arlington as play in the 
Championships moved through the 
second round Monday. 

UTA, which has failed to lose a 
game in three tournament games, 
proved it was worthy of its number 
one seed after sweeping aside Sam 
Houston in the afternoon winner's 
bracket action. Southwest Texas State, 
which played three matches Monday, 
swept North Texas State and North- 
east Louisiana before winding up 
third in overall play. 

Northeast Louisiana won one 
match before seeing its season ended 
by Southwest Texas State after NLU 
came back from a 1-0 deficit to stage a 
3-1 victory over the Lady Demons. 

Sam Houston State, the 
tournament's number three seed, and 
UTA square off in the title game this 
morning at 10 a.m. in Prather Coli- 
seum. 




NKTH 

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Tunter Mark Contreras readies nimselt tor a pass on a fake punt. Al 
Edwards took in the pass and turned it into a 56 yard gain. 

Reminder: Get SLC logo entries in 



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Sports Editor 



All students, faculty, staff, and 
boosters of NSU should get their en- 
tries for the Southland Conference 
logo contest in to Tom Wancho in the 
Sports Information Director's office in 
Prather Coliseum. 



Entries should be submitted in 
two colors and/or black and white on 
an 8 1/2 x 11 sheet of paper. Prizes 
include $20 for winning NSU entrant 
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17 1987 November 17, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Page5 



NEWS 

Jabberwocks to bop in Union 



. 24 



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By RACHEL HEIDER 
Staff Writer 

"Do-wop, shoo-bop, boom-ba- 
ba-de-booms," will be the sounds 
coming out of the Union Station this 
Friday. 

The 1950s sounds will be made 
by Jabberwocks, a men's a cappella 
harmony group. The Jabberwocks, 
who will perform 7 p.m. Friday, will 
be the last act of the Student Activities 
Board fall semester schedule. 

Jabberwocks are a five-man 
group based in Boston. They special- 
ize in 1950s music with their reper- 
toire running the gamut from the 
1940s to contemporary classics. 

The Jabberwocks' harmonizing 
style has been labeled as the second 
coming of the Four Freshman, Mills 
Brothers, Beach Boys and Jackson 
Five combined. They sing favorites, 
rekindle memories and recreate the 
flair of the classic vocal groups while 
adding a little of their own style to 
each piece. 

Ranging in age from 21 to 24, the 
five men of the group have all either 



studied music or performed in chorus 
before becoming professional singers. 

The Jabberwocks have per- 
formed extensively throughout the 
United States. Highlights of their past 
two years of travel include perform- 
ing for the Dallas Mavericks and Los 
Angeles Lakers crowd at Reunion 
Arena in Dallas, Mickey €1116/5 Club 
in Pasadena, The Breakers in Palm 
Beach, Regine's Nightclub in New 
York City, as well as numerous ap- 
pearances on the college circuit. 

Admission to the Jabberwock's 
Friday performance at Northwestern 
is free with NSU ID. Union Station is 
located on the bottom floor of the 
Student Union. 

The Student Activities Board 
(SAB) is also co-sponsoring a Pajama 
Party with the Interfraternity Council 
and Panhellenic 7:30 p.m. Wednesday 
in Union Station. The co-sponsored 
party is being held in an effort to raise 
food and toys for needy children in 
the Natchitoches area. Admission to 
the Pajama Party is free with either a 
canned good or a toy. Those without 



donations 
admission. 



will be charged $1 for 



Although the party is spon- 
sored by Greek organizations as a 
philanthropy project, all Northwest- 
ern students are invited to attend. 
Prizes for the best dressed group and 
best dressed individual will be 
awarded. Food, music and various 
prizes will be available at the party. 

SAB has positions open for the 
spring 1988 semester. Opening 
committee chair positions are La- 
gniappe, Hospitality and Decora- 
tions, and Fine Arts. Also open are 
two representative-at-large positions. 

To be eligible for the positions, 
students must have obtained 12 
hours, maintain a 2.0 grade point 
average and have some experience 
working in student activities. 

Elections will go before the 
Board Dec. 1. Applications may be 
picked up in room 214 of the Student 
Union. 

For additional information call 
357-6511. 




Outstanding Demons recognized 



)UE 

u'on 

JvlES 

:zes 



By SARAH BULLER 
Staff Writer 

In order to recognize outstand- 
ing students, two Demon of the 
Month awards have been established 
at Northwestern. 

The title is awarded monthly 
to two students who have done an 
outstanding job on campus in extra- 
curricular activities and events. 

For October, two young ladies 
have been selected as North western's 
Demon of the Month.The two stu- 
dents are Chrisri Cloutier and Sheila 
Delozia. 

Cloutier is a sophmore major- 
ing in broadcast journalism. Cloutier 
serves as a Northwstern hostess, is a 
member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Soror- 
ity and is on the staff of Potpourri, 
Northwestern's yearbook. 

Cloutier helped plan and carry 
out Senior Day which was held at 



Northwestern Oct. 3. The special day 
was held in order to give high school 
seniors interested in attending North- 
western a chance to visit the campus. 
Cloutier worked in association with 
the Department of Admissions and 
Recruiting on Senior Day. 

Delozia is a senior majoring in 
social work. She is a member of the 
Student Government Association 
(SG A) and is in charge of the Student 
Activity Board's Lady of the Bracelet 
committee. 

Delozia was in charge of coor- 
dinating State Fair Week activities for 
SGA. During State Fair Week Delozia 
was responsible for scheduling the 
State Fair Court's appearances, plan- 
ning SGA activities and coordinating 
the State Fair Brunch in Shreveport. 
State Fair Week was Oct. 19-24. 

"I was very excited and 
happy," Delozia said on being in- 



formed of her selection as Demon of 
the Month. 

Demon of the Month candi- 
dates are selected by Northwestern 
faculty and staff in the Department of 
Student Life and sponsored by the 
Natchitoches Kiwanis Club. 

Mildred Moore, Department 
of Student Life secretary, said, "These 
young women were selected because 
of the outstanding job they did in 
their activities last month." 

The students were given re- 

cogniton in the Natchitoches Times and 
on campus. They were presented free 
movie passes to Parkway Cinema and 
coupons for meals at various restau- 
rants such as Pizza Inn, Pizz Hut, 
McDonald's and Bonanza. 

September's Demons of the 
Month were Dwayne Dupuy, drum 
major of the Spirit of Northwestern, 
and Greg Kendrick, editor of Current 
Sauce. 



Handicapped 
Continued from page l 

and attending classes in particular 
buildings. 

Although the members are 
currently confined to making small 
steps toward more adequate accom- 
modations for themselves, they hope 
for bigger accomplishments in the 
future such as making the entire 
campus accessible for handicapped 
students. 

i Ingram said as more and more 
handicapped students enroll at 
Northwestern, the voice of SAS will 
become louder and stronger. The 
group, which is presently unchar- 
tered, plans to obtain a charter by the 



end of 1988. 

According to Ingram, the 
group expects a significant number of 
handicapped students to enroll at 
Northwestern in the fall 1988 
semester. This increased enrollment 
will help the membership of SAS to 
grow. 

Ingram said the group has 
several long term goals they wish to 
accomplish during the coming years 
including active recruitment of handi- 
capped students. 

Northwestern, given its size 
and understanding attitudes of the 
majority of its faculty and staff, is an 
ideal university for handicapped stu- 
dents who wish to continue their 
education, Ingram said. LSU and 



other large schools are more difficult 
to get around on than a school the size 
of Northwestern, she said. Since ease 
of transportation is a major concern of 
handicapped students, the smaller 
the campus the better. 

Ingram said she would like to 
see Northwestern make a more con- 
certed effort in encouraging disabled 
students to attend school here. 

As the group grows, Ingram 
said, its voice will become stronger 
and its influence more substantial, but 
for now, members are concentrating 
on improving accommodations for 
the handicapped by voicing their 
rights to the appropriate people and 
demanding action be taken. 



Loans 

Continued from page 2 



the size of the loan, the student has up 
to 10 years to repay with a minimum 
annual repayment of $600. Repay- 
ments are made directly to the finan- 
cial institution from which the stu- 
dent chooses to receive the money. 

In addition to the interest rate, 
'he borrower has two additional 
charges. The first, a 5 percent origina- 
tion fee, is used by the federal govern- 
ment to reduce the cost of running the 
Program. A guarantee fee, not to ex- 
ceed 3 percent of the loan, is paid to 
'he agency guaranteeing the student's 
loan. Both fees are deducted from the 
lo an amount before the student re- 
ceives the money from the loan. 

For students receiving a GSL, 
tv vo repayment plans are offered. A 
hxed amount is paid each month in 
Jjhe standard level repayment plan. 

graduated repayment plan al- 
lows the student to pay lower 
monthly installments for the first two 



years after graduation. The monthly 
installments gradually increase after 
the first two years when the student's 
income is expected to increase. 

In order to apply for a GSL, the 
student completes the application for 
federal financial aid and the North- 
western financial aid application, 
indicating financial aid programs in 
which interested. The Student Aid 
Reports, once received, are taken to 
the Department of Financial Aid 
where the student completes a GSL 
application. 

The student has the choice of a 
bank from which to receive the 
money, but Financial Aid counselors 
are available to make suggestions to 
students having trouble deciding on a 
lending institution. 

Once the GSL application is 
processed by Northwestern, it is sent 
to the bank of the student's choice. 
The bank sends the application to a 
guarantee agency. The application is 
then returned to the bank. According 
to Faust, once the application is proc- 
essed by the bank, the student re- 



ceives a check within three weeks. 

Students can borrow up to 
$2,625 for the first two years through 
the GSL. For each additional year, 
students can borrow up to $4,000 
yearly. Graduate students are eligible 
to borrow up to $7,500 each year. 
According to Faust, nearly 1,500 
Northwestern students received 
about $2million through the GSL 
program in 1986-87. 

According to Faust, interest 
rates for these loans are set by the 
Federal Deparment of Education. In 
order to increase the interest rates, he 
said, a regulation change would have 
to be made by the Department of 
Education. 

Students receiving these loans 
must maintain a 2.0 grade point 
average. If the minimum grade point 
average is not met, students will be 
ineligible to receive any further fed- 
eral assistance until their grades are 
improved. 

For more information about 
low-interest federal loans, contact the 
Department of Financial Aid in room 
109 of Roy Hall or call 357-5961. 



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Page 6 



CURRENT SAUCE 



November 17, 1987 



CAMPUS LINE 




Harrington 

Louisiana artist, Chestee Har- 
rington , will have an extensive collec- 
tion of her work featured in an 
"Artist's Corner" exhibit Nov. 6-20 at 
the Cammie G. Henry Research Cen- 
ter in North western's Watson Memo- 
rial Library. The exhibit may be 
viewed Monday through Friday from 
8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. 

A reception honoring Harring- 
ton will be held Friday from 1- 4 p.m. 
in the library research center on the 
third floor of Watson Memorial Li- 
brary. For more information on 
Harrington's exhibit, call the Cammie 
G. Henry Library Research Center at 
357-4585. 

Spring pre-registration 

Advising for spring 1988 pre- 
registration is currently taking place. 
Students wishing to pre-register must 
see their adviser before Nov. 23 in 
order to arrange a tenative spring 
schedule. A student schedule request 
card must be completed prior to pre- 
registration. Pre-registration will be 
held Dec. 1-6. 

A $25 pre-registration fee is 
required. The fee will be subtracted 
from overall charges when a student 
goes to pay fees in January. In order to 
avoid registration lines, students are 
encouraged to pre-register and pay 
fees prior to the January registration. 

For more information on pre- 
registration, contact your adviser or 
the Registrar's Office located in Roy 
Hall. 

Returned checks 

Effective Nov. 23, a $10 service 
charge will be assessed for each check 
returned to Northwestern regardless 
of the reason, according to Bob Gad- 
dis, controller. A $20 charge will be 
assessed in the case of a stop payment 
or closed account. There will be no 
charge for bank error. 

Check cashing privileges will 
be cancelled for anyone who has had 
checks returned for the following 
reasons: three insufficient funds 
checks, one account closed check and 
one stopped payment check. 

Any check or checks returned 
to Northwestern must be paid within 
10 days after the date of written noti- 
fication. Payment for returned checks 
must be paid in cash, cashier's check 
or money order. 



Truman scholarship 

Northwestern sophomores 
interested in a career in government 
service at the federal, state or local 
level are encouraged to apply for a 
1988 Harry S. Truman Scholarship 
worth up to a total of $28,000. 

Established by Congress in 
1975, the Harry S. Truman Scholar- 
ship Foundation offers scholarships 
to outstanding students with poten- 
tial leadership ability in order to pre- 
pare for careers in government serv- 
ice. 

Deadline for 1988 applications 
is Dec. 1. The Foundation will award 
105 scholarships nationally. North- 
western can nominate three students 
for the 1988 competition. 

The scholarship covers eligible 
expenses up to $7,000 per year for the 
junior and senior year and two years 
of graduate study. 

To be eligible, a student must 
be a full-time sophomore working 
toward or planning to pursue a bacca- 
laureate degree, have a B average, 
stand in the upper fourth of the class 
and be a U.S. citizen or hold U.S. na- 
tional heading toward a career in 
government. 

Students interested should 
submit a letter of application, a state- 
ment of career plans, a list of past 
public-service activities or other lead- 
ership positions, a current transcript 
and a 600-word essay discussing a 
public policy issue of their choice to 
Dr. Maxine Taylor in room 301 Kyser 
Hall. Students should contact Taylor 
by Nov. 19. 

For more information, contact 
Taylor at 357-6195. 



Le Cercle Francais 

Le Cercle Francais will meet 1 1 
a.m. Thursday. Members who cannot 
attend should contact Dr. Rubino, 

Le Cercle Francais will hold a 
bake sale in the Student Union Lobby 
Tuesday, Nov. 24, from 9 a.m. to 3 
p.m. 

BACCHUS 

Boost Alcohol Consciousness 
Concerning the Health of University 
Students (BACCHUS) will meet 11 
a.m. Thursday in room 312 of the 
Student Union to discuss their Christ- 
mas project. Evaluations of Alcohol 
Awareness Week will be completed 
during the meeting. BACCHUS has 
entered SAB's annual Christmas win- 
dow painting contest. 



SAB 

The Student Activities Board 
(SAB) is sponsoring their annual 
Christmas window painting contest. 
This year's theme is "The Colors of 
Christmas." Window painting will 
take place at the front of the Student 
Union. 

Painting must begin by Dec. 1 . 
Contest winners will be announced 
Dec. 6 at the main parade during the 
Christmas Festival. The windows will 
be on display from Dec. 5 throughout 
the holiday season. 

Entry deadline is Nov. 18 and 
a $10 entry fee will be charged. Cash 
prizes will be awarded to first, second 
and third place winners. Prizes are 
$100, first place; $75, second place; 
and $50 third place. 

Organizations wishing to take 
part in the contest should go by room 
214 of the Student Union to pick up 
registration forms and painting 
guidelines. 



Corrections 

The Financial Aid Department 
issued $45,000 in Supplemental Edu- 
cational Opportunity Grant money to 
Northwestern students during the 
1986-87 academic year. Issued under 
the State Student Incentive Grant 
during the same time period was 
$47,000 to NSU students. The figures 
appeared in a Nov. 10 issue of the 
Current Sauce as $4,500 and $4,700 
respectively. 

Proficiency test 

First-semester juniors will 
have a second chance to take the writ- 
ing proficiency test this Thursday. 

Students with between 60 and 
74 hours who have not yet passed the 
test should report to 108 William- 
son — the geology and animal sciences 
building — by 11 a.m. Thursday. Stu- 
dents must have their NSU ID to enter 
the test and should take an exam blue 
book, pen and dictionary. 

Results of the exam will be 
posted at the Department of Lan- 
guage Arts, room 318 Kyser Hall, by 
Nov. 30. 

The proficiency test is a re- 
quirement for graduation. 

Graduate fellowships 

Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society is 
offering graduate fellowships for 
support of first year graduate or pro- 
fessional study. The national honor 
society will award the fellowships in 
recognition and encouragement of 
superior scholarship. 

Awarded by the society's 
Board of Directors, the fellowships 
can be up to $6,000. For graduate stu- 
dents receiving additional forms of 
financial aid, the fellowship will be 
awarded based on financial need. 

Recipients must be active 
members of Phi Kappa Phi, must have 
initiated plans to enroll in an ad- 
vanced degree or professional pro- 
gram and must be a first-year gradu- 
ate student. Applications must be 
filed with the local chapter of Phi 
Kappa Phi by Feb. 1, 1988. Fellowship 
awards will be announced by April 1, 
1988. 

For additional information on 
the Phi Kappa Phi fellowships, con- 
tact the local chapter of Phi Kappa Phi 

or Tommy Whitehead at 357-5213. 

Abroad Conference 



Psi Chi 

Psi Chi, national psychology 
honor society, will meet Wednesday 
on the third floor of Bienvenu Hall 
(biology building). Members will dis- 
cuss plans for the Psi Chi Christmas 
Lights Festival booth. All members 
are encouraged to attend. For more 
information contact Tim Wolfe, 357- 
8406. 



Sigma Kappa 

Sigma Kappa Sorority will 
hold a lollipop sale during the month 
of November to raise money for their 
national philanthropy project, 
Alzheimer's Disease. 

Alzheimer's is a progressive 
and debilitating neurological disor- 
der that affects an estimated 2.5 mil- 
lion adults. 

The Sigma Kappas will be 
selling their lollipops on Tuesday and 
Thursday's in the Student Union 
Lobby and on Wednesday's at the 
corner of Williams and Keyser 
Avenue and at the front of Church 
Street. 

Ensemble concert 

The Northwestern Percussion 
Ensemble will present its fall concert 8 
p.m. Wednesday in the Recital Hall of 
the Frederick's Fine Arts Center. The 
program will include contemporary 
works of percussion. 

The concert will also feature 
the Northwestern Jazz Ensemble. The 
program for this jazz group will in- 
clude compositions from artists such 
as Quincy Jones and Ira and George 
Gershwin. 



SGA Week 

The Student Government Asso- 
ciation (SGA) is holding their second 
SGA Week at Northwestern. 

Set for this week, the purpose of 
the event is to inform Northwestern 
students of SGA's purpose, goals and 
accomplishments. Following Mon- 
day night's meeting, SGA members 
attended a dinner at Northwestern 
President Robert Alost's house. 

Tuesday's events include the 
introduction of SGA members in Iber- 
ville Dining Hall at 5 p.m. Throughout 
the day, SGA members will be sta- 
tioned in front of Bossier and 
Boozman halls to distribute informa- 
tion and surveys to residents. 

On Wednesday SGA members 
will distribute information and sur- 
veys to the residents of Natchitoches 
Hall. The SGA will also administer the 
survey in Iberville Dining Hall from 4 
to 6 p.m. during Wednesday's eve- 
ning meal. 

Thursday, the final day of 
November's SGA Week, members 
will be in Iberville Dining Hall at 5 
p.m. to answer questions from stu- 
dents. 

SGA encourages all students to 
attend and participate in the week of 
events. 



ITZA COMING! 





Northwestern is sponsoring a 
conference Tuesday through Thurs- 
day to encourage NSU faculty and 
students to explore opportunities for 
exchange programs with foreign uni- 
versities. 

Herr Rupert Berger of the Jo- 
seph Hayden Gassell Music Institute 
in Eisenstadt, Burgenland, and 
Geoffrey Brown, director of the Inter- 
national Centre at the University Col- 
lege of Wales, will give two of four 
public addresses during the confer- 
ence. 

Berger will speak on 'Tradi- 
tional Offers of Music in Burgenland 
from the View of 1987" 2 p.m. Tues- 
day in the Recital Hall of the A.A. 
Frederick's Creative and Performing 
Arts Center. "British Universities and 
Internationalism" will be the topic of 
Brown's speech scheduled for 10 a.m. 
Wednesday in the Recital Hall. 

Also featured is Dr. Frank 
Hogg, principal of the University 
College of Wales' College of Librari- 
anship. Hogg will speak on "The 
College of Librarianship and Infor- 
mation Studies at the University Col- 
lege of Wales" 11 a.m. Wednesday in 
the Recital Hall. Hogg will also speak 
on "Education Experiences in Indone- 
sia" 11 a.m. Thursday in the Recital 
Hall. 

For more information on the 
NSU Abroad Conference, contact Dr. 
Grady Harper in the Northwestern 
Department of Art at 357-4544. 



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UNDER GLASS 





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17,1987 



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VOL 76 NO. 17 





NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA 



NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 71497 



Media Guide causes sexist controversy 



jnfurnishe 
lectric range, 
itral air and 
month plus 
after 5 p.m. 



THE ALEXANDRIA TOWN 
TALK— The Northwestern 1987-88 
Lady Demons media guide met the 
criticism of two national women's 
sports figures last Wednesday in an 
article printed in the USA Today. 

Dr. Dorothy Harris, of the 
Women's Sports Foundation, and 
Donna Lopianao, Women's Athletic 
Director at the University of Texas, 
criticized the media guide — which 
utilizes design and copy features used 
' by Playboy magazine — as being sex- 

i ist. 



The media guide was designed 
by Northwestern Sports Information 
Director Tom Wancho, and was ap- 
proved by Dr. Alost last May. 

The media guide's cover photo 
features the Lady Demon basketball 
team wearing bunny ears and fluffy 
tails with the title: "These Girls Can 
Play, Boy." 



iiiiiiiiii* 



Contents of the media guide 
include: an account of head coach 
James Smith that said,"if he wasn't 
happily married to a stunning wife 
and father to an equally beautiful 



daughter, one could easily envision 
the personable 39 year old stretched 
out on a chaise lounge surrounded by 
bikini-clad babes, grapes in hand." 

The book also contains a cen- 
terfold roster of the fully-clothed team 
members with a data sheet that states 
"Bust: 36, Waist: 24, Hips: yes." 



Another controversial subject 
was the referral of the Prather basket- 
ball coliseum as the "Lady Demon 
Pleasure Palace." 

According to the November 
25, 1987 article of USA Today, Dr. 
Harris said, "It (the media guide) is 
using women as sexual objects." 

Lopiano said, 'Tire the sports 
information director. In this day and 
age, this is hard to believe." 

According to the November 27 
edition of the Baton Rouge Morning 
Advocate, Wancho said he doesn't 
believe either woman quoted in the 
article had even seen the guide. "I 
know they aren't on our mailing list 
and they haven't got a copy from this 
office, Wancho said. 

In the November 27, 1987 edi- 
tion of the Alexandria Town Talk, the 



statements made by Lopiano and 
Harris were criticized by Northwest- 
ern players and their parents. 'They 
got a little overblown over it," said 
Archie Martin of Anacoco, father ol 
junior forward Lori Martin. "It's no 
big thing. It's a publicity angle. I 
didn't think anything of it." 

His daughter, a pre-season All- 
Southland Conference selection, said 
the Lady Demons loved the guide. 
"At first, we thought it was going tobc 
kind of silly. Once we saw how the 
picture looked, we loved it. Tom did 
a great job. As far as Tom being a 
sexist, that statement is totally un- 
founded. I think they're jumping the 
gun," Lori said. 

Martin said the guide's use of 
the Playboy image enhances the 
team's image. "In general women 
athletes are thought of as being too 
masculine. We thought this format 
would give us a more feminineimage, 
and in fact, it has. We try to perfect a 
ladylike image on and off the court 
and I think the book reflects that," 
Martin said. 

NSU head football coach Sam 



Goodwin has an 18 year-old daughter 
playing as a freshman guard on the 
team. Goodwin said he enjoyed the 
guide. "It was a good, cute, clever 
idea, one of the best I've seen," hesaid. 
"There is nothing in there that is offen- 
sive to me as a parent." 

Goodwin panned the remarks 
made by Lopiano that Wancho be 
fired. "It's really asinine for a person 
to make a comment like that without 
an understanding of what went into 
the publication. She (Lopiano) needs 
to loosen up and enjoy life. This is 
entertainment and fun and games. 
Nobody around here takes offense to 
it," Goodwin said. 

"If I had to do everything over 
again I can't think of anything I would 
change," Wancho said. "I don't think 
there's anything derogatory in it. I am 
a little upset that certain features have 
been taken out of context in the na- 
tional media." 

Last year's Northwestern's 
men's basketball brochure also drew 
national recognition. 

Wancho used a "resurrected" 
theme and featured a cover shot of the 
team in a graveyard. Sports Illustrated 
magazine ran a feature on the guide. 



THESE GIRLS CAN PLAY. BOY 



ENTERTAINMENT FOB ALL 

PLAYER 
PICTORIALS 

JAMES SMITH 
FORIM 



1987-88 l&BT DEMONS 
MtBIA GUIDE 



TEAM 
FOLDOUT 




PERSONAL 
INTERVIEWS 



INDIVIDUAL 
STATISTICS 



ALL-TIME 
RECORDS 



61st Annual Natchitoches Christmas "Festival set for Saturday 



By LISA DARDEN 
Managing Editor 

Although most towns don't 
start thinking about Christmas until 
after Thanksgiving, Natchitoches 
thinks about Christmas in July. 

Set for this Saturday, the long 
awaited Christmas Lights Festival 
promises as many beautiful sights 
and excitements as past festivals. For 
Northwestern students who have 
never attended the lights festival, this 
weekend is highly recommended as 
the weekend to stay in Natchitoches. 

1987 marks the 61st annual 
Christmas Lights Festival. Traditional 
festival highlights include a major 
parade, a Christmas Festival run, 
more than 20 booths on Front Street, a 
fireworks exhibit and the lighting of 
the Christmas lights. 



For those not knowing what to 
expect of the fesitval, expect large 
crowds, good fattening food sold 
along Cane River, a beautiful fire- 
works show, and a breathtaking 
moment when you see the thousands 
of Christmas lights turned on for the 
first time. Expect also to have a good 
time. 

Fireworks for the festival are 
furnished by Zambelli Fireworks 
Company. Zambelli is the same com- 
pany which provided the fireworks 
for the nationally-televised Liberty 
weekend. 

Several of the many food 
booths on Front Street are manned by 
Northwestern groups such as Theta 
Chi and Psi Chi. Booths along Cane 
River sell mostly food, however festi- 
val T-shirts and souvenirs are also 
available. For students interested in 



arts and crafts, many booths and 
tables will be set up around parking 
lots near Front Street. 

Tentative schedule for Satur- 
day is: 8 a.m., Festival Run; 2 p.m. 
Major Parade; and 6:30 p.m. fireworks 
immediately followed by the lighting 
of the lights. 

When there were four months 
and more than 100 shopping days left 
until Christmas, active plans were 
underway in Natchitoches for the 61 st 
annual Christmas Lights Festival. 

According to co-chairman 
Connie Dove, owner of Sunsets Un- 
limited Travel, the actual meeting and 
planning for the festival began last 
January. Dove will be assisted in 
chairing the event by her husband 
Ronnie, who is chief investigator for 
the District Attorney's Office. 

From its small beginning as 



one man's dream in 1927, the festival 
has grown to its current size of more 
than 40 set pieces and 140,000 bulbs 
lighting up the historic streets of 
Natchitoches each Christmas season. 
The annual event, which has been 
listed twice in the top 100 events in 
North America by the American Bus 
Association, now attracts more than 
100,000 people. The festival has been 
featured in such magazines as Louisi- 
ana Life and Southern Living. 

In order to accommodate the 
growing crowds which visit Natchito- 
ches, city officials have made adjust- 
ments in this year's festival. One of the 
major changes, Connie Dove ex- 
plained, was the combining of the 
junior and main parade to one major 
parade. Starting at 2 p.m. from the 
gates of Northwestern, the major pa- 
rade is designed to help avoid traffic 



congestion caused by holding two 
parades. 

"Due to the growing length of 
the two parades and the increase of 
visitors to Natchitoches, we have 
combined the two parades to help 
ease traffic problems," Dove said. 

In addition to combining the 
parades, the parade committee has 
also established new guidelines for 
this year's parade. The guidelines 
include limiting the number of ve- 
hicles allowed and allowing only 
major political figures to ride in the 
parade. The downtown bridge on 
Front Street will be limited to one-way 
traffic Saturday morning in order to 
prepare for the parade. 

"We decided to limit the num- 
ber of vehicles in the parade and allow 
only major political figures to ride in 
order to avoid repetition," Dove said. 



Grand marshal for the parade 
will be Rob Harling, a 1973 graduate 
of Northwestern who has made head- 
lines with his play, "Steel Magnolias." 
The parade will be led by the 1986 

junior parade winning band and will 
feature Astro World and Smurf char- 
acters, reigning queens, Budweiscr 
Clydesdales and prominent political 
figures. 

The parade will also feature 
Miss Merry Christmas and her Belles. 
The reigning Miss Merry Christmas is 
Melanie Kelly, daughter of Senator 
and Mrs. Don Kelly of Natchitoches. 

Other changes made for this 
year's festival include the canceling of 
the airshow. However, a symphony 
and festival concert will be held. 

Remember, the road to Christ- 
mas goes through Natchitoches. 



Kyser Computer Center available as aid to students 



By MICHELLE WEEGO 
Staff Writer 

Unbeknownst to some North- 
western students, modern technology 
is waiting above our very noses to 
lend a helping hand with class work 
and assignments. 

Located on the fourth floor of 
Kyser Hall, the Computer Center is 
open to all NSU and Louisiana School 
for Math, Science and the Arts stu- 
dents. The center has about 50 com- 
puter terminals available to aid stu- 
dents in everything from computer 
mformation homework, to word 
processing a term paper, to locating 
statistics for graduate study. 



'The center is used mainly for 
administrative purposes but it also 
includes academics," Warren Massia, 
acting director of the Computer Cen- 
te r, said. 

Owned jointly by the Louisi- 
ana School and Northwestern, the 
center has two mainframe Digital Vax 
750 computers, one foradministrative 
use and one for student use. The 



administration's computer contains a 
four-part Student Information Sys- 
tem (SIS) package which includes 
programs dealing with student rec- 
ords, transcripts, admissions, finan- 
cial aid and billing and receivables. 
The SIS package is also used to handle 
the payroll of North westerrf employ- 
ees. 



"Registrars and department 
heads use it to keep track of students' 
courses and grades," Massia said. 

The students' use of the Digital 
Vax 750 are much more varied. Com- 
puter information courses teaching 
Cobalt and Fortran computer lan- 
guages are offered by the school for 
students interested in learning to use 



System (SAS) which is a good source 
of information for a graduate student 
doing a thesis or dissertation. 

The Computer Center itself 
contains a variety of terminals for 
student use. Computer information 
system classes 202 and 303 employee 
21 terminals. For general use, 13 Rain- 
bow micro-computers, 10 Kaypro IPs, 
three IBM PC's and three Deckmate II 
terminals available. 



"We have several different 
types of laser printers hooked to these 
terminals," Massia said. "We have 
assistants who work here that can 
help if needed. The only thing we ask 
is that students provide their own 
software. Most of the students who 



the systems. The Basic and Lotus sys- use these computers are taking com- 



tem courses are given in affiliation 
with Northwestern'sbusiness depart- 
ment. 

Located in the student system 
are two statistical packages: Statisti- 
cal Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) 
which is used mainly by social science 
classes and the Statistical Analysis 



puter courses and have software pro- 
vided for them by their teacher." 

Since the entire center is par- 
tially owned by the Louisiana School, 
30 terminals are located in Caddo and 
Prudhomme dorms for the Louisiana 
School students' use. 

Of the number of terminals 



and systems available, the easiest and 
the most popular among students are 
the word processers. 

"These are easy to use. Even 
when someone is not in the room to 
help you, you can figure out what to 
do," Sylvester Roque, NSU graduate 
said. "Last spring I used it to send 
letters to 17 different people. It saved 
me the trouble of typing the same 
letter over and over." 

Richard Darden, house direc- 
tor of Rapides Dorm, said he fre- 
quently takes advantage of the word 
processor. "It's so easy to use the word 
processor. There's no reason to type 
something more than one time." 

The Computer Center staff 
urges all students to make good use of 
what it has to offer. "The saddest part 
about our center is that students don't 
know what we have," Massia said. 

The Computer Center is open 8 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, 9 a.m. to 
noon on Saturdays and 2 to 10 p.m. on 
Sundays. 

Students must produce an ID 
and sign into the Computer Center in 
order to use the terminals. 



NSU graduate to be grand marshal 



By BERTHA MAXIE 
Staff Writer 

Robert Harling, a Northwest- 
ern graduate, has made a name for 
himself in the theater and will return 
to Natchitoches on Dec. 5 to act as 
grand marshal in the 1987 Natchito- 
ches Christmas Festival parade. 

Harling, a 1973 Northwestern 
graduate, obtained a bachelor's de- 
gree in pre-law and history and at- 
tended law school at Tulane. He was 
active in Blue Key, Davis Players and 
Alpha Psi Omega at Northwestern. 

During his college career Har- 
ling possessed a strong interest in the 
theater and made his home in New 
York, where he has lived their for 
eight years. There he began working 
on what started as a short story and 
eventually evolved into the full length 
play. "Steel Magnolias" debuted at 
one of New York's leading off-Broad- 
way houses. 

"Steel Magnolias" is set in the 
fictional town of Chinquapin, La., and 



tells the story of six women. It has 
claimed the attention and positive 
comments from theater critics, as well 
as the interest of theaters as far away 
as Chicago, Atlanta, Los Angelas and 
London. 

Harling, a native of Nachito- 
ches, based his play on his hometown. 
According to Harling everything 
which happened in the play actually 
occurred in real life, "but much 
worse." 

The play, which is billed as a 
comedy also contains elements of 
tragedy which were based on the 
death of his sister Susan. The six char- 
acters, all females, in Harling's play 
have been referred to by one critic as, 
"a minidrama in herself." 

Harling has jumped into the 
world of the theater with "Steel Mag- 
nolias" and apparently landed on his 
feet. "Steel Magnolias" will not be the 
last theatrical work seen from Robert 
Harling. This native of Natchitoches 
plans to write more and to some day 

perform on stage himself. 



FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 



Wednesday, December 9: 

8:00 - 10:30 a.m. 10:00 MWF & Daily 

12:00- 2:30 p.m Eng 0910, 0920, 

1010,1020 

' 3:30 - 6:00 p.m 3:00 MWF & Daily 

Thursday, December 10: 

8:00-10:30 a.m 9:30 TR 

12:00 - 2:30 p.m 12:30 TR 

3:30 - 6:00 p.m 3:30 TR 

Friday, December 11: 

8:00 - 10:30 a.m 9:00 MWF & Daily 

12:00 - 2:30 p.m ...8:00 TR 

3:30 - 6:00 p.m. .....2:00 TR 



Saturday, December 12: 

8:00-10:30 a.m 11:00 TR 

12:00 - 2:30 a.m 12:00 MWF & Daily 

Monday, December 14: 

8:00 - 10:30 a.m 1 1 :00 MWF & Daily 

12:00 - 2:30 p.m 8:00 MWF & Daily 

3:30 - 6:00 p.m .....Unscheduled exams 

Tuesday, December 15: 

8:00 - 10:30 a.m 1 :00 MWF & Daily 

12:00 - 2:30 p.m 2:00 MWF & Daily 

3:30 - 6:00 p.m 4:00 MWF & Daily 

Wednesday, December 16: 

8:00 - 10:30 a.m .....Unscheduled exams 



Page 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



December 1, 1987 



NEWS 



Financial Aid offers easier access fo loans 



By MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
Staff Writer 



PLUS (Parent Loans for Undergradu- 
ate Students). The SLS, a recently new 
loan, is received by independent, 
married or graduate students. The 
PLUS, also in existence for only a few 
years, is generally taken out by the 
parents of an undergraduate. Student 
dents are not eligible for the three low- income is not a factor for the SLS and 



Many Northwestern students 
pre finding loans a necessity to pay 
Spring tuition, yet some of these stu- 



jnterest, need based loans offered by 
the Northwestern Financial Aid De- 
partment and the Federal Govern- 
ment. Other students may already 
have one of these loans but need a 
little extra money to get by on. 

For these students there are 
two supplemental loans offered that 
are not based on student income. 

These loans are the SLS (Sup- 
plemental Loans for Students) and the 



parent income is not a factor for the 
PLUS since the loans are not need 
based. 

Interest rates for these loans 
are much higher than those of the 
Perkins, GSL (Guaranteed Student 
Loan) or the Nursing Student Loan. 
Generally, interest rates for the SLS 
and the PLUS range from 10 percent to 
12 percent. Presently, the interest rate 
for these loans is 10.26 percent. 



The SLS and the PLUS can be 
received in addition to other low- 
interest loans and grants. Many of the 1 
factors concerning the SLS and the : 
PLUS are alike. Up to S4,000 per year'' 
can be borrowed through the SLS and 
PLUS programs. A cumulative total of 
S20,000 can be borrowed through the 
programs. The limits borrowed 
through these loan programs do not 
include monies borrowed through 
other loan programs such as the GSL 
program. 

One negative factor to borrow- 
ing from the SLS or the PLUS program 
is the repayment schedule. Repay- 
ment of these loans begins immedi- 
ately. The first installment is due 60 
days after the student receives the 



loan money. 

Students borrowing from the 
SLS program may defer the payment 
of loan principal and interest while 
holding an in-school status. Deferred 
interest will be added to the student's 
principal balance to be repaid after 
graduation. 

Students interested in receiv- 
ing one of these loans should contact 
the Financial Aid Department where 
counselors will explain the specifics 
concerning the programs. The coun- 
selors are also trained to insure a stu- 
dent has considered all free forms of 
financial aid. 

For more information on the 
SLS or the PLUS programs, contact 
the Financial Aid Office at 357-5961. 



Northwestern personnel receives new university cars 



By DAN MEDLIN 
Staff Writer 

Northwestern personnel may 
be able to drive down Louisiana's 
lonely highways with a little more 
confidence because of the purchase of 
six, 1988 model, Ford Escorts for the 
motor pool. 

Bob Gaddis, controller of 
Northwestern, said that the college 
can afford the six Ford Escort station 
wagons. "The funding forthe vehicles 
comes from the General Operating 
Budget, the money of which comes 
from State and Federal funding as 
well as from tuition," Gaddis said. 

Dr. James Haley, vice presi- 



dent of university affairs, cleared up 
many questions as to why in this time 
of cut-backs, we are acquiring new 
vehicles. 'There was a freeze on buy- 
ing vehicles at the time we deter- 
mined a need for these and I believe 
there still is, that is why we are leasing 
these cars," Haley said. Dr. Haley, 
among his many other responsibili- 
ties, is in charge of ordering the ve- 
hicles and assigning them to the dif- 
ferent departments. 

Dr. Haley said that the reason 
they had to get Ford Escorts was these 
cars were the only type approved on 
the State Contract list. "The cars are 
presently being leased on a three year 



contract," Haley said. 

Sandra Morcau, Head of the 
Northwestern pool said, 'The two 
station wagons were assigned to the 
Admissions Department, after they 
gave up one of theirs to the general 
motor pool, and the rest of the new 
cars were assigned to the general 
motor pool." 

Moreau said the vehicles were 
most likely needed, because the older 
cars have seen some years and many 
miles. 'The new cars the Admissions 
office have are used for long trips and 
recruiting, in which case a reliable 
vehicle is mandatory," Moreau said. 

University Police Chief 



Crawford Ficklin said,"The Univer- 
sity Police department took over con- 
trol of the Motor Pool July 13th, and 
the ordering for these vehicles took 
place before that time," 

When asked of the police 
department's status with vehicles, 
Chief Ficklin said the department is 
running with three "clunkers." The 
Chief hopes that some of the new 
sedans they are expecting will be as- 
signed to the University Police. 

Any department or chartered 
and sponsored organization at NSU 
may request one of the vehicles in the 
general motor pool for a trip relating 
to an NSU function. 



Demon football loses six senior players this season 



By SONYA RIGAUD 
Staff Writer 

The 33-21 win over Stephen F. 
Austin on November 21, 1987 will 
forever be remembered by a certain 
group of Northwestern Demons. This 
group consists of the six senior foot- 
ball players on the team this season. 

The senior Demons are Todd 
Blanchard, Gary Cater, Keith Chil- 
dress, John Kulakowski, Curtis Stegar 
and John Stephens. 

The Northwestern vs. Stephen 
F. Austin battle was the last collegiate 
football game for each of these ath- 
letes. They captured a victory and 
won back the "chief from SFA. 

Todd Blanchard, 22, is a native 
of Coushatta majoring in Physical 
Education. 

While in Coushatta, Blanchard 
received four football and track letters 
at Riverdale Academy. He was 
named to both all-district and all-state 
teams during his final two seasons 
and played for the North All-Stars 
following his senior season. 

Blanchard, 5-11, 221 pound 
linebacker, finished his college career 
in football with 53 tackles, 29 of those 
solo and 24 assists. He has excelled on 
special teams and is a two year letter- 
winner. 

Blanchard began his college 
career at Northeast, later transferring 
to Northwestern. Here at Northwest- 
ern, Blanchard has learned that noth- 
ing comes easily. He said, "One has to 
work hard for everything in life." 

Blanchard said that what he 
will remember most about being a 
Northwestern football player is hav- 
ing a winning season and playing ball 
with a lot of great ball players. 

Blanchard plans to graduate in 
Fall 1988 and eventually open his own 
health club. 

Gary Cater came to North- 
western from Riverfield Academy in 
Rayville where he won 14 letters in 
baseball, basketball, football and 
track. He was a running back and 
strong safety for his team that went 8- 
4 his senior season whileadvancingto 
the state playoffs. He earn«d all-state 
honors in football and all-district 
mention in basketball. 

Cater, 5-11, 185 pound line- 
backer, closed his football career with 



68 solo tackles and 79 assists adding 
up to 147 tackles all together. His 
seven pass breakups were the third 
highest on the team this year. His total 
of 70 tackles for this past season was 
seventh best. He is a four year letter- 
winner. 

Cater, a wildlife management 
major, is a member of the Forestry 
Wildlife Conservation Club as well as 
the Northwestern football team. 

Cater, who plans to graduate 
in Fall 1988, said, "After I graduate I 
plan to try my hand at farming by 
taking over the family farm." 

Cater said he has learned a lot 
from playing football at Northwest- 
ern. '13y playing football I have be- 
come mentally prepared to take on 
tough situations that lie ahead and 
also I have learned that hard work 
definitely pays off," Cater said. 

Cater is the 21 -year-old son of 
David and Louise Cater of Rayville. 

Keith Childress, 22, is a busi- 
ness administration major from LaP- 
lace. 

Childress was offensive line 
Most Valuable Player while at East 
Saint John's High School. He was also 
a two time all-district winner and 
named to Who's Who and Distin- 
guished Society of American High 
School Students. 

Childress, 6-2, 254 pound of- 
fensive tackle, finished this season as 
a four year letterwinner. He earned 
second team all-Gulf Star choice in 
1986. He is considered to be 
Northwestern's most consistant of- 
fensive lineman, having played five 
different positions in his four year 
career. 

He hopes to have a chance as a 
free-agent in the pros. If this is not 
possible, Childress plans to attend 
graduate school. 

Childress said his most memo- 
rable events as a player are when 
Northwestern beat Southern Missis- 
sippi 22-0 and his final game against 
SFA which won the "chief" back for 
Northwestern. 

Childress feels that he has 
gained a lot from working with the 
other Demons here at Northwestern. 
"I think the most important things I 
have gained is responsibility, disci- 
pline and leadership qualities. Also, I 



have many memories that I will take 
with me forever," Childress said. 

Childress, who will graduate 
in Spring 1988, is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry L. Childress. 

Another farewell goes to John 
Kulakowski, 22, of Kenner. Kulakow- 
ski, who everyone knows as "Kool", is 
a public relations major with a minor 
in English. 

Kulakowski attended Bonna- 
bel High School where he served as a 
linebacker and was all-East Bank, all 
district performer along with team 
MVP. He earned three football letters 
and one in wrestling. 



Kulakowski, 6-2, 229 pound 
defensive end, is a four year starter 
and a four year letterwinner. He has 
been the inspirational leader for the 
Demon defense. He has the team's 
third highest tackle amount this year 
with 84 stops. His total number of 
tackles is 327, consisting of 190 solo 
tackles and 137 assists. He led the 
team this year in quarterback sacks 
with 15 and tackles for loss with nine. 

At Northwestern, Kulakowski 
served as secretary for the Public Re- 
lations Student Society of America, 
was named to Who's Who Among 
Students in American Colleges and 
Universities and was a runner-up for 
Mr. NSU. 

Kulakowski said that if he is 
unable to find employment after 
graduating from Northwestern, he 
intends to go to graduate school. 

Among the many things 
Kulakowski has learned from NSU 
football are teamwork, attitudes to 
always do your best at all times, and 
giving 100% in everything you do. 

Kulakowski said the times he 
will most remember at Northwestern 
are his first two games as a starter, 
winning the conference in 1984, and 
bringing back the "chief". 

Kulakowski has 2brothers and 
5 sisters; Michelle, his youngest sister, 
also attends Northwestern. He is the 
son of Shirley and Ed Kulakowski. 

Curtis Stegar transferred to 
Northwestern from the University of 
Arkansas after deciding to finish his 
college career here in Natchitoches. 
Stegar, 22, is from Atlanta, Texas. 
While attending Atlanta High School, 



The Northwestern footbal] 
team loses six of its most valu' 
able players this season. Th« 
senior players are: 45, John 
Kulakowski of Kenner; 48, Todd 
Blanchard of Coushatta; 24, Gary 
Cater of Rayville; 52, Keith 
Childress of LaPlace; 93, Curtis 
Stegar of Atlanta, Texas; 4, John 
Stephens of Springhill. They 
played in their iast collegiate 
game on November 21, 1987 in 
33-21 win over Stephen F. Austin 



he was a two-time first team all-dis- 
trict basketball and football player. 
He was named all state football and 
and all region basketball player as a 
senior in high school, along with all- 
Northeast Texas. 

Stegar, 6-4, 225 pound defen- 
sive end and tackle, has contributed 
on both defensive line and as a special 
teams player in his first year as a 
Demon. He is a one year letterwinner 
and has 18 recorded tackles, nine of 
those solo and nine assists. 

After graduating in Summer 
1988, Stegar plans to get a good job in 
the area of physical education. 

Stegar said he has learned how 
to keep going when things get tough 
while playing football for Northwest- 
ern. 

He is the son of Curtis Lee 
Stegar, Sr. 

John Stephens came to North- 
western from Springhill High School 
where he was an offensive lineman 
until his senior year. He switched 
positions and began playing running 
back because of a knee injury to the 
team's star runner. As a high school 
senior in 1983, he rushed for over 
1,984 yards and 28 touchdowns. 

He was also a state champion 
in the shot put and the runner-up in 
the 200-meter dash. 

Stephens, 6-2, 215 pound 
tailback, is a four year starter and a 
four year letterwinner. 

Despite suffering a knee in- 
jury which required surgery halfway 
through the season and only playing 
in seven games, Stephens surpassed 
the late Joe Delaney as 
Northwestern's all-time leading 
rusher with 3,057 yards on 653 at- 
tempts, including 646 yards this year 
on 132 totes. 

He is only one of three players 
in Northwestern history to go over the 
1,000 yard mark. 

Stephens, 22, has one younger 
sistei and is the son of Thelma 
Stephens. 

Tom Wancho, NSU Sports In- 
formation Director, said that 
Stephens is the greatest running back 
to play at Northwestern. 

These guys contributed a great 
amount of energy and ambition to the 
NSU Demons and should be proud of 
their accomplishments. Congratula- 
tions! 





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CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



SPORTS 



pemons end 1987 campaign at 6-5 
as Stephens has banner final season 




By KIRK COPEIAND 
Sports Editor 

To say that the 1987 North- 
western State football year has been a 
success would almost be an under- 
statement. In a season that had high 
points — such as defeats of lofty Ar- 
ansas State and Jackson State and 
John Stephens surpassing Joe Dc- 
laney as the all-time leading Demon 
rusher in the season's final game — 
and low points — two consecutive 
losses in the last minute of play and a 
loss to arch-rival Louisiana Tech — the 
Demons came out with a 6-5 record to 
give them their first back-to-back non- 
losing seasons in ten years. 

The Demons opened the sea- 
son with a shocking 23-20 victory over 
then-second ranked Arkansas State in 
a game that saw the Demons battle 

Fond Farewell 



from behind to beat the Indians. 
Stephens started his year off with an 
incredible 170 yards rushing against 
the highly-touted ASU defense. 

McNeese State was the next 
victim for the Purple Ones as the 
Demons rolled up 502 total yards en 
route to a 39-3 lambasting of the 
Cowboys. 

North Texas State began what 
would be a six game stretch in which 
the Demons would only win one 
game. Leading 13-12 with less than six 
minutes to play, the NSU offense 
fumbled, setting up a last minute field 
goal for the Mean Green Eagles and a 
15-13 defeat. 

Homecoming proved to be a 
continuation of the previous week's 
nightmare as the Demons hosted 
Northeast Louisiana. Scott Stoker led 
NSU in a gutsy performance that saw 
the Men in Purple take a 31-27 lead 
into the final 13 seconds of play. Two 



plays later, NLU's Stan Humphries 
fired a 48 yard touchdown pass as 
time expired to give the Indians the 
33-31 victory. 

NSU followed with four lack- 
luster performances losing to South- 
western Louisiana 13-3, beating 
Southwest Texas State 24-21, and los- 
ing to La. Tech, 23-0, and Sam Hous- 
ton State, 34-7. 

Just when it appeared that the 

Demons were headed for the cellar, 
they came from behind to beat 
Nicholls State, 31-28, to send them 
home for the final two games with a 4- 
5 record. 

Things were not promising, 
however, as NSU had to face the top- 
ranked defense in the country against 
fourth-ranked Jackson State. The 
Demons responded by rolling up 260 
yards rushing, grabbing the early 
lead, and riding it to a 26-24 victory. 

The season finale was a memo- 




Seniors John Stephens (4) and John Kulakowski (45) make big plays for the Northwestern State De- 
mons in last Saturday's 33-21 victory in the season finale. Stephens ended the game as the all-time 
leading rusher in Northwestern State history while Kulakowski anchored the defense. Also playing 
in their final game were Gary Cater, Curtis Stegar, Keith Childress and Todd Blanchard. 



tipfn . -J 




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Angela Tinnerello 
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Daynell Brouillette 



Women 
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Kempa Meachum 
Angela Ortego 
Tracy Fisher 



Women 

TJn Kappa Fifth 
Ginger Craig 
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Chris Bodine 
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rable one for Stephens as the highly- 
acclaimed tailback rushed for 104 
yards to break Delaney's school ca- 
reer rushing record. Northwestern 
State ran up their second highest point 
total of the year as they beat Stephen F. 
Austin, 33-21 . 

With only six seniors leaving, 
the prospects for a successful season 
next year are bright. 

"I like next year's schedule a lot 
more," said Demon head man Sam 
Goodwin, pointing out the Demons' 
1987 schedule was the fourth-tough- 
est in the nation. "We don't play our 
first conference game until October." 

As far as the excitement de- 
partment goes, NSU will have a hard 
time repeating this year's perform- 
ance, in which six Demon games were 
decided by three points or less. Good- 
win will settle for less dramatic wins 
just the same. 

I-M department 
begins upgrades 

By CHRIS HUNT 
Staff Writer 

The intramural department 
has begun a list of renovations to 
improve its facilities for the use of 
NSU students. 

The department has replaced 
the once ragged section of screen at 
the back of the racquetball courts. 
They have also retaped the serving 
stripes and repainted the walls of the 
courts. 

Four used pool tables are to be 
reconditioned for the students use. 
The tables will get new legs and they 
will be recovered with new felt cov- 
ers. They will be available next 
semester for use. 

The intramural department 
has also scheduled an awards ban- 
quet for the winners of the fall money 
events. The banquet will include a 
generous dinner menu and is by in- 
vitation only. The price for the meal is 
$3. 

Along with these improve- 
ments, the volleyball league is still in 
full swing, and the intramural depart- 
ment is preparing for basketball next 
semester. 



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Page 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



December 1 , 1987 



NEWS 



Northwestern's Admissions department reveals recruiting plans 



By Michelle Weego 
Staff Writer 

Choosing the right college to 
attend has always been a major deci- 
sion, but the NSU Admissions team is 
making the choice a little easier for 
many Louisiana high school stu- 
dents. 

Mrs. Georgia Beasley, director 
of Admissions, heads a staff of three 
full-time recruiters and one part-time 
recruiter which is also shared with the 
Scholars' College. 

"Each recruiter does the stan- 
dard admissions work but also has a 
separate special job. Craig Scott 
handles publications, Lisa Hatlcy is in 
charge of promotion, Marilyn Haley 
brings special groups on campus and 
Gail Jones, who also works with 
Scholars' College, takes care of sched- 
uling and scholarships," Beasley said. 

A recruiting year begins with a 
stage of preparation between July 1 
and August 23. During this time all 
supplies are ordered, printing is done 
and fall visits are scheduled for state 
high schools. August 23 turns the 
team into a support staff for new stu- 
dents, helping with both the actual 
registration and orientation. 



The staff spends from Septem- 
ber 15 through the month of February 
visiting high schools in affiliation 
with an organization of high school 
recruiters. This organization sched- 
ules the dates and "zones" of college 
and career days across Louisiana. 

"Right now we're working in 
the Lafayette/Lake Charles area. All 
the recruiters go to the schools to- 
gether and give presentations. It re- 
ally helps out when we cooperate on a 
schedule like this," Beasley said. 
"This is also our busiest season. We 
have our recruiters out five days a 
week. Sometimes three or four of us 
are gone at a time." 

"Beside zone recruiting we also 
schedule personal visits with high 
schools," Beasley said. "We often 
concentrate on area high schools. For 
example, I spent one whole day just at 
Natchitoches Central High School. 
Some schools request special pro- 
grams such as financial aid, so work- 
shops are given by that department." 

Courtesy visits with high school 
counselors are made to provide infor- 
mation for interested students and to 
keep good relations between North- 
western and the high schools. 

Beasley stated, "These visits are 



the most important part of our pro- 
gram. We are giving students a chance 
to become aware of NSU's many 
opportunities. If we don't make a 
good impression on college day, the 
students won't come to visit the cam- 
pus." 

"We've really had good results 
with these visits. About 80% of the 
students we visit do apply to North- 
western and that's worth the effort." 

During the months of March 
and April student groups such as 
FBLA, FHA and FFA are brought on 
campus for tours. Northwestern also 
sponsors events like Journalism Day, 
speech tournaments, academic rally 
and Chem Quest, a quiz bowl for high 
school chemistry students. 

There are also large programs 
that invite students for longer visits. 
Two recent visits included Senior Day 
during NSU Homecoming and Schol- 
ars' Weekend the 21st of November. 
Another Scholarship Weekend is 
scheduled for February. 

Several high school entertain- 
ment groups, such as bands, cheer- 
leading squads and dancelines, are 
asked to perform at home football and 
basketball games. NSU also sponsors 
a danceline seminar during the year. 



'The purpose of these visits is to 
expose them to what NSU has to offer. 
We give them academic information, 
freebees and tours of the campus," 
Beasley said. 

Recruiter Craig Scott describes 
the job he faces, "Every day is differ- 
ent, but busy. When I'm on the road I 
spend time in at least three various 
college programs a day. The recruit- 
ing organization schedules high 
schools in a certain area, usually not 
more than an hour apart. There may 
be a program from 8:00 a.m. to noon, 
another from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. 
and one more at night. We may spend 
a week visiting just one area," Scott 
said. 

"Most high schools invite all 
state colleges and military recruits. 
Larger schools may invite those, plus 
bank officials and vocational school 
recruits." 

The recruiters use two separate 
programs. One is the "browse dis- 
play" usually placed in a gym or cafe- 
teria along with other university dis- 
plays. This gives students the free- 
dom to wander from table to table. 

"This program is effective in 
reaching more people. You get to see a 
lot more students," Scott said. 



The second program is the class- 
room setting. A 20 to 50 minute ses- 
sion is presented to a group of inter- 
ested students who would like more 
details about Northwestern. It in- 
cludes a six minute slide show and 
discussions concerning the history of 
Northwestern, financial aid, academ- 
ics, student life, and dormitories. 

"At this time we encourage stu- 
dents to go visit the campus. We feel 
that they can find out what NSU is 
really like if they come see us during 
the summer, weekends or breaks 
from school," Scott said. 

Mailing information about 
Northwestern is also a large part of 
the recruiting system. The admissions 
office relies on ACT reports and stu- 
dent information request cards to 
send social and academic material 
from the university. 

"The office uses a computer 
system called the Helper Y as a track- 
ing device. It tells us what information 
we have sent to whom and what we 
should send next," Scott stated. "We 
have NSU students who volunteer to 
call high school students at home and 
ask if they have any questions about 
Northwestern. We also try to send out 
as many personal letters as possible." 



"I met a high school student and 
her father in New Iberia a few week, 
ago. Both said they were impressed 
with NSU's recruiting system. She 
had received three informational let. 
ters, a phone call and a personally 
handwritten letter. Things like thai 
make us feel we have an impact* 
Scott said. 

A new policy Beasley is trying t 
develop is the "each one recruit one- 
system. "Our students would become 
our best recruiters. This is a team 
approach involving everyone related 
to Northwestern," Beasley said. 
"When students go home for the' 
weekend or on holidays, we warn 
them to talk up Northwestern. If each 
student could recruit one student 
either a relative or a friend, NSU could' 
become a friendlier campus. Every, 
one would know everyone." 

When searching for recruiters 
the admissions department usually 
looks for public relations or education 
graduates from NSU. "We need 
someone used to speaking to large 
groups," Beasley said. "Wc look for 
upbeat, positive, enthusiastic people. 
Most importantly we need energetic 
people who arc not afraid to travel 
alone. Of course, we're always look- 
ing for volunteers." 





Drawing released by the Walker County Sherif Department 
of homicide suspect involved in the Huntsville, Texas stabbing. 



Texas authorities ask NSU students help inhomicide case 



By GREG KENDRICK 
Editor 

Authorities in Texas are re- 
questing the help of Northwestern 
students in tracking down a suspect in 
a homicide which occured last Octo- 
ber 31 in Huntsville, Texas. 

Some leads and accounts from 
witnesses within the area of the homi- 
cide have indicated to authorities that 
the suspect in question may be from 
the Northwestern area. 

According to Deputy Sheriff 
Byron Bush, of the Walker County 
Sheriff Department, the victim, Mary 
Carrell Risinger was found dead the 
night of October 31, 1987 at the Max- 
Kar car wash at 2821 Farm Market 
road. The autopsy indicates the vic- 
tim died from a stab wound to the 
lower left neck. The victim's three- 



Spring pre-registration 

Advising for spring 1988 pre- 
registration is currently taking place. 
Students wishing to pre-register must 
see their adviser before Nov. 23 in 
order to arrange a tenative spring 
schedule. A student schedule request 
card must be completed prior to pre- 
registration. Pre-registration will be 
held Dec. 1-6. 

A $25 pre-registration fee is 
required. The fee will be subtracted 
from overall charges when a student 
goes to pay fees in January. In order to 
avoid registration lines, students are 
encouraged to pre-register and pay 
fees prior to the January registration. 

For more information on pre- 
registration, contact your adviser or 
the Registrar's Office located in Roy 
Hall. 



Who's who 

Thirty-nine Northwestern stu- 
dents will be included in the 1988 
edition of Who's Who Among Stu- 
dents in American Universities and 
Colleges. 

Students are nominated for the 
honor based on academic achieve- 
ment, service to the community, lead- 
ership in extracurricular activities 
and potential for continued success. 

Northwestern students named 
to Who's Who Among Students in 
American Universities and Colleges 
this year are: Kimberly Antee, Donald 
Davis, Marti Elkins, Jimmie 
McCormick, Marsha McLamore, Dan 
Medlin and Carolyn Payne, Natchito- 
ches; Debbie Cable and Angela Gip- 
son, Leesville; Mark Colomb, Lafay- 
ette; Sondra Dyes, Belmont; Alvin 
Graber, Pleasant Hill; Donald Hall 
and Karen Sparks, Elm Grove; Martin 
Harrell, Little Rock, Arkansas; Kim 
Hcbcrt, Alexandria; Rachael Heider, 
Donaldsonville; Janice Henderson, 
Dorothy Hewitt and Vernell Wiggins, 
Mansfield; Cathy Holmes, Montgom- 
ery; Steve Horton, New Iberia; Monte 
Johnson and Dawn Williams, DeRid- 
der; Maria Johnston, Provencal; 
Sharon Kelly, Lemeul Marshall, 
Stephanie Reynolds, George Thorn 
and Sidney Youngblood, Shreveport; 
John Kulakowski, Kenner; Michelle 
Lavergne, Opclousas; Bertha Maxie, 
Florien; Cindy McAbee, Fort Recov- 
ery, Ohio; Leigh Myers, Pelican; 
Susan Slay, Fisher; Todd Sterling, 
Baton Rouge; Shavon Sullivan, Saline; 
and Patricia A. Williams, Lecompte. 



Graduate fellowships 

Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society is 
offering graduate fellowships for 
support of first year graduate or pro- 
fessional study. The national honor 
society will award the fellowships in 
recognition and encouragement of 
superior scholarship. 

Awarded by the society's 
Board of Directors, the fellowships 
can be up to $6,000. For graduate stu- 
dents receiving additional forms of 
financial aid, the fellowship will be 
awarded based on financial need. 

Recipients must be active 
members of Phi Kappa Phi, must have 
initiated plans to enroll in an ad- 
vanced degree or professional pro- 
gram and must be a first-year gradu- 
ate student. Applications must be 
filed with the local chapter of Phi 
Kappa Phi by Feb. 1, 1988. Fellowship 
awards will be announced by April 1, 
1988. 

For additional information on 
the Phi Kappa Phi fellowships, con- 
tact the local chapter of Phi Kappa Phi 
or Tommy Whitehead at 357-5213. 



Psi-Chi 

Psi-Chi, the honorary psychol- 
ogy society, is sponsoring a food drive 
to help the less fortunate at Christmas. 
Donations of canned and boxed food 
will be greatly appreciated. Dona- 
tions can be dropped off in the box 
located in front of the Student Life 
Office on the second floor of the Stu- 
dent Union until Dec. 4. Donations 
will also be received in Room 305 of 
the Student Union. 



LAESP 

The Louisiana Association of 
Educators-Student Program will hold 
a meeting Thursday at 11 a.m. in Pod 
D of the Teacher Education Center. 
The purpose of the meeting is to plan 
a banquet for the Education Methods 
Students. All LAESP members must 
attend. 

S.A.S. 

S.A.S. has arranged transpor- 
tation for any students who because of 
handicaps cannot operate a vehicle. 
Transportation is provided on Friday 
afternoons to local stores. Contact the 
Academic Support Services Program 
office at 104 Kyser Hall or call 357- 
5901 for more information. 



year-old daughter was present at the 
time of the murder and suffered mi- 
nor cuts to her arm. 

Bush said some individuals 
driving by the car wash earlier in the 
night saw Risinger struggling with 
one of two individuals in a pick-up 
truck. "The two witnesses saw the 
two young men approach and start a 
scuffle," Bush said, "She was later 
found dead in one of the wash bays." 

Bush said that the eyewit- 
nesses were able to describe one of the 
suspects as a white male, 5' 8" to 5'11" 
in height, 20 to 30 years old, slim built, 
with sandy blonde hair. He was last 
seen wearing a blue pull-over, short 
sleeved shirt with a collar and blue 
jeans. The witnesses said this was the 
man fighting with Risinger. 

Bush said the two suspects 
were seen climbing in and out of a late 
model, two-toned pick-up truck at the 



car wash. 

Bush said the Sheriff's Depart- 
ment investigated another incident 
that day involving a pick-up truck of 
the samedescription. "In this incident 
a truck driver complained about a late 
model, two-toned pick-up truck that 
was swerving and acting disorderly 
in front of him," Bush said. "Thetruck 
driver wasn't able to get the license 
plate, nor a description of the driver 
and passenger, but he did notice that 
the rear license plate holder said 
'Northwestern' on the back of it." 

Bush pointed out the the 
Northwestern State University foot- 
ball team was in town that day to play 
Sam Houston State University. "With 
Northwestern being on the plate 
holder, and Northwestern being in 
town we couldn't afford to pass this 
possibility up," Bush said. 

The description of the 



suspect's vehicle, as described in the 
two separate incidents, is a late- 
model, dark brown CMC or Chevy 

pick-up, with a wide cream stripe on 
the sides. It had a short wheel base, 
chrome wheels, chrome bumper and 
chrome protective stripping on the 
tailgate. It possibly has a roll bar 
painted the same dark color of the 
truck. 

Bush said that several law en- 
forcement agencies are cooperating in 
finding this suspect. "We are receiv- 
ing help from the FBI, the Texas Rang- 
ers, The Natchitoches Parish Sheriffs; 
Office, and the University Police," 
Bush said. 

Bush said that if an individual 
has any information that could hclpin 
finding the suspect, he or she should 
contact the Walker County Sheriffs 
Department at (409) 295-8154. 



SAM 

Temporary officers for the 
Society for the Advancement of Man- 
agement for 1988 are Dion Boyett, 
president; Jerry Creamer, vice presi- 
dent and treasurer; Syed Muun- 
awwar Hasan, secretary. 

There is a booth in the Business 
Administration building for all per- 
sons interested in joining SAM for the 
spring semester. 

The annual SAM banquet will 
be held at Bonanza at 7 p.m. Dec. 3. 
Any members who have not signed 
up to attend the banquet, should con- 
tact Rhonda Henderson at 357-5534. 

Research day 

The CURIA will sponsor Re- 
search Day for faculty, students and 
the Natchitoches community Feb. 9, 
1988 at Northwestern. Dr. Paul Ehrl- 
ich, a Stanford University biologist, 
will be the keynote speaker. 

Research Day is designed to 
encourage faculty and students to 
share research, creativity or perform- 
ance. Faculty and students who wish 
to participate should submit a brief 
abstract of their research to the office 
of the Graduate School by 4:30 p.m., 
Dec. 10. Abstract forms can be ob- 
tained in the Graduate School office, 
Room 209, Roy Hall, and should in- 
clude title, presenter and should not 
exceed 350 words Three copies of the 
abstract should be submitted, and 
student participants should include 
the name of the faculty adviser or 
sponsor. 

Abstracts will be reviewed by 
members of the CURIA, and selected 
participants will be notified by Dec. 
18. A luncheon is also planned for 
noon on Research Day at Northwest- 
ern. 

Commuters 

The Commuting and Return- 
ing Students' Support Group will 
meet today in the lounge at 104 Kyser 
Hall. The group will discuss child care 
during summer school and setting up 
a booth during registration to reach 
commuting and re-entry students. All 
members and anyone interested in 
attending are urged to attend. 

Kappa Alpha 

Newly elected officers of 
Kappa Alpha are: Randy Crow, presi- 
dent; Michael McHale, vice president; 
Butch Poteet, recording secretary. 
Congratulations and good luck. 




You're in 
the Money! 





GET "TOP DOLLAR" FOR 
USED TEXTBOOKS 



University Bookstore 

Wed., Thurs., Fri. 

Dec. 9, 10, 11 
Mon., Tues., Wed. 
Dec. 14, 15, 16 
Hours: 
8:30a.m.-4:00p.m. 





PLAf 

14A 

14B 

14C 

19A 

19B 

19C 

Var. i 

Var I 



By MIC 
Staff Wi 

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FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 



Wednesday, December 9: 

8:00 - 10:30 a.m. 10:00 MWF & Daily 

12:00 - 2:30 p.m Eng 0910, 0920, 

1010,1020 

3:30 - 6:00 p.m 3:00 MWF & Daily 

Thursday, December 10: 

8:00-10:30 a.m 9:30 TR 

12:00 - 2:30 p.m 12:30 TR 

3:30 - 6:00 p.m 3:30 TR , 

Friday, December 11: 

8:00 - 10:30 a.m .9:00 MWF & Daily 

12:00 -2:30 p.m 8:00 TR 

3:30 - 6:00 p.m 2:00 TR 



Saturday, December 12: 

8:00- 10:30 a.m 11:0OTR 

12:00 - 2:30 a.m 12:00 MWF & Daily 

Monday, December 14: 

8:00 - 10:30 a.m ...11:00 MWF & Daily 

12:00 - 2:30 p.m 8:00 MWF & Daily 

3:30 - 6:00 p.m Unscheduled exams 

Tuesday, December 15: 

8:00 - 10:30 a.m 1 :00 MWF & Daily 

12:00 - 2:30 p.m 2:00 MWF & Daily 

3:30 - 6:00 p.m. 4:00 MWF & Daily 



Wednesday, December 16: 
8:00 - 10:30 a.m 



.Unscheduled exams 





N 



CURR 



"ERN STATE UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA 




illlll 



e case 

described in the 
Dnts, is a late- 
GMC or Chevy 

cream stripe on 
iort wheel base, 
me bumper and 
tripping on the 
r has a roll bar 
ark color of the 

t several law en- 
rccoopcratingin 
"We are receiv- 
, the Texas Rang- 
is Parish Sheriffs 
iversity Police," 

t if an individual 
:hat could helpin 
he or she should 
County Sheriffs 
295-8154. 




Come and get 'em . . . ARA meal tickets 



Meal Plans 



PLAN 


BASIC 


BOARDS 


BONUS $ 


TOTAL COST 


14A 


$470 


50 


$0 


$474.70 


14B 


$470 


$50 


$5 


$525.20 


14C 


$470 


$100 


S10 


$575.70 


19A 


$500 


$0 


$0 


$505.00 


198 


$500 


$45 


$5 


$550.45 


19C 


$500 


$90 


$10 


$595.90 


Var. A 


$580 


$0 


SO 


$585.80 


Var. B 


$100 


$0 


$0 


$101.00 



By WANDA HAMILTON 
Staff Writer 

Meal tickets are the basic form 
of payment for food on campus. For 
Northwestern students meal tickets 
are a form of daily bread because 
Many students blow their money. 

Next semester the ARA Food 
Services will offer six board plan 
options and two variable plan options 
for the spring semester. The addi- 
tional four board plans being offered 
will include 'Board Bucks' which may 
be spent in either Itza Pizza Parlor or 
the soon to be remodeled Student 
Union Snack Bar. 

Students will be able to enjoy 
fresh baked pastries once the bakery, 
called Cretels is opened. The bakery 
will offer fresh baked pies, donuts, 
cakes, soft serve yogurt and premium 
ice cream. Another added treat for 



students will be a Deli which will 
specialize in gourmet hamburgers 
with assorted toppings. The grill will 
also offer chicken fried steaks, chicken 
sandwiches, fries and onion rings will 
be available. 

ARA Director Kevin OLeary 
said, 'The salad bar will offer home- 
made soups, along with a wide selec- 
tion of toppings for that perfect 
salad." There will also be an "Easy 
•Go" counter where you can grab a 
prepared deli sandwich, desert, or 
salad. 

ARA is also offering "bonus 
bucks" to students when they pur- 
chase an upscaled board plan. Also, 
all meal tickets will have a 1% sales 
tax. 

Variable A & B mealtickets are 
onlyoffercd to graduate students, and 
commuters. 

The following chart shows the 
plans offered: 




Schedule for NSU's spring 1988 semester 



The Natchitoches Christmas Festival proved to hold enjoyment 
for all. This little boy enjoysa famous Natchitoches Meat Pie 
during the festival. 

activities announced 



By MICHELLE WEEGO 
Staff Writer 

As the fall 1987 semester draws 
to a close, many students are already 
looking forward to the new year, new 
resolutions and a new semester of 
school. 

Like the fall semester, the spring 
1 988 term promises a variety of events 
on Northwestern's campus. In addi- 
tion to regularly scheduled activities 
such as intramurals and Student Ac- 
tivities Board events, the spring term 
will also see a variety of special events 
hosted by Greeks, academic units, 
and clubs and organizations. 



Special holidays scheduled for 
the spring semester are Martin Luther 
King's birthday Jan. 18, Mardi Gras 
February 15-17 and spring break 
March 28 through April 4. 

Beginning Jan. 2, the Lady 
Demons plunge full force into basket- 
ball season with a home game against 
Mississippi College. Soon after on Jan. 
9, the NSU Demon basketball team 
will start their year's run. 

The academic semester begins 
with dorms opening Jan. 10. For those 
hoping to get out of a few classes, 
CLEP tests will be given Jan. 13. 
Advising and registration is set for 



Jan. 12-13 with the first day of classes 
set for Jan. 14. The last day to add a 
class will be Jan. 22. 

February 1988 holds such spe- 
cial treats as Valentine's Day and Leap 
Day. Special events include the Vi- 
enna Choir Boys recital Feb. 10, FBLA 
District Conference Feb. 12, Colleen 
Davis Faculty Recital Feb. 24 and ACT 
testing on the 27th. The last day to 
drop classes will be Feb. 29. 

February also sees the opening 
of the Lady Demon Softball season on 
the 27th with Northwestern facing 
Louisiana Tech. 

March is the busiest month of 



the semester with many campus 
events planned. Events include the 
Geoffery Ballet Co. visiting campus 
March 3, and the Academic Honors' 
Banquet and NSU Wind Ensemble 
both set for March 9. 

The Natchitoches Northwest- 
ern Symphony concert will be held 
March 11, Northwest Louisiana Dis- 
trict Rally March 12, Baptist Student 
Union banquet March 15 and a Jazz 
Ensemble concert March 23. Greek 
Week is set for March 14-19. 

March also marks the middle of 
the term with midterm grades being 
sent out March 9. 



April opens with a concert by 
the Shreveport Symphony on the 
sixth. Other events include NSU 
Concert Choir performance April 14, 
NSU Symphony Band concert April 
25 and the musical 'The Music Man" 
April 28-30. 

For the academic-minded, 
CLEP tests will again be given April 
13, with the ACT test and Louisiana 
State Rally slated for April 16. For the 
not-so-academic-minded, the last day 
to resign from school is April 25. 

The Lady Demon Softball 
Southland Conference Tournament is 
scheduled for April 29-30. 



May marks the final month of 
the spring term. A final Jazz Ensemble 
concert will be held May 2. The SAT 
will be administered on campus May 
7 and the CLEP test on May 18. 

Final exams will take place May 
4-11 with commencement exercises 
scheduled for May 13. Dorms are set 
to close as the se'mester ends May 14. 

With the end of the spring 1988 
semester, Northwestern students can 
begin planning ahead for summer 
employment or summer school. For 
those students completing their de- 
grees, the end of the spring term 
means the beginning of life in the "real 
world." 





"Study buddies" available during finals 



By SONYA R1GAUD 
Staff Writer 

Do finals have you worried 
this semester? Do you need a study 
partner to help you out? Academic 
Support Services will set you up. 

Beginning Tuesday, December 
9, the office of. Academic Support 
Services will hold finals week study 
sessions for all Northwestern and 
Scholars' College students. The study 
sessions will be from 7 p.m. until 9 
p.m. each night and will run through 



Thursday, December 11. Each session 
will take place in 104 Keyser Hall. 

The coordinators for the finals 
week study sessions are Dan Medlin 
and Carmen Diez. 

The sessions are free to all 
interested students. 

According to Medlin, the pur- 
pose of having the sessions is to get 
students together who need study 
partners in a particular subject or 
subjects fortheupcoming final exams. 

Medlin said, "Students should 



take advantage of this and many other 
services that are provided by NSU 
free of charge. This program is only a 
small part of the services that our of- 
fice offers to students year round." 

According to Medlin, if stu- 
dents sign up or call ahead of time the 
staff will be able to let them know 
when others studying the same sub- 
ject will be there. 

To sign up for the sessions, 
students are to go by the office of 
Academic Support Services in 104 



Keyser Hall or call 357-5901. Medlin 
said drop-ins are also welcome. 

"I feel that these group study 
sessions could be a key supplement to 
any student's finals week cramming," 
Medlin said. 



Don't forget to go by the office 
of Academic Support Services in 104 
Keyser Hall Tuesday through Thurs- 
day, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. to find a "study 
buddy". 



Northwestern cafeterias receive renovations 



Damian Dominique paints the KA window during SAB's 
Window Painting Contest. The KA's placed first in the 
competition. 



By LISA DARDEN 
Managing Editor 

Santa and his elves won't be the 
only ones busy during the holidays. 
ARA Food Services has a present of its 
own to deliver to the students of 
Northwestern. 

According to Kevin O'Leary, 
director of ARA, plans to remodel and 
upgrade the appearance of Iberville 
and the Student Union cafeterias have 
been made. 

Work on the Student Union 
cafeteria project began Monday. 
Workers are currently removing pan- 
eling from the walls. 

According to O'Leary, an oak 
chair rail will be placed around the 
Student Union cafeteria wall. The 
chair rail will be three feet from the 
floor. A colored vinyl wall covering 



will be placed above the chair rail. 
Other changes include the removal of 
the old chandeliers from the ceiling. 

OLeary said the most notice- 
able change will be the area where the 
salad bar is currently located. 

"We will build a massive salad 
bar. Behind the salad bar on the wall 
will be a drink station and an Easy Go 
station with pre-packaged sand- 
wiches, yogurt and salads." OLeary 
said. "The Easy Go station will allow 
students to pick up a quick meal with- 
out going through the serving lines." 

In addition to salad, the salad 
bar will also feature two homemade 
soups each day. 

Changes have also been slated 
for inside the serving area. The left 
wall will contain a grill, deli and bak- 
ery. O'Leary said the grill will con- 



tinue to serve hamburgers and will 
add such features as chicken and 
chicken fried steak sandwiches. The 
grill will also expand to offer omelets 
to order for breakfast. 

The deli will feature such items 
as po'boys and various other sand- 
wiches. Gretel's Bakery will offer such 
items as homemade pies, cakes, 
brownies, fudge and cookies. 

The right side of the serving area 
will continue to serve meals and 
house the drink station. Daily cafe 
features include two entrees per meal. 
Awnings will be built over the cafe 
and drink stations. 

OLeary said the project is being 
completed by Fixtur-World of 
Cookeville, Tenn. The Student Union 
cafeteria project is set at 565,000. 
O'Leary said Itza Pizza, which 



opened in November, cost ARA about 
$30,000. 

OLeary said the Student Union 
project should be complete by the end 
of January. 

According to OLeary, plans to 
update and remodel Iberville Dining 
Hall are currently being proposed to 
the university. Iberville plans include 
the construction of a Y-shaped salad 
bar featuring salad and hot desserts. 
Dividers will also be constructed to 
break up the large open space in the 
dining hall. 

OLeary said the proposed Iber- 
ville plan is set at $100,000. 

The remodeling of the two 
campus cafeterias is part of the con- 
tract between Northwestern and 
ARA. O'Leary said ARA must spend 
$200,000 in improvements on thecafe- 
terias. 



1 



Page 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



uecemoer 8, 1987 

1. oec< 



NEWS 4r^^«=*$H^^ J 

B 



Wrapping up the Demons' season 



By CHRIS HUNT 
Staff Writer 

The NSU Demon football sea- 
son has been over for a few weeks 
now. The Demon players are reading 
headlines about the NCAA division I- 
AA playoffs. A few weekends ago, 
Arkansas State defeated Jackson State 
in the first round of the above men- 
tioned playoffs, two teams that 
Northwestern defeated. 

That just goes to illustrate the 
roller coaster season that the Demons 
experienced. Demon coach Sam 
Goodwin had his own way of describ- 



ing the bizarre season he and his team 
went through. "The season was kind 
of up and down. We had some high 
points and some low point's. We 
played some great football at times." 

Yes, at times. At other times, 
however, the Demons were down- 
right embarrassing. 

Sure, they had a winning season 
at 6-5 and they beat some top teams, 
but the mighty Demon with his hell- 
ish horns and his long forked tail was 
not beyond a humiliating moment. 

How about the game against 



North Texas State? The Demons had 
the Eagles on the ropes only to be 
stung with a knock-out punch in the 
last few seconds. 



And what about 
against Northeast 



the thriller 
Louisiana? 

Thriller? The Demons snatched defeat 
from the jaws of victory when a "Hail 
Mary" pass deflated the already flut- 
tering hopes for the playoffs. 

The State Fair game rolled 
around and Demon fans rejoiced. 
They might actually celebrate a vic- 
tory over long time rival Louisiana 



Tech. Ah, but alas, the mighty Demon 
with the hellish horns limped out of 
Independence Stadium with his long 
forked tail tucked between his legs as 
the Bulldogs were more like a pack of 
hyenas dousing the hopes of a North- 
western blowout. 

This was the straw that broke 
the camel's back. The Demons, both 
defeated and embarrassed, dropped 
two more games to USL and Sam 
Houston State. The USL game was 
lost by turnovers if it was lost at all. 

Sam Houston just plain beat the 
. harassed Demons. 



YOU HAVE ALWAYS WANTED TO LEARN 

SCUBA DIVING 

PE 1020 - ADVANCED 
PE 1330 -OPEN WATER 

Learn to scuba and earn college credit 
Classes taught by 
ADVENTURE SPORTS of Shreveport, La. 



Writer gives Christmas gift advice 



By DAN MEDLIN 
Staff Writer 

Save this edition of the Current 
Sauce. You may want to take this copy 
home with you for Christmas because 
it is better than a gift list. It is proof that 
the gifts you want can exist beneath 
your Christmas tree on Dec. 25th. 

During the last week I have 
informally polled students at North- 
western and determined the most 
popular gifts of 1987. The trend for 
college students this year seems to be 
tools of the trade. 

Electric, fully functional type- 
writers are in high demand. Students 
are realizing the efficiency of the 
printed word and typewriters are 
becoming much easier to use; espe- 
cially for those of us who hunt and 
peck. Parents reading this article 
shouldn't fret because a good electric 
typewriter can be purchased for your 
eager knowledge seeker for under 
$160.00. 



Most of the juniors and seniors 
I surveyed are requesting briefcases 
as one of the top items on their Christ- 
mas lists. Apparently, upperclassmen 
are as eager to look professional as 
they are learning to become. A brief- 
case is an appropriate gift for a male or 
a female and can be purchased for 
under S60. 

Of course, the usual requests 
like a new car and a trip to the Baha- 
mas arose, but when practicality 
comes knocking, a nice 10 speed bike 
might be a good suggestion. Parents 
can satisfy their children's traveling 
needs for under $200. 

Students, be advised to expect 
the usual gifts again this Christmas 
from all your relatives. From a short 
but interesting survey taken Saturday 
at the Festival, I ascertained that 
clothes and money will top the list 
again as gifvs given to college students 
from their relatives. 
A final suggestion to parents for a gift 



Students at Northwestern are giving idea might be a subscription to 



also asking for one of the many differ- 
ent computers available on the 
marker. For students lucky enough to 
already own a computer, software 
packages are on the top of the list. 
Again, parents should be aware that 
the cost of computer software is also 
steadily decreasing; 



a magazine, but please, no heavy 
reading. We get enough of that al- 
ready. 

Some fellow students were 
worried over the gift giving dilemma 
as well as the gift receiving dilemma. 
Probably the biggest worry on their 
mind s was what to give a boyfriend or 



girlfriend. I am not an expert in this 
field but may have some adequate 
suggestions. 

First, assess the degree of your 
relationship and then the impact you 
wish the gift to have. Of course, how 
much money you have will also make 
a big difference. If your relationship 
has been progressing well but you 
don't want to make too big of a state- 
ment, you may try something practi- 
cal like a sweater. 

Most people assume that big 
statements are made with big money. 
Therefore they are making those 
statements with gifts like expensive 
watches (e.g. Gucci) or other items of 
jewelry. 

Believe it or not, however, a 
lot can be expressed for a little amount 
of money. The top suggestion from 
my survey seems to be a pet, such as a 
kitten or a puppy. With this choice, I 
don't recommend pet stores, where 
you're likely to spend as much as you 
would for an engagement ring. How- 
ever, for no more than $10 and a little 
effort, you can adopt a homeless pet 
from the local animal shelter. 

The next top suggestion on the 
non-materialistic list is a nice, emo- 
tional poem. If you have just enough 
writing creativity and deep feelings 
for someone, you should be able to 



construct a masterpiece. Then take the 
masterpiece, type it up or write it in 
calligraphy and frame it. The poem 
can make a most appropriate gift. 

For the benefit of those who 
have young nieces, nephews or chil- 
dren, I conducted one last little survey 
of what the young ones want for 
Christmas this year. It seems that chil- 
dren are just as toy crazy as they've 
ever been. Children are more influ- 
enced by what they see on T.V. The 
toys that are endorsed by their own 
cartoon show are the ones children 
call for by name. Examples are G.I. Joe 




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and Jem dolls. When shopping tor a |^ iv» m«i» «*»».™ n i« .jj « -* (m ^ 

young relative, the key to remember is """ ""™ """ "~ ' "*™ """" """ "* ** 



Editor 

E 

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they want what they see on T.V. 

Finally, you might consider 
what you should give your parents 
and other relatives. A winning sug- 
gestion was offered to me by a pho- 
tographer — portraits of yourself. 
Time is running short for this sugges- 
tion since developing takes longer for 
quality portraits. However, the cost is 
relatively low considering that you 
can kill many gift givings with one 
portrait package. 

I hope these gift giving and 
receiving ideas are helpful to you with 
the coming holidays. Have a very 
merry Christmas, send Mom and Dad 
my love, and I'll see you next 
semester. 



......... 



.....»:•.. 








Including tax 




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By LISA [ 

Dear San 
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Northwe: 
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GET "TOP DOLLAR" FOR 
USED TEXTBOOKS 



University Bookstore 

Wed., Thurs., Fri. 

Dec. 9, 10, 11 
Mon., Tues., Wed. 
Dec. 14, 15, 16 
Hours: 
8:30a.m.-4:00p.m. 





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some gro 
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8 ' my pecember8, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



N 



It's a tough job . . . 

But someone has to do it 



By GREG KENDRICK 
: Editor 

Before we pass the final judge- 
ment, before we open the sacred book 
\ ( societal norms and label this 
iperson's actions as "the big no-no," 
^before we stake our sports informa- 
tion director to the ant hill and apply 
[the syrup, before we do any of this 
-maybe the individuals who consider 
jthe 1987-88 Lady Demon Media 
•Guide sexist and offensive, should sit 
jdown and contemplate why the job of 
sports information director exists at 
^universities. 

At first the Lady Demon media 
guide appears harmless. So the bas- 
I lcetball players are posing on the front 
I cover donned in cute little bunny ears 
j and fluffy tails. There is no provoca- 
| tive posing, no overly exposed bod- 
I ies — unless one is convinced that the 
perfect honeymoon teddy is a basket- 
l ball uniform. 

OK, let's move to the forum. 
Here's a statement about Head Coach 
t| James Smith that reads, "if he (Smith) 
I wasn't married to a stunning wife and 
| father to an equally beautiful 
• ' daughter, one could easily envision 
■i the personable 39 year old stretched 
| out on a chaise lounge surrounded by 
fsi bikini-clad babes, grapes in hands." Is 
j the room getting warmer yet? It 
shouldn't be. I'm glad they took 
I enough precaution to mention 
I Smith's stunning wife and beautiful 
| daughter so he would n't be greeted at 
| home by a cast iron cooking projectile. 
So far the contents of this book 
are so carefully worded and non- 
offensive that a Baptist minister could 
use it in his resume, or better yet, that 
t O a universitv president with deeply 
* " religious conservative views would 
approve the major sports endeavor 
without a second thought. 

Whoops! Here's a centerfold in 
ImM the middle of the media guide. That 
' Ol 1 I may produce some heavy implica- 
tions. Whew! it just shows a typical 
O team roster poster. But as one flips 

over to the backside of the fold out, 
one finds some interesting statistics 



rs 



concerning a specified team average: 
"Bust: 36, Waist: 24, Hips: Yes." Per- 
haps the most important information 
a sports commentator turns to when 
"sizing" up the teams. 

And now the final blow. Hold 
on to your knitting needles and Bible 
granny. All self-righteous belles and 
feminist ex-jocks better go grab your 
.357 magnums, because now 
Northwestem's Prather Coliseum is 
"The Lady Demon Pleasure Palace." 
A steaming brothel of wooden floor, 
Plexiglas backboards and (gulp) fold- 
ing bleachers. 

It is too late to call back the 
shot. The offense has been made and 
the public has reacted and voiced 
their opinion at the national level. 
Iwon't deny it, some of the material in 
the 1987-88 Lady Demon Media 
Guide is offensive and sexist. That is 
why this media guide is so effective. 

Tom Wancho may take a lot of 
flack for his actions. But all I can say is 
that he does his job and he does it well. 

Wancho is following a prin- 
ciple that has been passed down 
through generations of Louisiana 
public figures: bad publicity is better 
than no publicity. 

Do you think it is not effective? 
Do you call having Northwestem's 
name splashed all over the pages of 
USA Today and all four of the major 
newspapers in Louisiana non-public- 
ity? Wancho achieved this same na- 
tional news coverage last year by 
having the rather bizarre theme of 
"resurrection" attached to the men's 
basketball team. The cover photo 
showed Northwestern men's basket- 
ball team members posed on top of 
headstones in a cemetery. This media 
guide achieved a story in Sports Illus- 
trated. 

My point is this: any individ- 
ual who understands how the media 
in this country has the capability of 
producing name recognition over- 
night for any sports institution and 
believes that the end will justify the 
means deserves the job as sports infor- 
mation director. Tom Wancho has 
earned his job. 




Whtn Wi semen Go Aw 



Peace asked for student's memory 



Dear Editor, 

Barely three weeks ago the late 
Teresa "Terri" Cazalas wrote an edi- 
torial asking for a cease-fire between 
Scholars' College and NSU students. 



Miss Cazalas is now dead; all 
hopes, aspirations, dreams, illusions, 
all her lifelong efforts, her parents' 
hopes and efforts, all truncated in the 
prime of life. Her radiant smile and 
beauty shall be no more. Of her image 
only photographs remain, which shall 
soon enough be left all alone in some 
dark corner gathering dust. Only the 
gracious memories, which those of us 
who chanced to meet her during her 
brief interlude through life, shall ever 
remain. 



Last Thursday night, her last on 
this earth, she sat all alone, fairly close 
to me, during choir practice. I was 
completely absorbed with my own 
concerns, yet noticed her loneliness 
amidst the hubbub of the choir mem- 
bers who moved about during a 
break. I felt compelled to move to- 
ward her and relieve that loneliness, 
yet alas, such was the priority of my 
"perceived" concerns that I dismissed 
the occasion: "After all, I'll see her 
next week," I told myself. . . There was 
no next week. No next night cither, for 
she departed from this life next morn- 
ing and I shall forever remain guilty at 
my soul for not approaching her then. 

Let this be a lesson for all of us. 
Death may knock at the door of any 



one of us at any time. Life, even at the 
maximum splendor of youth and 
beauty, barely hangs from a thread 
and may easily be snuffed out. Let us 
have a "human" touch with those that 
surround us; tomorrow may be too 
late. Let us be in peace with ourselves, 
our neighbors, family and God. Let us 
remember that we are not immortal. 
Let's drive safely. And finally, let us 
bury the hatchet of NSU/Scholars' 
College rivalry. After all, we com- 
monly grieve. 

David V. Miller 



77iis letter was written a week 
after the death of Teresa Cazales who died 
in a car crash on Friday, November 73, 
1987. 



q.. Christmas wish list covers campus 'naughty & nice' 



By LISA DARDEN 
^p^^-Jb Managing Editor 

Dear Santa Claus, 

With the increase in 
Northwestem's enrollment and the 
large number of students on campus 
this year, I thought you might need a 
little help in making a list and check- 
ing it twice. Sooo, I've devised a list of 
recommendations of the naughty and 
the nice at Northwestern. 




dorms, and those who vandalize 
school and others' property. 

Don't get me wrong Santa. Not 
all Northwestern students are bad. 
We have plenty of good folks at 
Northwestern who deserve a stocking 
stuffed with goodies. These names are 
probably at the top of your "nice" list. 
For example, Rachel Heider, Brother 
Dave DeCuir, Andrea Madison, 
Shwu Fen Lee, Arthur "Sushi 
Stephens" Luck, Angela LaCour, 
Marti Elkins and Dennis Holmes. 

To assist you even more, Mr. 
Santa, I have devised a specific list of 
gifts for special groups and individu- 
als at Northwestern: 

- For the SAB, a rice-proof pro- 
jector and snake bite kit for Halloween 
movie sessions. 

- For the Student Council-ex- 
cuse me I meant SG A-,an uncontested 
election. 

- For Paula, a can of OFF to 
'rash down on campus, guys who keep the "moskeeters" away. 

driv by in cars with the music throb- - For Brad Bates, a real party 

°jng and yelling obscenities at girls, wagon (he's a single man in a family 
those who pull false fire alarms in the car). 



First of all I'm going to name 
some groups of people who don't 
deserve anything in your sleigh ex- 
cept what Rudolph might leave be- 
hind. These people have managed 
one way or another to make others' 
stay at Northwestern unpleasant. I'm 
sure you'll agree that these folks don't 
even deserve the bag the switches 
come in. 

The toppers on the "naughty" 
list include those students who throw 



• For Dr. Donald Gates, his very 
own personalized and individual 
parking spot at the biology building. 

- For Billy St. Andre, a lie detec- 
tor so he can test Current Sauce report- 
ers to ensure that they spread no more 
lies (imagine that). 

- For Current Sauce reporters, a 
tape recorder to take to interview ses- 
sions with people like Billy St. Andre 
(that way you can record your own 
lies for later use). 

-For John Stephens, a neck and 
a Miss Manners book. 

- For Marjorie Poss, a pair of 
rose-colored glasses and a suitcase. 

- For Mike Mason, a new bath- 
robe, a brand new pair of gold Army 
boots and a new hat. 

- For Michelle Weego, first 
place for most creative news stories. 

- For Michele Broomfield, an- 
other "1" for her name. 

- For Scott McLaughlin, a fish- 
ing partner to accompany him this 
spring in his new boat (he likes bass). 

- For the canoe shed, a set of 
safety guidelines by the spring. 



-For Wanda Hamilton, a red- 
neck twang and a love of country 
music for her new job. 

- For SPA, a membership count 
almost as big as the honorary mem- 
bership list. 

- For "coach" Randy Willis, a 
shiny new coaching whistle. 

- For Tom Wancho, a year's 
subscription to Playboy (I loved the 
media guide). 

- For the Admissions and Re- 
cruiting office, ugly (or at least 
average-looking) student workers. 

- ForSonya Rigaud, a Popeye's 
restaurant to satisfy her appetite for 
chicken. 

- For the dormitory domino 
players, padded tables to muffle the 
noise. 

- For Greg Kendrick, a box of 
crayons so he can practice another 
color of journalism instead of yellow. 

- For Elise, Loree and Jo, 
enough good gossip and snacks to last 
a month of Sundays. 

- For Richard, an electric blan- 
ket to keep him warm until I come 



home from publication night. 

As you can see Santa, there arc 
lots of gifts to give at Northwestern. I 
hope this list helps you out for your 
trip to Natchitoches. 



Oh, you might want to include 
a present for University Police. They 
get my "making the best of a bad 
situation award." They took a bumpy 
parking lot full of pot holes and con- 
struction pocks and fixed it up with 
one simple sign: "Speed bumps 
ahead." So Santa, when you drive 
your sleigh through the parking lot 
past Kyscr and behind Williamson 
Hall, watch out for the camoflougcd 
speed bumps — you might lose a few 
pretty packages. 

Merry Christmas to you Santa 
(and to all of my faithful and fearful 
readers. Take heart — this is my last 
editorial as managing editor. Sonya 
Rigaud will take over the task next 
semester.) 

See ya' next semester. 



Parent remembers daughter; thanks NSU students, staff 

rw..r... 




°ear Editor, 

Ever since the birth of Teresa in 
19 69 and with the subsequent births 
of Jennifer in 1971, Bethany in 1976 
<" n d Johathan in 1978, Nancy and I 
nave always had one sincere and fer- 
ment and constant prayer — to never 
h ave to face the death of one of our 
children. Accepting the death of any- 
°ne you love can be very difficult, but 
*e thought the death of a child would 
devastating, even debilitating. 
I have never really understood 
wh y children must die. When people 
w e knew lost a child, I could never 
gather the strength to go to the wake, 
toneral, or even say anything to the 
Parents and family. This has hap- 
P^ed many times, and I ask under- 
standing from those I may have hurt 
v my absence in their time of need. 

But we have now had to face 
£ e death of a child, a tragic death, a 
r eak death according to the state 
P 0l 'ce and Natchitoches Parish 
goner's Office; in an automobile 
S 0l ng so slowly that her external inju- 
rs were only superficial, and almost 
fe ^-existent; there were no broken 
c ° ne s, no fractures, no cuts, only a 
° u ple of small scrapes and bruises. 
. We have now had to face the 
jath of a child who had always been 

"ght to excel, but to be herself, to be 
j^itive, to be happy and to make 
ei* happy. She was listed in Who's 
Stun Amon S American High School 

"dents, a member of the National 
Cl, K° r Societ y' the National Beta 

«?. Mu Alpha Theta, Medical Ex- 
LJ ers ' and" m any, many more. She 
gj^^n^idered to be among the top 



students in the entire state of Louisi 
ana. She always wanted to be a doctor 
and because she so loved children, 
talked about being a pediatrician. One 
of her friends wrote her at her funeral, 
"I know you're with God, He needed 
a great doctor for all the babies in 
heaven, and He told me you're just 
fine and that you will be happy for- 
ever." 

The very last line Teri wrote on 
her application to Louisiana School 
(when she was only 15 years old) was 
in response to the question: "If se- 
lected, how will your presence add 
quality to the student body of 
LSMSA?" Teresa's response ended 
with "... I am sure that I will be 
touched by many different people. I 
would also hope that I would touch 
the lives of others by my caring atti- 
tude and love for others." 

She did care for and love oth- 
ers, and that helps us to accept her 
sudden death. She was always happy 
and that helps us to accept her death. 
We have no regrets for the way we 
raised her — no unfinished business, 
no unsaid words, no undone deeds — 
and that helps us to accept her death. 
She was very religious — she had with 
her at the time of her death two rosa- 
ries, her small Bible and the small 
prayer book, her scapular and neck- 
lace and necklace cross — and that 
helps us accept her death. She was 
prepared to meet God face to face, as 
she always seemed to be prepared for 
life. 

She was truly an outstanding 
and distinct person and we thank God 
for our 18 years with her. At St. John 



Memorial Gardens, the day after the 
funeral, we read all of the grave mak- 
ers and we saw many, many children 
younger than Teresa. We realized 
then how much God must have loved 
us to give her to us for those 18 years. 

But there is much more we are 
now thankful for. We were natives of 
Mobile, Ala. We have lived in Illinois, 
Delaware and New York before 
moving to LaPlace nine years ago. 
During those 18 years we always 
called Alabama home. 

But Teresa's life and death 
taught us something. The wonderful 
people of LaPlace and Natchitoches 
taught us something. Our home isn't 
in Alabama. It is LaPlace, La. For the 
first time since leaving Alabama, I can 
say that Mobile is no longer my home. 
Louisiana is our home and for the past 
two and a half years, Teresa has called 
Natchitoches home and it has been 
like a second home to us. The people 
of Natchitoches have been wonderful 
to Teresa and us. 

We have much to be thankful 
for this Thanksgiving 1987: 

For my uncle, Monsignor Her- 
man (Fr. Pete) Cazalas, a priest for 54 
years, who taught me so many things, 
but especially for instilling in me the 
attitude of his motto: "For all that has 
been— thanks; for all that will be — 
yes." 

The teachers Nancy and I have 
had, especially the brothers of the 
Sacred Heart at McGill in Mobile, by 
helping me to realize that our God is a 
God of love, that for everything there 
is a reason, that for every pain there is 
a joy. 



Fr. Monsillo, for his presence 
and support all afternoon and eve- 
ning Friday and his celebration of the 
funeral mass and burial, and Father 
Bob Cooper for the beautiful liturgy. 

St. Joan of Arc and Ascension 
of Our Lord Choirs for the beautiful 
singing and Melanie and Irene for the 
music. 

God, who entrusted us with all 
our children and for letting us have 
Teresa for 18 beautiful years. 

All who have touched Teresa 
during her life, helping her to become 
the superstar she truly was. 

My parents, Ben and Joelane, 
and Nancy's parents, Irma and Ross, 
for raising us to be able to face the joys 
as well as the difficulties of life. 

The State Police, for escorting 
the Northwestern bus and other ve- 
hicles from Natchitoches to St. John 
Parish and back through closed high- 
ways during a treacherous storm 
Monday. 

The many students from 
Northwestern and Scholars' College 
who braved that storm to be with 
Teresa and us, students too numerous 
to mention. 

The countless others who were 
with us in their prayers and thoughts. 

Denise and Paula, LSMSA 
R.A.'s who drove down alone to be 
With Jennifer. 

For Sherrif Johnson and Cap- 
tain Burt Ory and their men for escort- 
ing the bus, funeral processions and 
providing dinner for all of the travel- 
ers. 

The Knights of Columbus and 
Jaycecs, for immeasurable support 



and help, and providing a place, and a 
meal, for all travelers, and especially 
the people from Natchitoches, during 
the terrible storm Monday evening. 

Roland Clement, and his men, 
who braved that storm to see Teresa 
to her final resting place because they 
knew I wished her to be buried in the 
ground that same day. 

Dr. Alost, president of North- 
western, for his belief in Teresa, and 
his beautiful words at the funeral 
mass; Dr. Don Barker, Dr. Ballenger 
and Mr. Boutte for so, so many things. 
And the other faculty and staff of 
Northwestern and Louisiana Schol- 
ars' College. 

Nelson Guidry, Jimmy 
Guidry, and Maurice Aucoin for eve- 
rything they did to help us through, 
and to make Teresa look like a sleep- 
ing beauty. 

Deacon Frank Hernandez for 
assisting at the funeral mass, and 
Deacon Joe Peltier for telling Jennifer 
about Teresa's death and safely driv- 
ing her to LaPlace that night. 

The people of St. Joan of Arc 
Parish, for letting us use a truly beau- 
tiful church. 

My wife Nancy, our daughters 
Jennifer and Bethany, and our son 
Jonathan for the love and closeness 
we share as a family. 

Teresa, who lit up our lives, 
who was never afraid to be different, 
to be distinct, to try to be the best. 

All who attended the mass in 



See letter page 4 



CURRENT SAUCF 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 



USA DARDEN 

Managing Editor 



KIRK COPEIAND 

Sports Editor 



MICHELE BROOMFIELD 
DAMATIA GIPSON 
WANDA HAMILTON 
CHRIS HUNT 
DAN MEDLIN 
SONYA RIGAUD 
MICHELLE WEEGO 
Staff Writers 



ALLEN EVANS 

Advertising Manager 



EDD LEE 

Circulation/Distribution 



EVAN TAYLOR 

Cartoonist 



WILLIAM FRANCO 
TEDRIS SMITH 

Photographers 

TOM WHITEHEAD 

Adviser 



The Current Sauce is 
published weekly during the fall 
and spring semesters by the stu- 
dents of Northwestern State Uni- 
versity of Louisiana. It is nor asso- 
ciated with any of the 
University's departments and is 
financed independently. 

The Current Sauce is 
based in the Office of Student 
Publications located in Kyser 
Hall. The office of the editorial 
staff is 225H. telephone (318) 
357-6466. The adviser's office is 
103 Kyser Hall, telephone 357- 
5213. 

The mailing address for 
the Current Sauce is P.O. Box 
5306, NSU, Natchitoches LA 
71497. 

All correspondence, in- 
cluding letters to the editor is 
welcome. Materiol submitted 
for consideration must be 
mailed to above address or 
brought to the office. 

The deadline for all ad- 
vertising and copy is Friday by 3 
p.m. Inclusion of any and all 
material is left to the discretion of 
the editor. 

letters to the editor 
should be typed (double- 
spaced) signed, and should in- 
clude a telephone number 
where the writer can be 
reached. No anonymous letters 
will be printed. 

Current sauce subscrip- 
tion rates are S 1 1 per academic 
year (27 issues) or S6 per 
semester (14 issues). The paper is 
entered as second-class mail at 
Natchitoches. LA. The USPS 
number is 140-660 



1 



Page 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



December 8, 1987 



CAMPUS LINE '^^-^r^^-^-^ frvfrvfo; 5«»4M»»-fc%-frni fr \ > \ frvVk fo ^r^for^Rr^^^ >* -j»^4MMHrK-K->qrH| | 



One-man show 

Damian Dominique, a 
Louisiana Scholar's College fresh- 
man will have five watcrcolor 
paintings on birdlife displayed 
through dec. 11 at the First Bank of 
Natchitoches and Trust Company. 

Dominique, who has only 
been painting since June, recently 
exhibited a collection of his work at 
the Lafayette Art Gallery. He is also 
in the process of having limited- 
editionprints produced from some 
of his watercolor paintings. The 
exhibit may be viewed Monday 
through Friday during regular 
banking hours. 



Taxes 

Northwestern students who 
are recipients of scholarships and fel- 
lowships may have to pay taxes. 
Amounts granted after August 16, 
1986 for expenses incurred on or after 
Janurary 1, 1987 are taxable income, if 
the aggregate scholarship or fellow- 
ship amounts recieved by the recipi- 
ent exceed tuition and fees (not in- 
cluding room and board) required for 
enrollment or attendance at the edu- 
cational institution and fees, books, 
supplies and equipment required for 
coursesof instruction. If you have any 
questions concerning this action 
please contact Mr. Bob Gaddis, Con- 
troller or Terry Faust, Director of 
Financial Aid in Roy Hall. 



KNWD 

Students interested in becom- 
ing a DJ for KNWD are invited to 
attend a meeting Monday, Janurary 
11, 1988, at 6:30 p.m. in South Hall. 
South Hall will be the new home of 
KNWD. 



Argus 

The winners of the Argus Po- 
etry and Fiction Contest have been 
announced. Dr. Norman German, Dr. 
Lynda Boren and Mr. Jack Bedell 
judged the entries, which were sub- 
mitted anonymously. 

In poetry, Leslie Gregory 
placed first, Chandel Hesselgrove, 
second and Adrienne Dezendorf, 
third. Five unranked honarable men- 
tions were awarded to Kristine Coreil, 
Ellen Dollar, Gynger Ingram (two 
awards) and Chris Wilcox. 

Three cash prizes were 
awarded in fiction. Dan Forrest 
placed first, Lisa Darden, second and 
Ami Jernegan, third. The unranked 
honorable mentions for fiction are 
Reinaldo Barnes, Greg Burkhead, 
Kristine Coreil and Stanley Rice. 

LOB 

Any young woman wishing to 
participate in the Miss Lady of the 
Bracelet Pageant must meet the fol- 
lowing criteria: 

1. Must have a 2.0 minimum 
gpa and must be a full-time student at 
the time of the pageant. 

2. Must be in satisfactory aca- 
demic and disciplinary standing. Stu- 
dents on academic probation or ap- 
peals are not eligible. 

3. Must be considered by fel- 
low students and faculty as being a 
good citizen in the community, and as 
having contributed to NSU by her 
presence. 

4. Must be single, never having 
been married, and relinquish her title 
if she marries during the year of her 
reign. 

5. Any girl graduating at the 
end of the spring semester will not be 
eligible to compete. 

Anyone wishing to participate 
in the pageant should go by Room 21 4 
in the Student Union. 



Woodworking 

An evening woodworking 
course will be offered during the 1987 
spring semester by Northwestern's 
Department of Industrial Technol- 
ogy. Classes, taught by Jim Hart, will 
meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays 
from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. in the Depart- 
ment of Industrial Technology's 
woods laboratory. Covered in the 
course are advanced hand skills, 
operation of woodworking equip- 
ment, care and shaipening of tools 
and technological developments in 
the wood industry. The registration 
fee is $155 plus a $5 application fee. 
For further information, call the NSU 
Department of Industrial Technology 
at 357-4465 or 357-5298. 



Phi Kappa Phi 

Twenty Northwestern juniors 
and seniors will be initiated Dec. 8 at 
11 a.m. in room 320 of the Student 
Union into Northwestern's chapter of 
the National Honor Society of Phi 
Kappa Phi. 

To be eligible for membership 
in Phi Kappa Phi, second semester 
juniors must have maintained a 3.6 or 
better academic grade point average 
and seniors must have at least a 3.5 or 
better average. 

Northwestern students who 
will be initiated into Phi Kappa Phi 
are: Caprice Marie Brown, senior, 
English major, Napoleonville; Bonnie 
Gilcrease Buckelew, senio, eleman- 
tary education, Winnfield; Anne S. 
Cox, junior, special education-mild 
and moderate elementary education 
dual certification, Winnfield; Jerry 
Alan Creamer, senior, business ad- 
ministration, Campti; Cheryl Kaye 
Creed, senior accounting, Shirley, 
Mass.; Kimberly L. Green, senior, 
business education and accounting, 
Many; Sarita Walker home, senior, 
elementary teaching, Atlanta; Jean- 
ette Jolly Hyles, senior, social science 
education, Zwolle; Gynger L. Ingram, 
junior, English and creative writing, 
Shreveport; Karen Harwell Powell, 
senior, accounting, Coushatta; 
Glenda J. Prewitt, senior, special edu- 
cation-mild and moderate elemen- 
tary dual certification, Hornbeck; 
Regina Bruce Prewitt, senior, elemen- 
tary teaching, Natchitoches. 

Gail E. Rainowitz, junior, nurs- 
ing, Shreveport; Louise A. Richey, 
senior, elementary teaching, Otis; 
Linda A. Rigsby, senior, psychology 
and elementary education, Baton 
Rouge; Cathy Ann Smith, senior, ac- 
counting, Natchitoches; Tammy Den- 
ise Weaver, junior, business admini- 
stration, Winnfield; Patricia A. Wil- 
liams, senior, business administra- 
tion, Lecompte; Angela Michelle 
Womack, senior, elementary teach- 
ing, Winnfield. 



"Music Man" Auditions 

Northwestern's Department 
of Music and Theatre Arts has an- 
nounced that open auditions will be 
conducted Tuesday and Wednesday, 
December 8-9 to select the cast for the 
1988 spring production of 'The Music 
Man." The presentation, scheduled 
for April 28-30, has roles available for 
1 6 men, 8 boys, 1 4 women, 1 1 girls and 
numerous extras open to all Nortkf 
western students and talented indi- 
viduals from Natchitoches and sur- 
rounding area. Prospective cast 
members will be required to partici- 
pate in the reading, singing and danc- 
ing auditions. The auditions, which 
will be held in the A.A. Fredericks 
Creative and Performing Arts Center, 
will be as follows: Tuesday — 4 p.m. 
reading, 5 p.m. singing and 6 p.m. 
dancing; Wednesday-4 p.m. singing, 
5 p.m. reading and 6 p.m . dancing. For 
further information, contact the De- 
partment of Music and Theater Arts at 
357-4522. 

Legal Assistant Program 

NSU's Department of History, 
Social Sciences and Social Work has 
announced two courses which will be 
offered during the 1988 spring 
semester in the Legal Assistant Pro- 
gram. "Estates, Trusts and Wills," a 
course which focuses on the prepara- 
tion of legal documents will be offered 
on Tuesdays. The second course, to be 
taught on Thursdays, is "Family Rela- 
tions Law," which will cover the 
preparation of documents, knowl- 
edge of procedure and other matters 
related to domestic relations law. 
Both classes are at 6 p.m. in Kyser 
Hall. Registration is $155 for one 
course and $300.25 for two courses. 
For more information, please write 
Dr. Maxine Taylor, Chairman of the 
Department of History, Social Sci- 
ences and Social Work, NSU, Natchi- 
toches, LA 71497 or call 357-6195. 



Letter continued 
from page 3 



r 



Natchitoches Friday night, and the 
people of Natchitoches, and espe- 
cially the students and faculty and 
staff of Louisiana School, Northwest- 
ern, and Scholars' College for their 
prayers and support. 

Jack and Ann Brittain for being 
Teresa's host parents for two years, 
and Deacon Joe and Bobbie Peltier for 
their love and help during Teresa's 
time in Natchitoches. 

Jennifer Hillis, whose letter of 
love to Teresa moved me to provide a 
bookat the funeral home for friends to 
leave messages, some too beautiful 
for words. 

For all who left a message to 
Teresa. These messages confirm to us 
that she did indeed touch the lives of 
many people. 

The students of LSMSA for 

their constant support for Jennifer, 
with their hours-long long distance 
phone calls. 

For Air Supply, who gave us 
one of Teresa's favorite songs which I 
think of everytime I think of her: 
"Everytime I see you all the rays of the 
sun go streaming through the waves 
of your hair. And every star in the sky 
is taking aim at your eyes like a spot- 
light. 

The beating of my heart is a 
drum and it's lost and it's looking for 
a rhythm like you. You can take the 
darkness from the pit of the night. 
And turn it to a beacon making every- 
thing bright." 

For all these things, we are 
thankful. Teresa, we love you. 
Pete, Nancy, Jennifer, Bethany and 
Jonathon Cazales 
LaPlace, La. 



WE WORK AS 
LATE AS YOU DO 



•rap 



if 



Whenever you need clear, quality copies, come to 
Kinko's. We're open early, open late, and open 
weekends. 

When you're working late, it's good to know you're not 
working alone. 



kinkes 



OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 

7AM- 10PM MON-FRI 

9AM - 5PM SAT -SUN 

621 BOSSIER 
352-8185 



N< 



Merry Christmas! 

Twas the night before deadline, and ail through the office 
Everyone was asking, "Would the SGA scoff us?" 
"Would Tommy approve?" "Where's the cartoon with the fighters?" 

"Are we short on campus line?" "Do we need more staff writers?" 

Anyone interested in writing for the 
Current Sauce please fill out an application 
in room 225 Kyser Hall by January 19, 1988 

or call the Sauce Office at 357-5456. 



COUNTRY BOUTIQUE 

Where You'll Step Out In Fashion 
Ladies' Apparel & Accessaries 
Discount Prices 
Free Gift Wrapping With Purchase 
Open Mon.-Sat. 10a.m. -7p.m. 
Sun. lp.m.-5p.m. 
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Sti 

y LISA D, 
jews Edil 

Al 
ity Bo( 
Jorthwesi 

Wri 
Jorthwesi 
oicestwo 
lore buys 
slOpercf 
alueand i 
iiirchased 
ijovided 
ion. 

The 
ulating th 
iney, a ju 
oganspor 
or jourm 
Vayne, In< 
"W« 
ookstore 
ey said. ' 
omplainir 
ling abou 
Ace 
00 studen 
s of Friday 
^ined by c 
nd standii 
foepetitioi 
^st Wedne 
Date 
ion is addi 
dost and 
ookstore, 
v'aliace B 
infair to th 
jrn policy 
ave very 
jtudents a: 
looks are \ 
jtudents ha 
liercent of 



ALVIN DE3LIEUX, K.PH. 



BOBBY WAGGONER, R.PH 




UNIVERSITY PH ARM ACT 
AND GIFTS 



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All NSU imp. merch. 1/2 off!! 
Dec. 9 - Dec. 18! 

Merry Christmas! 



■ 



University Bookstore 
Student Union 




ITZARRIVED 

ITZAMAZING 
ITZAPPETIZING 
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ITZAWESOME 
I TZ AVAIL ABLE 

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mm 



Funny Name 




Great Pizza 



V GREG KE 
dltor 

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elt ' the nev 
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Stan ( 
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"YIICHELLI 
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8. 1987 




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Students circulate petition against bookstore buy-back practice 



re not 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNiVERSIlY OP LOUISIANA 



MATCRfTOCHES, LOUISIANA 7 1 497 



I LISA DARDEN 
jews Editor 

A petition against the Univer- 
|ty Bookstore appeared on 
Jorthwestern's campus last week. 

Written and circulated by two 
jorthwestern students, the petition 
pices two complaints: that the book- 
lore buys back textbooks for as little 
5 10 percent of the original purchase 
alue and that a list of books not being 
urchased by the bookstore is not 
iiovided during the buy-back ses- 
ion. 

The students writing and em- 
ulating the petition are Byron McK- 
nney, a junior sociology major from 
flgansport, and Brian Dumell, a jun- 
ur journalism major from Fort 
Vayne, Ind. 

"We've been griping about the 
ookstore every semester," McKin- 
ey said. "Instead of just constantly 
implaining we decided to do sbme- 
ing about it." 

According to Dumell, 150 to 
students had signed the petition 
of Friday. The signatures were ob- 
kined by canvassing the dormitories 
BOSSIER nd standing in front of the bookstore. 

1*61 SS pep* t i t i° n fi rsta PP eare d° ncarn P us 
B— — ^ Jist Wednesday. 

Dated Dec. 16, 1987, the peti- 
lon is addressed to President Robert 
ilost and reads: "We feel that the 
-iii nkQtr>rp J under the management of 
x jVallace Bookstores(sic), has been 

infair to the students in its book re- 
am policy. The bookstore seems to 
lave very little interest in how the 
tudents are treated. Most of the 
looks are very expensive and some 
tudents have received as little as 10 
jercent of their cost upon return. 



Lion 
tase 



Many of the books are only used for a 
short time and the same book you 
paid full amount for only four months 
before now has no value. However 
there is no list of books that will not be 
bought back and students loss (sic) 
valuble (sic) study time waiting in 
lines to find out they cannot sell back 
their books. We realize you are very 
busy, but if you could just look into 
this matter students as a whole would 
benefit. Thank you for your time." 

Durnell and McKinney have 
set a goal of obtaining 1 ,000 signatures 
by the end of this week. If the signa- 
tures are obtained, the authors will 
present the petition to Alost. 

"If we get no response from 
Alost we will turn copies of the peti- 
tion in to the university vice presi- 
dents and area newspapers. If that 
doesn't work we have plans to picket 
the bookstore," McKinney said. 

The authors of the petition are 
upset that some changes promised by 
Wallace's Bookstores, Inc. have not 
been kept. Wallace's took over the 
University Bookstore Aug. 1, 1987, 
after Northwestern placed the store 
on bid during the summer. 

Prior to going out on bid, the 
University Bookstore was a self-gen- 
erated store ran by the university. The 
bookstore is currently a retail outlet 
store. 

The main complaint of the peti- 
tioners is that since Wallace's began 
leasing the store the buy-back value of 
books has dropped considerably and 
many books are not purchased. 
Selling used textbooks back to the 
bookstore has become a tradition for 
many students trying to get cash at the 
end of the semester. 



"We were supposed to get 
more money back for our books when 
Wallace's took over. Out of $320 
worth of books I bought last fall, they 
didn't buy any back," McKinney said. 

"We're just college students. 
It's like stealing from the poor," 
Durnell said of the bookstore's buy- 
back policies. 

An article on Wallace's, which 
appeared in the Sept. 8, 1987, edition 
of the Current Sauce read, "Services 
offered by Wallace's include better 
buying contracts and an expanded 
inventory of more than 3 million used 
books. Wallace's services will allow 
students to see more used books on 
the shelves, a reduction in book prices 
and an increase in sell back prices." 

Another complaint of the peti- 
tioners is that a list of books not being 
bought back by the bookstore is not 
provided. Students must stand in line 
in order to find out whether their 
books are being purchased. 

"I stood in line for four hours 
last fall only to be told 'this book is 
worthless'," McKinney said. "I 
wasted a lot of time." 

Dumell said common reasons 
for books not being purchased by the 
bookstore included books no longer 
being used and that new editions had 
been printed. The bookstore also does 
not buy back paperbacks or work- 
books regardless of their condition, 
Durnell said. 

"Those books are worth some- 
thing to somebody somewhere," 
McKinney said. 

In an interview Friday, the 
petitioners said some action should be 
taken to give the bookstore competi- 
tion. Suggestions such as establishing 



a book exchange program or allowing 
local bookstores to offer university 
textbooks were made. 

However, the petitioners were 
not the first to consider a book ex- 
change program. The Student Gov- 
ernment Association has attempted to 
establish a book exchange program on 
campus. The program has met with 
little success. 

Darlene Rachal, University 
bookstore manager for 16 years, said 
that although the price schedule has 
not been altered since Wallace's took 
over the store, the buy-back policy has 
changed. 

"I no longer keep a book inven- 
tory. Books are ordered only as they 
are needed," Rachal said. "I only buy 
back books I know I need or know will 
be sold." 

Rachal explained that the stu- 
dents are "spoiled" since the store 
used to buy all books back at 50 per- 
cent of the original purchase value. 
The store now follows Wallace's buy- 
back policy and purchases only 
needed books at half the price of 
wholesale costs. 

Of the petition Rachal said, 
"I'm very keen to the students' finan- 
cial problems but they must under- 
stand that this is the law of the land, 
it's economics. They must understand 
that this is a retail outlet like any other 
store." 

Rachal said she is more than 
willing to help any organization es- 
tablish a book exchange program. 
However, she said attempts to estab- 
lish a book exchange program usually 
fail because students want money for 
their books quickly instead of having 
to wait for the next semester to begin. 




Book buyer looks for bargains in bookstore. 



Identity crisis 



)\'ER. R.P 



A 71457 

>: 352-4923 
ir 352-4246 




Students wait in line for ID cards during registration at Northwestern last week. 



Honors day program scheduled 



By M1CHELE BROOMFIELD 
Staff Writer 

Several hundred academically 
gifted and talented high school stu- 
dents have been invited to attend an 
Honors Day program Jan. 30. The 
Louisiana Scholar's College is hosting 
the Honors Day which is a spin-off of 
Senior Day, and the Office of Admis- 
sions and Recruiting is coordinating 
the event. 

According to Gail Jones, coor- 
dinator of the Honors Day program 
and a recruiter/ counselor for the 
Office of Admissions and Recruiting, 
students were chosen to attend the 
program according to their ACT 
scores and recomendations from high 
school counselors. 

The Office of Admissions and 
Recruiting is preparing for 400 high 
school students to attend the Honors 
Day program. Jones said only about 
200 students had responded as of Fri- 
day to the RSVP on the invitation. 

The prospective students of 
the Louisiana Scholars' College will 
participate in interviews, auditions 
and informational sessions during the 



program. Students will tour the cam- 
pus and apply for financial aid and 
admission into the Louisiana Schol- 
ars' College. 

Parents of the students will 
have an opportunity to participate in 
special question and answer sessions 
with Northwestern faculty members. 
Both students and parents will be able 
to ask questions concerning financial 
aid, housing, tuition and fees. 

Students will also participate 
in informal sessions with group pan- 
els. The group panels will be com- 
prised of students on campus and 
representatives from different school 
organizations. Jones said, "We want 
kids to know that it's (the Louisiana 
Scholars' College) not where the 
nerds go." Jones wants prospective 
students to understand the Louisiana 
Scholars' College students can partici- 
pate in on-campus activities with the 
main stream Northwestern students. 

The number of students se- 
lected to attend the Louisiana Schol- 
ars' College is limited to 400. Selec- 
tions are based on about eight differ- 
ent qualifications according to Jones. 



Tnose items taken into consideration 
for admission into the Louisiana 
Scholars' College include interviews, 
auditions, grade point average, and 
ACT scores. 

The Honors Day program will 
begin at 12:30 p.m. with registration in 
the A. A. Fredericks Fine Arts Center. 
The prospective Louisiana Scholars' 
College students will attend tours, 
interviews, auditions and informa- 
tional sessions from 1:30 until 4:30 
p.m. A reception for both parents and 
students will then be held in the Or- 
ville Manchey Art Gallery. 

Northwestern will host the 
prospective students and their par- 
ents at the Southland Conference 
basketball game between Northwest- 
ern and Stephen F. Austin in Prather 
Coliseum. 

For more information on the 
Louisiana Scholars' College Honors 
Day program, contact the Northwest- 
ern Office of Ad missions and Recruit- 
ing at 357^4503 or toll free at 1-800- 
426-3754. 



Scholars' College survives first test semester, ready for second term 



V ©REG KENDRICK 
ditor 

With one semester under its 
P*» the newly established Scholars' 
is 



mainstream. 

"We have a situation where 
many Scholars' College students de- 
cided to choose a major that they 
college is reflecting success even could not complete with our curricu- 
s °ugh 19.5 percent of the starting lum," Chadick said. "We also have 
Ailment has withdrawn from the some students who were unsuccess- 
e 8 e - ful in Scholars' College and were 

Stan Chadick, acting director asked to move over to Northwest- 
tn e Scholars' College, said the pro- ern." 

ra m had a starting enrollment of 134 Chadick explained that some 

j"dents. Of that number,128 com- Scholars' College students desired a 
'eted the semester; however, 20 of specific major not offered in the Schol- 
' ese students decided to move into a ars' College curriculum. 
kj°r offered in the Northwestern "In many instances we could 



oil 



get a student close to the major but not 
quite through the door," Chadick 
said. "The student would have to at- 
tend Northwestern for another 
semester or two after graduating from 
the Scholars' College." 

Chadick said the Scholars' 
College does not have an established 
probation policy. Instead, students 
are evaluated on an individual basis. 
Students who were unsuccesful in 
Scholars' College were asked to leave 
the program. 

"We do not just look at a 
student's GPA," Chadick said . 'There 



are many aspects to observe. We will 
seek the opinion of the student's in- 
structors and evaluate the student's 
class participation, study habits and 
overall behavior. 

"We will then sit the student 
down and explain the situation, and 
asT< he or she to move over to North- 
western. These are hard decisions to 
make, but it is in the interest of the 
student." 

Chadick said he expects little 
change in administrative policy or 
course curriculum for the Scholars' 
College this semester. 



'We have been satisfied with 
the performance of the students this 
year and we are continuing along 
with the program," Chadick said. 

Chadick said there is an em- 
phasis on writing this year, with the 
introduction of a four-hour writing 
intensive course. The class will be 
instructed by various professors spe- 
cializing in different fields within the 
Scholars' College. 

"This course is not necessarily 
within the subject matter of English," 
Chadick said. "It is composition in 
designation but philosophy in con- 



tent. 

Chadick said the Scholars' 
College will also continue with the 
Great Books Seminar studying such 
works as The Inferno, The Canter- 
bury Tales, and Gulliver's Travels . 

Chadick said the remainder of 
the curriculum consists of basic core 
courses expected of any freshman 
student. 

"We created a nice framework 
for the Scholars' College and we hope 
that it will serve for the whole univer- 
sity," Chadick said. 



Exchange student making adjustments to Northwestern ways and weather 



zza 



y Michelle weego 

'OA Writer 

Northwestern State University 
ims to have students hailing from 
J ^, Louisiana to Littleton, Colo- 
' do and all the way to Palmer, 
' as ka. But who can imagine com- 
'■''ing f ort y hours by plane and bus 
^ Nairobi in Kenya, Africa? 

Twenty-five year old Emily 
'* u na can. As a member of ISEP 
1 ter national Student Exchange Pro- 
pyl) she left her husband and two 
. r °ld son at home in order to be 
* *o make the trip to Natchitoches 
begin her graduate studies in 
^ lc - Emily explained how an ISEP 
de n't is able to make such a trip. 



"Students nominated for ISEP 
are given information on the other 
schools associated with the program. 
We had several forms to fill out decid- 
ing school choices. I chose three and 
one was Northwestern." 

"I mainly looked for some- 
thing that catered to my needs. I don't 
really remember the other two choices 
but you could pick anywhere. I could 
have even chosen Ohio." 

"When you choose your col- 
leges, information on you is sent to the 
schools. Then, if one of the schools 
accepts you, the student goes. I guess 
the music department here didn't 
think I was that bad so they agreed to 
have me." 



Emily chose Northwestern for 
several reasons. "I was basically look- 
ing for a place that offers music at the 
graduate level. There is no graduate 
school for music back home. I was told 
that the state universities were very 
good compared to smaller colleges. I 
believe all my choices were state run 
schools." 

"I also liked the fact that North- 
western is located in a small town 
which is something I'm used to. An- 
other deciding factor in choosing NSU 
as one of my options was some infor- 
mation I read about the excellent crea- 
tive arts center." 

In Kenya, Emily worked as a 
graduate assistant at her local school, 



Kenya tta University. "A graduate 
assistant is basically a lecturer. The job 
is for graduate students who haven't 
gotten their first degree yet. When a 
student obtains a degree, he is em- 
ployed at a different level." 

"I plan to get my graduate 
degree and go back to teach. I have the 
option to extend my stay at North- 
western by at least a year." 

"Right now I'm on a study 
leave. If I had to leave here for some 
reason I could go back to my job as an 
assistant. I hope I don't have to do 
that. I want to finish." 

The first and most noticable 
difference Emily saw, or felt, in Amer- 
ica was the cold weather. "In Kenya 



it's almost always hot. Here, it's win- 
ter right now. That's something we 
don't have because we are right on the 
equator. There is a cold and wet sea- 
son around July and August, how- 
ever." 

"When I changed planes in 
New York I got to see snow for the first 
time in my life. It had been scraped off 
the runway, but I still wanted to touch 
it. I heard that snow is fun to play in." 

Emily described the food here 
as "refined." 

"The cakes are so soft. I guess 
it's the white flour. In Kenya our flour 
contains a lot more fiber." 

A staple dish of Kenya is 
"ugali" which is a grain, a bit like rice. 



It is usually eaten with vegatables, 
chicken or beef stew. A vegetarian, 
Emily said she finds the meals here "a 
little better" each time she eats. 

However, she said it does take 
a while to get used to something dif- 
ferent. 

'The dress is something differ- 
ent too. At Kenyatta University, the 
dress is also casual but you rarely see 
women wearing pants. I usually wear 
dresses, skirts or a tunic, which is a 
simple dress. When I came here I had 
to get pants because of the weather. If 
my husband could see me wearing 
these he wouldn't recognize me." 

When asked what she knew 
about Louisiana before she came here, 
Emily replied with a smile, "Jazz!" 



PAGE 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



JANUARY 19, 1987 




Students (left) returning to 
Northwes tern's campus last 
week bring the comforts of 
home to dormitory life in 
Natchitoches Hall. 
Barbara Ferrier fright) 
prepares her class schedule 
for the spring 1988 term at 
Northwestern after sitting 
out of school for 10 years. 
(Photos by TedmSmiih) 




iED 



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need a reason to join 
slana National Guard? 



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highsch 

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i accomp; 
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college or a vocational/technical school, and wou 
like to defray the cost of college by qualifying 
for a GUARANTEED STUDENT LOAN, The Louisiana Army 
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^ maximum of $10/ 000.00, (If you qualify upon enlistment and continue to meet the 
^ requirements). 

1 PART-TIME JOB: In the Louisiana Army National Guard, you'll train one weekend 



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1987 



JANUARY 19, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 3 





[EDITORIAL 



<i R EG KENDRICK 

gditor 



Bookstore policy 
Iced the student 



has always 
masses to 

Crumble under their stacks of texts. In 
l e past the disgruntling was 
■ uen ched by the promise of a %50 
Percent buy-back on a student's 
jLjlcs. But that little bubble has 
iopped now, and the students of this 
Jjjjmpus are finding out just how help- 
less an individual is when they are 
Confronted by a monopoly. 
; That's right, that is the magic 
^ or d here boys and 

i r ls monopoly. And it has been 

happening for some time now; I imag- 
ine since the dawn of Northwestern, 
•fhe only store in town that even 
(irnes close to supplying the needed 
tjxt for a Northwestern class is Pats 
ionomy store, and that is usually a 
fluke. 

Monopolies are not always a 
y^^j^ bad way of catering to a consumer — I 
A. kind of hated to see AT&T split up — 
but when a student observes the buy- 
back policies and cheaper prices their 
friends receive at other universities, 

1+ the grass is suddenly greener on the 
^ other side. 
-JL So what is the solution? You 
i create a petition — that more or less 
^ft reflects the words flung at a 



? J 



sion — and present it to Dr. 

Alost Wrong! Have you ever 

thought about why Northwestern got 
rid of the self-generation policy, and 
allowed a centralized distributor to 
take over the place? It is easy: they 
were loosing money. 

If a bunch of disgruntled stu- 
dents plan to present this petition to 
the Northwestern administration 
don't forget to use biodegradable 
products, it flows much smoother 
through Northwestern's sewer sys- 
tem. 

The students are approaching 
this problem in the wrong way. It is 
not the fault of the Bookstore person- 
nel — hell they are just following or- 
ders — it is not the fault of the NSU 
administration — they just want to 
save money. It is however the fault of 
some corporate mogul named 
Wallace's Bookstores Inc. 

The enemy is invisible and un- 
touchable. So what does the pissed- 
off student do when the book barons 
take full advantage? Find another 
seller. It may be more time consum- 
ing, it may demand a little thought, 
but if the student body unites against 
this consumer rip-off we can defeat it. 

Many College towns have cor- 
ner bookstores spring up over night, 
near the campus, because the demand 



highschool cheerleader bitch ses- for cheaper college text is so great. 



Call up the college stores at other 
universities, make sure they are sup- 
plied by Wallace's competition, and 
make a massive book run. 

Invite the competition into 
Natchitoches. I am sure there are 
companies out there waiting to hear 
about an isolated college community 
that is being screwed over by such a 
monopoly. 

And for God's sake, lets have a 
successful, student operated, book 
buy-back program. Ever wondered 
what happened to the SGA's great 
plans for a book buy-back 
program? never mind, don't an- 
swer that. 

I am partly to blame for this, I 
have failed to mention in the past, that 
classified ads run at S2 a column inch 
in the Current Sauce, but I at least 
expected a few students to catch on. 

It may be obvious to you that I 
am pissed about this situation. I 
bought a brand new book last 
semester that cost well over $30, the 
bookstore was willing to buy it back 
for $6 wholesale; I sold it to my friend 
for S15. This semester certain faculty 
members have told their classes to 
buy their class material at Pat's Econ- 
omy, because the bookstore failed to 
stock enough for the entire class. 

Get the picture? 



Registration woes worse at other NSU 



at 
ch- 
yer 

0a 
Sly 

• in 
o a 
nd 



. By SONYA RIGAUD 
j( Managing Editor 

At exactly 9:05 a.m. on Jan. 5, 
1987 I received a phone call from my 
A sister Cherie asking me if I wanted to 
^ ride with her to Nicholls State Univer- 
•^^sity to pay her fees for the spring 
, semester. (Nicholls is only a half hour 
""jr from my house.) 

I hesitated in answering while 



people here and there that I thought I 
knew way back when. Some of their 
names I remembered, some I did not. 

I also saw an old bovfriend . . . 
wow, that was fun! 



And I met a very nice lady who 
was in back of me in line. She has three 
children and is doing her student 



"Tr thinking of the long lines that often teaching this spring. I learned a lot 



accompany registration here at 



about her, and in turn, she learned a 
lot about me. But ... I wonder what 
her name is. 

One event that really bright- 
ened my day was when Maureen, my 
best friend since second grade, came 
up to me in line and cut in front of 
about 60 or 70 people. She filled me in 



^^Northwestern. As if reading my 
mind, she said that it would not take 
^ very long. Last time she had walked 
.^Lstraight up to the window and paid 
^ the cashier in a total of five minutes. 
-JL I thought to myself, "Well, 
*f maybe this school's got it all together. 
"wMaybe it is simple somewhere, any- on all the scoop I don't hear about up 
■ where but Northwestern. Sure I'll in Natchitoches. We also talked about 
go." school. However, that wasn't as inter- 

t And that's where I made my esting as all the juicy gossip she was 

H mistake. dishing out. 

Cherie picked me up about 
^10:15 a.m. and we arrived in front of 
^Ellei 



We stormed through the front 
.^Ldoors of the building fully expecting a 
™ quick exit . . . but . . . guess what! Yes, 
■«^there were lots and lots of students in 
V line with bill and check in hand. 



^ She replied, "This is only for 
ipre-registered students who still have 
to pay fees. This is not registration, 
'i That's in another building." 

Thank goodness! I would hate 
1 j ^L*to see what registration would be like! 
JUIQ ^ So we hauled ourselves to the 



id 



Oh well, Cherie finally came 
back an hour later and was shocked at 
how little progress I made. I told her to 
get used to it. 

It was now about 12:30 and I 
realized I was going to have to miss 
"Days of Our Lives". Now that was 
going too far! 

Half an hour later we finally 
turned the corner. Yeah! We were 
almost there! Boy, was I glad because 
I was beginning to starve to death by 
then. 

And then I noticed the sudden 
change in my sister's face. So I turned 
only to see a mob of people no longer 
in line fighting their way to the four 



3 

ny 



^^back of the line, which was longer open cashier windows 
'/than any I've ever been in at North- I 



— i any 

■w western. It was 10:55 a.m. and the start 

■ of one horrendous day. 
y( After a 25 minute wait and 
i only moving up about five feet, Ch- 
erie informed me she had an appoint- 
L 1>ent at 1 1 :30 to get her car inspected . 
^ Naturally, I offered to stay in 
,^Hne while she went so that we would 
^ not lose our place. What a stupid ges- 
^Ltare! 

'? While my sister was off play- 
er if >g with her car I discovered quite a 
, bit. I discovered that there were a lot of 



heard one girl scream, "I can't 
breath!" 

Another girl yelled, "That's the 
purpose!" 

Everyone seemed to think that 
was hilarious. Isn't it amazing how 
some people can retain their sense of 
humor under extreme conditions? 

I, however, saw no humor in 
that remark because pretty soon I 
would become one of those pushing 
and shoving students. 

So . . ., we inched up a little 
closer and did indeed become part of 



that mob that terrified my sister so 
much. 

It was really getting to me by 
then. I had an elbow in my left side 
and Maureen was whining about 
missing "Santa Barbara" to my right. 
Some disgusting guy was breathing 
hot air down my neck and in front of 

me there were so many people that it 
reminded me of the Christmas Festi- 
val. 

But where was my sister? 
Somehow we got separated and she 
was about four people behind me. I 
thought to myself, "Now, wait a min- 
ute. I don't have to pay anything and 
I'm ahead of her. This is ridiculous!" 

At about 2:45, after an hour of 
hardly breathing and hardly budging, 
my friend came up with a brilliant 
idea. She offered to stay in line and 
pay Cherie's fees for her. Cherie, who 
was supposed to be back to work by 
noon, handed over her check and bill 
with total trust and willingness. And 
so my treacherous experience for the 
day was over. 

Bless you, Maureen! 

I guess the point I'm really 
trying to relate to you is that even 
though you think it's a pain to register 
and pay fees at Northwestern, it's not 
as bad as some schools. 

Those of you who did not pre- 
register may have had to wait in a long 
line to get through registration, but 
believe me, that line was nothing 
compared to the line I stood in on Jan. 
5. Take my advice, next time pre-reg- 
ister and all you will have to do is pay 
fees. (Hopefully, I will do as I'm tell- 
ing you to, because I was one of you 
waiting in that line on the fourth 
floor.) 

Going on to fee payment, I 
prayed that it would not take as long 
as my experience I have related to 
you. 

Walking out of the building, 
completely finished, I realized that it 
had only taken me an hour to pay my 
fees where it took my sister about four 
hours. What a considerable differ- 
ence! 

Thanks, Mrs. Tabor! 



back \o scnoo\ . . • • 




f „VLL ADMIT IT3 A FORM OF \ 
CHARiTy, ^OSH ...... BUT i'D HARDLS* 

CALL iT SOCiALi SM I J 




WRITE A LETTER 
TO THE EDITOR 



Writer wants fair book policy 



Dear Editor, 

Asa student at Northwestern, I 
feel that I should receive the best serv- 
ice possible for my money. This 
means that the university should offer 
a fair service, and I will pay a fair 
price. This idea has not been realized, 
however, at the University Bookstore. 

I pay enough just to take 
classes here, is it too much to ask that 
I pay reasonable prices for my books? 
Not only are original prices outra- 
geous, but the sell-back price is ridicu- 
lous. I bought over $200 worth of 
books and when I went to sell them 
back they told me a majority of them 
were worthless. Why wasn't I in- 
formed of this worthlessness before I 
got at the end of that mile-long line, or 
better yet, when I went to buy the 
books in the first place? I understand 
that capitalism and making a profit 
are the foundation of the American 



Dream, but this is insane. I am in- 
sulted by the absolute greed shown by 
the University Bookstore. 

But I am not alone in my out- 
rage. A majority of the other students 
with whom I have discussed this are 
equally upset about the worsening 
situation with which the bookstore 
has presented us. As a result, a peti- 
tion against the bookstore is currently 
being circulated around campus. It 
will be presented to several higher- 
ups such as the president of the uni- 
versity and we will get our point 
across. Hopefully, some changes for 
the better will be brought about at the 
bookstore. We are not asking that they 
give the books away to us and give a 
500 percent return on them at the end 
of the semester; all we want is fairness. 

Sincerely, 
Buddy McKinney 



^"CURRENT QUOTES 



i< 



What is your New Year's Resolution? 





S^ndy Aff eltranger 
( 2 * Education 
f Ti °ga 

' "My resolutions were to stay 
f ° ut °f trouble and drink less." 



John Frost 
4-4, Advertising/Design 
DeRidder 

"My resolutions are to com- 
plete the classes I start and hopefully 
graduate in the fall." 



Nan Goss 

4-1, Broadcasting 

Many 

"My New Year's resolutions 
are not to fight with Todd, to match 
my clothes and fix my hair everyday. " 



Kristine Kennedy 

2-2, Business Education 

Natchitoches 

"Two of my New Year's reso- 
lutions are to study harder and to get 
in shape." 



Jay Roy Mount 

4-1, Physical Education 

Sicily Island 

"My resolutions are to set pri- 
orities straight, be a better person and 
to get in excellent physical shape." 



CURRENT SAUCE 



GREG KENDRICK 

Editor 



SONYA RtGAUD 

Managing Editor 



USA DARDEN 

News Editor 



STAFF WRITERS 

Michele Broomfieid 
Teresa Lee 
Dan Mediin 
Christi Rhymes 
Michelle Weego 



ALLEN EVANS 

Advertising Manager 



EDD LEE 

Circulation/Distribution 



MICHELLE WEEGO 

Cartoonist 



WILLIAM FRANCO 
TEDRIS SMITH 

Photographers 

TOM WHITEHEAD 

Adviser 



The Current Sauce Is 
published weekty during the f aS 
and spring semesters by fhe stu- 
dents of Northwestern State Uni- 
versity of Louisiana. If is not asso- 
ciafed with any of fhe 
University's departments and is 
financed Independently. 

The Cuftent Sauce is 
based in the Office of Student 
Publications located in Kyser 
Has. The office of fhe edftorfctf 
staff is 225H. telephone (318) 
357-5456. The adviser's off<ce is 
103 Kyser Hot. tefephone 357* 
5213. 

The maiiing address for 
the Current Sauce is P.O. Box 
5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 
7)497. 

Ail correspondence, in- 
ciudtng tetters to fhe editor is 
welcome. Materia) subrrutted 
for consideration must be 
mailed to above address or 
brought to the office. 

The deadline for att ad- 
vertising and copy is Friday by 3 
p.m. inclusion of any and all 
materia) ts left to fhe discretion of 
the editor. 

letters to the editor 
should be typed (doubie- 
spoced) signed, and should in- 
clude a telephone number 
where the writer can be 
reached. No anonymous fetters 
will be print ea. 

Cutrent sauce subscrip- 
tion rates are S ) 1 per academic 
yecr (27 issues) or $6 per 
semester (!4 issues). The paper ts 
entered as second-class maS at 
Natchitoches. LA. The USPS 
number is 140-660 



PAGE 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



JANUARY 19, 1987 



NEWS 




Past activities director 
joins Westminster staff 



Cultural act happy here 

o 



Camille Hawthorne, who has 
been on the administration of North- 
western between 1976 and 1987, has 
been appointed assistant dean of stu- 
dent affairs at Westminster College 
effective Jan. 4. 

She will be on the staff of Dr. 
Robert Thomas, Jr., vice president for 
student affairs, and be responsible for 
orientation, student activities and 
program publication of the handbook 
and calendar, advising, and other 
duties as assigned. 

During Hawthorne's tenure at 
Northwestern she has had a variety of 
responsibilities in student affairs, in- 
cluding a five-year term as director of 
student activities and organizations. 
She also has held the positions of as- 
sistant dean of students/student ac- 
tivities and assistant to the student life 
director. 

She earned both her bachelor 
of science degree and business man- 



agement degree in student personnel 
services at Northwestern. In addition, 
she has taken efforts toward complet- 
ing the doctorate of philosophy in 
higher education at the University of 
Mississippi. 

She is a member of the Ameri- 
can Association for Counseling and 
Development, American College Per- 
sonnel Association, National Associa- 
tion for Campus Activities, Associa- 
tion of College Unions-International, 
and several state professional groups. 
She has been coordinator of the Lou- 
isiana Blood Center and finance coor- 
dinator of the Natchitoches-North- 
western Folk Festival. 

Hawthorne has received sev- 
eral awards for outstanding service in 
the student personnel profession and 
the mayor's Greek service award. She 
also was elected to Outstanding 
Young Women of America. 



By GREG KENDRICK 
Editor 

Keeping the culture alive'.'.a 
family act. 

Monty and Marsha Brown 
have been working at North western's 
Louisiana Folklife Center since the fall 
semester. Monty has the position-of 
folk music coordinator and Marsha ft 
a marketing specialist. But when their 
are away from the desk they ire 
known as the duet "Cahoots" tha't 
ramrod numerous local music everftJ. 

Monty said he is pleased witf 
his position at Northwestern, calling 
Natchitoches a cultural melting pSl 
for Louisiana folk music. 
"Northwestern is a good, culturally 
centralized location that is rich-ih 
heritage," Monty said. "You get ti 
meeting of various cultures here." 

Monty coordinates programs 
for such events as the Natchitoches 
Folk Festival, which occurs in July, 
and the Folklife Conference, which 
will occur this March. He is also the 
producer, writer and narrator of the 
program "Louisiana Folk Music," 
which is presented Saturday evening's 
on KDAQ-FM, 88.9 mHz, after the 

UK ti 



program "A Prarie Home Compan- 
ion." 

The Browns have recently 
grabbed a piece of the limelight by 
writing and recording the tune 
"Would You Fly?" which serves as the 
opener for the broad way production 
of Robert Harling's "Steel Magno- 
lias." 

Although the Browns said they 
are content with their work environ- 
ment at Northwestern and what the 
community has to offer them, they 
both agree that the attitude of the col- 
lege student has changed. 

The Louisiana Folklife center 
attempted to sponsor a series of 
lunchtime programs that wouid en- 
able Northwestern students and fac- 
ulty, who had musical abilities, to 
display their talent in a casual atmos- 
phere. The attempt failed because of 
little student interest or participation. 

"When I went to college 20 
years ago, 1 recall lunchtime activities 
such as musical events being well at- 
tended," Monty said. "It appears that 
today's college student is no longer 
interested in this." 



N 

-■end J ohl 
^rilli ant 
.pamed « 
Most Va 




Monty and Marsha Brown 



Northwestern department receives research grant to develop program 



By SONYA RIGAUD 
Managing Editor 

The Sabine River Authority of 
Louisiana has awarded a $208,000 
grant to the Department of Biology 
and Microbiology at Northwestern to 
develop research and service pro- 
grams in aquaculture. 

According to Dr. Tom Bums, 
professor of biology and chairman of 
the Northwestern Department of Bi- 
ology and Microbiology, the purpose 
of the three year project is to develop 
aquaculture programs to serve a six 
parish region which includes water 
supplied by the Sabine River Author- 
ity of Louisiana. 

Burns said aquaculture is the 
farming of aquatic species such as 
crayfish, catfish and freshwater 
shrimp. 

DeSoto, Sabine, Vernon, Beau- 
regard, Calcasieu and Cameron are 
the parishes included in the service 



area of the grant. 

'This project has a tremendous 
amount of potential because it is an 
area that is big business in this state," 
Bums said. 

According to Burns, the state's 
abundance of crayfish proves the 
importance of aquaculture. 

Burns said, "We (Louisiana) 
supply almost all the crayfish in this 
country and right now that is a $71 
million-a-year business." 

Burns said Northwestern's 
president, Dr. Robert Alost, was in- 
strumental in the initiation of the 
aquaculture project. He said the grant 
to develop research and service pro- 
gram in aquaculture was obtained 
with the assistance of H.M. "Mutt" 
Fowler, executive director of the 
Sabine River Authority of Louisiana. 

Alost and, Burns recently ac- 
cepted documents outlining approval 
of the grant from Fowler, along with 



L.B. Skinner and Robert Gentry' of 
Many. Skinner and Gentry are mem- 
bers of the Sabine River Authority 
Board of Commissioners, with Skin- 
ner being chairman of the board. 

Fowler said, 'The Sabine River 
Authority is eager to work with 
Northwestern on this project, which 
we feel that the potential for 
enormous economic impact on this 
region of the state in the years ahead," 

Burns said Northwestern will 
soon begin a nationwide search for an 
aquaculturalist who will direct the 
program, which is scheduled to begin 
in July of 1988. 

An aquaculturalist is a person 
who has experience in both vertebrate 
and invertebrate warmwater aquac- 
ulture, research experience and publi- 
cations in an area of expertise. 

The aquaculturalist will have 
the responsibility of initiating a pro- 
gram which would be unique to 



northern Louisiana. Burns said no 
other university in this area has devel- 
oped such a program. 

"Inaugurating this program 
has tremendous economic and re- 
search potential for our region and the 
state of Louisiana," Burns said. 

"In the United States, the 
aquatic industry in the southeast pro- 
duces 65 percent of all aquatic com- 
modities with a total pond value of 
$225 million. According to the 1987 
study by the Louisiana Cooperative 
Extension Service, Louisiana leads the 
nation in the area of commercial aq- 
uaculture." 

Burns added that research 
monies are available to develop the 
basic technology necessary for the 
advancement of aquaculture. 

Burns said Northwestern's 
role in developing an aquaculture 
program initially would involve the 
implementation of an overall basic 



research program in selected areas of 
aquaculture. 

The aquaculturalist is ex- 
pected to receive recommendations 
from an outside support organization 
comprised of area farmers and busi- 
nesses involved in aquaculture. 

The aquaculturalist is also re- 
sponsible for establishing short and 
long-term goals of the aquaculture 
program and will receive support 
from the faculty and facilities offered 
by the Department of Biology and 
Microbiology at Northwestern. 

"The faculty background and 
research experiences blend into an 
aquatic research-oriented program," 
said Burns. 

"We have faculty who have 
done work on stress physiology of 
fish, identification and life history of 
fish species, aquatic plant control, and 
use of aquatic plants for bank stabili- 
zation." 



Nl 

>lishmer 
>niors d 
Jbr the 1! 
Susociati 
Soth rum 
Jiefensiv< 
piamed fi 
Fc 

third stra 
first tearr 
a first in 
man, Ste 
LSWA F: 

Bums added, "One of our f a ? taking h 
ulty members was a pioneer in th T«-. 
study of brown shrimp parasites art JLA I 
has worked extensively with par: 
sites of fish. In addition, facul?^ 
members have been involved withth 
study of freshwater clams 



Raff Writ 
At 



tion a: 
Q 

iureactiv 



Coca-Cola party to benefit Special Olympics planned 



By DAN MEDLIN 
Staff Writer 

"Club Coca-Cola"™-is coming" 
to town and you will want to be there. 
The date is set for 7 p.m. Feb. 2 in 
Prather Coliseum and best of all, 
admission is free. 

The event is described as a touring 
dance club extravaganza. What that 
means is that today's favorite music 
videos will be shown on a 300-square- 
foot screen, accompanied by special 
effects and hosted by Max Headroom. 
Refreshments will, of course, be pro- 
vided by Coca-Cola. 

"Club Coca-Cola,"™ sponsored 



by Coca-Cola USA, will benefit Spe- 
cial Olympics. The Special Olympics 
program contributes to the physical, 
social and psychological develop- 
ment of people with mental retarda- 
tion. Special Olympics provides 
year-round sports-training and ath- 
letic competition in a variety of Olym- 
pic-type sports. In addition to benefits 
to Special Olympics, receipts from the 
sale of concessions will benefit the 
Northwestern Student Activities 
Board. 

The "Club Coca-Cola"™ tour, 
launched in early October of 1987, is 
the country's largest touring dance 



club. Coca-Cola USA officials esti- 
mated that more than 125,000 stu- 
dents at 100 campuses along the At- 
lantic Coast and the Midwest — plus 
military personnel, their families and 
friends at selected U.S. bases — will 
have packed the Club before the end 
of 1987. 

v , ■tOl'! 

"Club Coca-Cola"™ features a 
wide selection of music videos as 
performed by today's hottest artists, 
music legends, and rising rock 
groups, including the Police, Genesis, 
Run DMC, Whitney Houston, Bon 
Jovi, U2, Aretha Franklin, The Cult, 



Amazulu, Duran Duran, Billy Idol, 
and The Art of Noise. 

First-edition "Club Coca- 
Cola"™ T-shirts will be sold at the 
coliseum. Guests taking a break from 
the dance floor activity can watch ei- 
ther of two 19-inch television moni- 
tors positioned near the "Club Coca- 
Cola"™ refreshment center. 

"Club Coca-Cola"™ should be 
one of the most exciting events to 
happen at Northwestern this 
semester. Make plans to attend — 7 
p.m. Feb. 2, Prather Coliseum... be 
there, catch the wave. 



Student Activities Board announces schedule 



By CHRISTI RHYMES 
Staff Writer 

The Student Activities Board 
(SAB) has planned a number of excit- 
ing events to entertain Northwestern 
students during the up and coming 
spring semester. 

The first event of the semester is 
scheduled for Feb. 2. The Wild, Wild 
Video Party is being sponsored by 
Coca Cola. In addition to a wide vari- 
ety of video music hosted by Max 
Headroom, the party will also include 
dancing and refreshments. Admis- 
sion to the party will be free with a 
Northwestern I.D. Admission with- 
out an I.D. will be $1 per person. 

Student buys 
surprise package 

By LISA DARDEN 
News Editor 

Senior Tony Mault got less 
than he bargained for when he went to 
buy his books last week. 

Picking up a new astronomy 
book for his physics 1 120 class, Mault, 
an aviation science major from 
Portsmouth, Va., had quite a surprise 
when he got back to his room. 

Unwrapping the cellophane 
from around his brand new book, 
Mault was surprised to find that por- 
tions of the first two chapters of his 
book were highlighted in a bright 
yellow. 

Paying $45.65 for a used book 
was not Mault's idea of economizing 
so he returned the book to the book- 
store. 

'They were as surprised as me 
to see the highlighting," Mault said. 

After determining that the new 
book was "not so new", the bookstore 
offered Mault a brand new astronomy 
book. 

"They were real cooperative 
and took the book back," he said. 



According to Rachel Heider, 
public relations agent for the SAB, the 
party will benefit Special Olympics 
and the SAB. Heider said T-shirts and 
cokes will be available at the video 
party. 

For students who enjoy com- 
edy, this is the semester for them. SAB 
has booked several comedians who 
will be appearing at Northwestern 
this semester. The list of comedians 
includes Dave Rudolf, a well-known 
comedian who has appeared at 
Northwestern before. 

SAB has also scheduled several 
events and activities to correspond 
with Black History Month. A major 



attraction during Black History 
Month will be Harvey Griffith. Grif- 
fith is a renowned harpist. 

SAB's annual and much looked 
forward to "Spring Fling" has been 
planned for the week of March 21-24. 
Spring Fling, which is sched uled right 
before spring break, promises to be 
lots of fun for everyone. Spring Fling 
is a week-long schedule of events 
including such activities as movies, 
parties, comedians and a blow out 
party the last nieht of thp wool. 

According to Heider, the stu- 
dent association fee, which is paid 
during registration, allocates a por- 
tion of the money to the SAB in order 



to provide many types of entertain- 
ment for the students. 

The student association fee also 
allows students access to the North- 
western Recreation Complex, which 
includes a golf course, tennis courts 
and an Olympic-size swimming pool. 



Students wishing to get in- 
volved with SAB in planning activi- 
ties for Northwestern are encouar- 
aged to join the Student Activities 
Board. For additional information on 
upcoming events or to get involved, 
go by room 214 in the Student Union 
or call 357-6511. 



The department's microbic "' S ', a 
ogy section has the capability aif"' ^ 
expertise to identify and culture bat . 
terial species that would be harmful 
aquatic organisms, Bums said. 

"Our graduate program i 
biology and microbiology is consir ' . 
ered one of the strongest in the sta [f Cr ^ l ^^ 1 
and offers a tremendous potential ft ent g 
an aquaculture research program^^ ^ 
Burns said. . ' 

For further information on ^^^ r& ^ \ 
aquaculture program, call 357-5323^^ ^ 
write Burns, Chairman, Departmei ,. 
of Biology and Microbiology, Norti^^ w 
western State University, Natchilt 
ches, LA 71497. 

B< 

BC 

basketbal 
this sprin 
profitabU 
Th 

away," v* 
maining : 
beginninj 
time enrc 
toches cai 
£50 each ; 
the stude 



ATTENTION BSN 
CLASS OF 1988. 

The Air Force has a special pro- 
gram for 1988 BSNs. If selected, 
you can enter active duty soon 
- after graduation— without waiting 
for the results of your State Boards. 
To qualify, you must have an 
overall "B" average. After commis- 
sioning, you'll attend a five-month 
internship at a major Air Force 
medical facility. It's an excellent 
way to prepare for the wide range 
of experiences you'll have serving 
your country as an Air Force nurse 
officer. For more information, call 

SSgt Gagliardi 
817-244-4580 Collect 
1 -800-423-USAF Toll Free 



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> 1987 



JANUARY 19, 1987 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 5 




Kulakowski named Southland Conference MVP defensive player 




NEWS BUREAU— Defensive 
■ n( l John Kulakowski capped off a 
brilliant season and career by being 
^ aine d the Southland Conference's 
^lost Valuable defensive player, it 

aS announced over the weekend. 

Kulakowski was the only 
m on named to the SLC's first team, 
ough rive other Demon players 
erited second team honors. On of- 
se, tailback John Stephens, flanker 
yd Turner and center Jeff Steers 
re recognized while linebacker 
reddie Wallace and cornerback 
ndy Hilliard were sited on the de- 



fensive side of the ball. 

Demon head coach Sam Good- 
win said, "Nobody was more deserv- 
ing of the recognition than TCool'. He 
played hurt, he played hard and he 
was a leader in every sense of the 
word, both on and off the field. If you 
cut that guy open he'd bleed purple — 
there's a player who's all Demon. His 
stats were outstanding, but he also 
contributed in other areas that don't 
show up on a stat sheet." 

Kulakowshi, who earned his 
fourth letter this year — his fourth as a 
starter — set what is believed to be a 
school record with 15 quarterback 



sacks. His 96 tackles ranked third on 
the team and first among all defensive 
linemen and he also had nine tackles 
that went for losses along with a pair 
of fumble recoveries, a pass break-up 
and a tackle that caused a fumble. He 
was a second team all-Gulf conference 
selection last year. 

Stephens, who set a new career 
rushing record this year despite see- 
ing action in just parts of seven full 
games, ran for 646 yards and a team- 
high six touchdowns. The 6-2, 215 
pounder ended his career with 3,057 
yards on 653 carries (another school 
standard) with 19 rushing touch- 



downs. He also managed 58 recep- 
tions for an additional 716 yards and 
four scores. 

Turner emerged as NSU's class 
receiver, pulling in 25 receptions for 
522 yards (a 20.8 average) and three 
touchdowns. Named to the second 
team despite missing two games with 
a pulled left hamstring, the 6-1 junior 
will return next year to keep the 
Demon receiving game in continuing 
good hands. 

Steers, a starter since the tail 
end of his freshman year, also returns 
next year after his best blocking per- 



formance yet in 1987. He anchored a 
young offensive line that promises to 
be an even more improved unit in 
1988. 

Wallace led all Northwestern 
State tacklers from start to finish, 
ending up the 1987 campaign with 117 
stops (71 solo, 46 assists), including 
two for losses and one sack of an en- 
emy quarterback. The leader of a de- 
fense that wound up second in the 
Southland in total defense, Wallace 
also returns for his senior season in 
1988. 

Joining him will be sophomore 



Randy Hilliard, who led all defensive 
players for the second straight year in 
pass break-ups with 10. He added two 
pass interceptions and 33 tackles (19 
solo, 14 assists). 

Goodwin, whose fifth NSU 
club wound up 6-5 after capturing its 
last three games, was optimistic about 
his team's 1988 chances. "These four 
guys who'll be back with us next year 
getting recognized will really help us 
out next year and give their team- 
mates something to shoot for when 
we begin preparing for the 1988 sea- 
son," Goodwin said. 



\Demon seniors selected by Sportswriters to team 



ram 



NEWS BUREAU— The accom- 
ilishments of two Northwestern State 
niors didn't go unnoticed by voters 
for the 1987 Louisiana Sportswriters 
L sso ciation (LSWA) football team as 
toth running back John Stephens and 
L ere nsive end John Kulakowski were 
'named first team members. 

For Stephens, it marked the 
third straight year he has garnered 
first team status, a feat which may be 
a fj r st in LSWA history. As a fresh- 
man, Stephens was named as the 
LSWA Freshman of the year before 
staking his claim to first team honors 



Intramural building gets maintenance care over holidays 



ed, "One of our fa| 
as a pioneer in q 
hrimp parasites ai< 
lively with pa. ERESA lee 
1 addmor, facu^ affWrlfer 

*n involved with* As most Northwestern sta- 
ler clams. facu] ^ gtaff and 
trtment s m.crob.c^y^ their christmas break/ many 



in 1985, 1986 and this year. 

Stephens wrapped up his ca- 
reer as the all-time leading rusher in 
NSU history after surpassing the late 
Joe Delaney on his last carry as a 
Demon. The Springhill native ended 
his career with 3,057 yards on 653 
carries (another school mark). He 
rushed for 19 touchdowns and 
reached the endzone another four 
times via the pass reception. 

Kulakowski put the finishing 
touches on an outstanding season in 
which he was named as the Southland 
Conference's defensive player of the 



year. A second team All-LSWA selec- 
tion last year, NSU's all-time sack 
leader, tallied 96 tackles